Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson

Asher 10:14 pm 10:14 pm

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson, situated in Tokyo, Japan | The Hardt

 

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson, situated in Tokyo, Japan. This design for a compact site in a suburb of Tokyo, the office’s first realized the domestic project in Japan, takes the form of a rectangular box containing living quarters, a room dedicated to the rituals of the traditional tea ceremony and a double-height courtyard open to the sky. The concrete envelope is tinted to reflect the internal division between floors and animated by openings. These apertures frame a series of meticulously edited vistas out of the building that become part of the landscape of the interior. The exaggerated length of the wall leading to the entrance brings quiet theatre to the experience of arrival. Project Team Shingo Ozawa

 

Photography Hisao Suzuki

Aberto Studio (2012) by AR Arquitetos

Aberto Studio (2012) by AR Arquitetos

Asher 1:35 pm 1:37 pm

Situated in Sao Paulo, Brasil, Aberto Studio (2012) by AR Arquitetos | The Hardt

 

Situated in Sao Paulo, Brasil, Aberto Studio (2012) by AR Arquitetos. This is what an optimal environment for creative expression looks like (to me) The project proposes an exercise in the indoor-outdoor relationship and its materialization, the idea of limit (mass/opacity) and continuity (openness/transparency). A semi-public square proposed in front of the site invades the studio as a street that unfolds between dense rectangular prisms (“buildings”), opening into an “interior courtyard” a space to paint.

These “buildings”, 3 volumes in concrete, house the functional program of the studio (office, library, preparation room, services, storage, and a mezzanine). When they leave the program, its dense and blind walls externally delimit the “street” and “square”, setting a kind of covered shed where the artist paints. While the opaque faces delimit functions and use, its open and transparent faces open onto internal courtyards and gardens, dissolving the boundaries between interior and exterior, between building and site.

 

 

Benches and continuous countertops cross borders, stating that continuity. The volume of the building, extrapolating the boundary of the roof, also contributes to dissolve the border. The line of the wall, on the other hand, limits part of this retreat, establishing a solid boundary between the square (public void) and the courtyard (private void).

© Maíra Acayaba

Fan Zeng Art Gallery (2014) by Original Design Studio

Fan Zeng Art Gallery (2014) by Original Design Studio

Asher 3:24 pm 3:24 pm

Fan Zeng Art Gallery (2014) by Original Design Studio located in Nantong, Jiangsu, China | The Hardt

 

Fan Zeng Art Gallery (2014) by Original Design Studio located in Nantong, Jiangsu, China. The Fan Zeng Art Gallery is built for the exhibition, communication, research and collection of calligraphy, paintings and poetry, created by the teacher Fan Zeng and Family in the city of Nantong. The concept of the Fan Zeng Art Gallery started from the “patio”, an element of the traditional space. In order to create an atmosphere of “modern creations under the old rules”, the designers separate the playground from the physical circumstance and then combine the behavior of visiting together with that of thinking. Photos by © Yao li-Su Shengliang.

 


 

The “relationship patios” are a theme of the art gallery. It is reflected for the first time in the presentation of three different patios: “patio de bien” on the ground floor, “patio de agua” and “patio de piedra” going from north to south and “fenced patio” on the third floor. With these ratios, a three-dimensional frame of patios is established, where these courtyards play an important role. At first, the idea of “three-dimensional patio” aims to reduce the volume of the building. Therefore, a large and integral volume is transferred in three smaller volumes. Thus, the scale of the courtyards focuses on the scale of the human body, and then it can be more sensible and understandable. Designers move away from the grid system and make partial relationships a new beginning. The three apparently unrelated courtyards are assembled for their own reasons, and unexpectedly become dynamic spaces with diverse connections to each other.

 

 


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The “viewing patio” is another topic. The partial relationships are juxtaposed so that they can be presented in sequence, and therefore make it possible for people to visit and visualize. In the fragment of the scenes, relationships emerge one after the other. Although they are juxtaposed, there is still contact between them. They connect with each other in our mind, so that the whole can be visualized. The art gallery advocates the “diffuse border” in order to break the usual separation in the exhibition by a dispersed display mode. This helps to build a miraculous space with several possible paths. His narrative mode is never formed by the central exhibition, but is led by the route and experience. Change the original concept of obstruction and communication in an interesting way, It brings smoothly and smoothly an exploratory way for visitors, but it still refuses to be boring or shallow. This is the beauty of the so-called Eastern tortuosity.

 


 

“Patios of artistic conception” stand out, too. The Fan Zeng Art Gallery realizes the conception of “less is more”, the detailed control of existence, and the vision of abundance within a soft appearance. Instead of a strong general framework that carries the whole story with a clear norm, it produces a relatively flexible and spontaneous partial relationship of the three different courtyards. The theme of the “evolutionary relationship” means that the evolution of the relationship itself plays a more important role than the evolution of each unit. Thus, the design reconstructs the relationship of three patios, but it does not make any great change in either. Three courtyards in a simple prototype that are not far from the traditional way, but in reality, they express an extraordinary possibility of communication and intermediation among themselves. Today, we usually call the modern spirit under a traditional cover, the so-called modernity and tradition not only depend on formality but also require a thinking spirit.

