Casa Rosa (2017) by Mezzo Atelier located in Ponta Delgada, Portugal | The Hardt

 

Casa Rosa (2017) by Mezzo Atelier located in Ponta Delgada, Portugal. In the Atlantic island of São Miguel, in the Azores, an old stable of the early twentieth century was converted into two residences where history and contemporaneity coexist in balance. The main objective of the project was to maintain the character, the lines and the rural atmosphere of the construction, at the same time that it adapts the structure annexed to a completely new typology and to the contemporary regulations. New openings were carefully torn into the colored facades as well as the stone wall, and a new volume was added to the main building, allowing a smaller second residence to appear integrated into the whole.

 

 


 

The larger residence develops on two levels: the ground floor opens onto the surrounding outdoor spaces and reaches different heights creating a semi-level pavement where a social space gives access to the suites and private service area. The upper deck contains the social spaces and was designed as a free plan so that it can be availed from the roof structure and in its total height. From the ocher kitchen, there is an access to a terrace situated on top of the smaller residence on the ground floor. New elements, such as the exterior stairs that connect the outdoor terrace or the use of bleached wood in the interiors, are re-interpretations of the Azorean vernacular architecture, which was important to signify the project. The aged tones of pink and ocher are the main identity of the area where the edification is seated. The ocher was traditionally used to frame windows and doors and in this residence was used in the interior tables of the dormitories and the kitchen, adding a new type of relation between interior and exterior views.

 


 

Tailor-made interiors and furniture have been carefully designed to create a neutral and peaceful atmosphere, allowing garden views to be prominent in the interior spaces. The local wood (Japanese cedar) was used extensively for construction and furniture and old beams of pine and acacia wood, also found on the site, were converted into custom-made tables.

 

 

© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG

 

 


 

 

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