 


 

The Fan Zeng Art Gallery is an ethereal camera that lets water and ink mix, making it possible to make light of the strong. It represents an attitude that pays tribute to the Chinese brush painting of having the universe within an inch, realizing all the complexity in each simple part, and showing the full charm with a pure spirit.

 

 

© Yao li-Su Shengliang

 


 

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MAAVC by Camilo Rebelo + Tiago Pimente

MAAVC by Camilo Rebelo + Tiago Pimente

Asher 9:56 pm 9:56 pm

Situated in Vila Nova de Foz Côa, Portugal, MAAVC by Camilo Rebelo + Tiago Pimente | The Hardt

 

Situated in Vila Nova de Foz Côa, Portugal, MAAVC by Camilo Rebelo + Tiago Pimentel.  To build the Museum of Art and Archaeology of the Côa Valley we connected different parameters: topography, accessibilities, and program. The fusion of these aspects was highly important for the concept definition – to conceive a museum as an installation on the landscape. The topography was crucial in our decisions since we had to deal with an enormous difference between the museum entrance and the interior of the building. The arrival is made at the top of this topography and that was one of the reasons to create a platform, a terrace, a belvedere – the stage scenario is the huge and impressive landscape with mountains and valleys.

 

 


 

The arrival, a contemplation moment and a parking space as well – as at the same time the museum entrance. The body strategy, in relation to topography, is natural; this means that the platform assumes the same level of the street that ends on the building while the terrain goes down along the side walls showing, in the front elevation, the total height of the volume. On the higher level of the terrain, the monolithic triangular form is a direct result of the valley’s confluences. This triangular body happens in the middle line of the two valleys, facing them (Vale de José Esteves and Vale do Forno) – the third side faces the crossing of Douro and Côa rivers. Its materiality evokes the local stone yards and reflects two different natures: the concrete’s matter and the local stone’s texture and color. For the building expression, we decided to use concrete made with shale pigment (local stone) – the concrete’s texture was made with several molds that were extracted directly from the existing rocks.

 


 

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Outdistance by Derek Swalwell

Outdistance by Derek Swalwell

Asher 7:04 pm 7:07 pm

Outdistance, the first solo show by my friend and prominent architecture photographer, Derek Swalwell. Shot entirely in Italy | The Hardt

 

Outdistance, the first solo show by my friend and prominent architecture photographer, Derek Swalwell. Shot entirely in Italy, Swalwell takes an intimate look at the works of famed architects Carlo Scarpa, Aldo Rossi and Carlo Aymonino to uncover a new narrative around these historically significant locations.

Through his curious lens and precise composition, Outdistance pays an extraordinary tribute to these design greats, focusing in on the details whilst capturing the magnetic dance between architecture and light.

Derek’s work has featured in a magnitude of design and architecture books and magazines across the world, including Architectural Digest (USA), Architectural Digest (MEX), Vogue Living, Architectural Review, Architecture Australia, Elle Decor to name a few.

 

 


 

Architecture has always been a fascination for me, and I think one of the contributing factors was my time traveling and seeing architectural innovation from across the world. I became interested in how the light worked through buildings. The way that the design of a building contributes to it’s changing throughout the day upon their trajectory of the sun.” 

– Derek Swalwell

 

 

Learn more about Derek Swalwell and his latest work here

 


 

 

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Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor

Asher 3:42 pm 3:50 pm

 

 

 

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor located in Chur, Switzerland | The Hardt

 

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor located in Chur, Switzerland. Peter Zumthor is a Swiss architect I put right up there with Tadao Ando as my all time favorite. Mr. Zumthor is responsible for designing a piece of architecture so stunning, it made me rethink the entire concept of what a building actually is, from a very rudimentary basis. The building is the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria by Peter Zumthor. I’ll do a post here and a full post on the site this week. But I digress, one of the first big projects for the 2009 Pritzker Prize-winning architect Peter Zumthor was this protective pavilion built to cover the remains of two Roman buildings. Built in 1985-86 and located in the capital of the Swiss canton of Graubünden.       

 

 


 

Chur is no less than the oldest town in Switzerland: the first settlements found at the site date to 3.500BC. In 15BC the Roman Empire conquered the village and designated Chur (Curia Raetorum) to be the capital of their new funded Roman province of Curia – hence the name Chur.  In those days the location at the right shore of the Rhine River was a strategic crossroad where several of the major Alpine transit routes came together before continuing down river. The Romans inhabited the area that is nowadays called Welschdörfli, just off the historic town center of Chur. In modern days archaeological excavations uncovered a complete Roman quarter. The authorities decided to preserve the excavations and to open them for public exhibition. Local Swiss architect Peter Zumthor was chosen as responsible for the design.

 


 

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