The Hardt Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Ferna%CC%81ndez 0 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Ferna%CC%81ndez 0 1080x675

Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico

Asher 8:34 pm 7:51 am

Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico

 

Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico. Mexican artist Pedro Reyes and his wife, fashion designer Carla Fernández designed a gorgeous house that is an exceptional example of Brutalist Beauty. The couple built their beautiful Home in Coyoacán, south of Mexico City, it is a peculiar structure that was envisioned as a dwelling for the caveman of the future. The source of inspiration for the concept are the ruins of a civilization, now extinct, which was more advanced than the one we’re living in now, according to the designers. Hammered concrete walls, chunky furniture from volcanic stone and an abundance of rich, overblown greenery all come together to form an architectural masterpiece. Part of the remarkable stone floor is inspired by the nearby Anahuacalli Museum, the “temple” designed by Rivera in 1957 as a depository for his collection of 60,000 pre-Hispanic artifacts. Elsewhere, hammered concrete floors and walls were inspired by the Mexican brutalists, in particular, 89-year-old Teodoro González de León, who built many landmarks across the Mexican capital.

 

 

Ancient Aztecs meet The Martian Chronicles in the form of hammered concrete walls, chunky furniture hewn from volcanic stone and an abundance of rich, overblown greenery. A “pyramid” at one end is Carla’s studio, a yard behind it will be Pedro’s. It’s currently a ramshackle plot occupied by the team of artisans that is helping finish the house. “The use of concrete is very canonical, very clichéd, but it has many possibilities,” says Reyes, pointing out the handmade bricks covered with a wax-like concrete paste, which he, and his team, developed specifically for this project.

 

 

The couple also designed much of the furniture, a series of chunky unusual constructs that are deemed artworks in their own right, while at the same time serving a functional purpose. The lava-stone master bath and basin and the concrete kitchen table are two of the most imposing pieces, but perhaps the centerpiece of the house is a ceiling light, made of copper tubes threaded through an electrical wire. The striking ceiling light is inspired by the work of Buckminster Fuller, as is a 4m-high geodesic dome being completed in the living room. Another distinctive piece of furniture is Reyes’ sign language-inspired “Mano-Sillas” chairs, that appear alongside international and Mexican midcentury classics from the likes of Charles and Ray Eames and Clara Porset, and simple rural pieces such as milking stools, leather butaque chairs and seats woven from palm fronds. “The technique was used by the Aztecs and has been recovered by the design-conscious, but not in any official way,” says Reyes. “It would be great to make them on a large scale in other raw materials”. Revisiting ancient indigenous skills and developing a modern Mexican language lies at the heart of Fernández’s work, in particular.

 

 

 

Between the master bedroom and the two children’s bedrooms, there is space for one of “the best hammocks in Mexico”. These are woven by women from cooperatives in Izamal in Yucatán and Calkiní in Campeche, take two months to make and can sleep a family of four. The multitude of cultural symbolism is no coincidence. Before becoming an artist, Reyes trained as an architect at the Ibero-American University in Mexico City. His plan in designing the house was to transform 1.000 square meters of a “1980s monstrosity” into a modern space that includes hints of all of Mexico’s many modern cultural aspects. Enjoy the best parts of this Brutalist Beauty in the gallery below.

 

Words via DesignIsThis

Photos by Edmund Sumner

 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

The Hardt Copper House II by Studio Mumbai Situated in Chondi Maharashtra India 1 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Copper House II by Studio Mumbai Situated in Chondi Maharashtra India 1 1080x675

Copper House II by Studio Mumbai situated in Chondi, Maharashtra, India

Asher 12:38 pm 4:01 pm

Copper House II by Studio Mumbai situated in Chondi, Maharashtra, India | The Hardt

 

Studio Mumbai / Copper House II from Daniele Marucci on Vimeo.

 

Copper House II by Studio Mumbai situated in Chondi, Maharashtra, India.  The Hortus conclusus unites within itself a marvelous assemblage of disparate aspects. It seeks to understand the landscape it denies, explain the world it excludes, bring in the nature it fears and summarise all this in an architectural composition. The Enclosed Garden, Rob Aben, Saskia de Wit. The severe flood of Mumbai and its hinterland in 2005 had marked its high-water mark on a pump-house that was extant to the site. After using it to register the datum for the house, pile foundations were put in and a slab was cast two feet above the high-water line. The central fill came from the excavation for the well, and around a court, the house grew. The language and logic of the building are located in three primary architectural moves. The first is the creation of two distinct blocks, varying in width by a foot, separated by the stone-paved courtyard on the ground, and united by the cupric roof plane at the upper level. The two blocks function as discrete personal spaces on the upper level, one is a singular space of bedroom and bath, the other has an additional study.

 

 

At the ground level, an indoor family room becomes an adjunct to the main living space which does not have the containment that the other more private spaces exhibit. This main space functions literally as the deck of the house, overlooking the landscape and the courtyard, creating a simultaneity of vistas, each of a different scale and access. The copper-covered private spaces at the upper level are positioned in mutual tension, with the guarantee of simultaneous intimacy and isolation, so essential to the domestic interior. This spatial strategy also allows for varying levels of communication, visual and otherwise, between the upper and lower spaces of the house. In Kerala, further south from Mumbai along the west coast of the Indian peninsula (as in many other regions), the courtyard was the center of the traditional house.

 


 

The central room formed by the courtyard flanked by pillars was called the naalukettu. But the entire structure, comprising the central hall and the four wings around was also commonly referred to as the naalukettu. This reference to the courtyard as the house itself, holds a clue to the development of the design for this house, as it evolved from being an embracing structure to one which opened out. The second definitive move is the layering of light through a series of material gestures, each one tuned to the direction that light takes and the need for changing degrees of privacy. This is articulated with screening devices made of fine netting framed in traditionally crafted wood, fluted glass which diffuses the light and greenery and hints at the absent city, and sliding and folding wooden windows, all of which allow for degrees of seclusion.

 

 

The walls are finished in a celadon-colored traditional plaster, smooth like human skin, and crackled like the ancient Chinese glaze, giving the transitory appearance of a fragmented ceramic container, rectilinear and encased with a lid of weathered copper. The continuous copper roof plane forms a secondary datum for the house, becoming a surface of potential occupation and cover. The last is the inclusion of the element of water, whether in the form of the monsoon rain which is relentless in its action on material and mood, or in the form of the well, the stream and the pool beyond the house. The seasonal ‘anxiety’ of the ground is addressed in the manner in which the paving is worked out within the courtyard in a continuous linear fashion and in a loose ring around the house, with undulations registering the flow of rainwater as it reaches for the nearest point of exit. The entrance portal of the building is a non-place. Sitting beneath the first upper copper-wrapped container, it becomes a space of pause. In this house, with its Hortus conclusus acting both as container and sieve, the exploration of the rites of retreat, passage and exclusion are tested again. The final gesture was housing the massive rock which came as a gift from the owner’s mother, leaving it for time to take over, as time inevitably will.

 

Photos Courtesy of Studio Mumbai

The video shot by Daniele Marucci shows the relationship between architecture and the environment, the nature that surrounds it, the context in which it is located and how it reacts to different weather conditions.
It was filmed in India in July 2012 with a Canon 5D Mark II, and was part of the exhibition of the BSI Swiss Architectural Award 2012, which opened in September at the Academy of Architecture in Mendrisio (Switzerland).

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 
The Hardt House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch Switzerland 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch Switzerland 1080x675

House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch, Switzerland

Asher 7:33 am 7:33 am

House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch, Switzerland | The Hardt

 

House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch, Switzerland. This holiday house is located in the middle of the village of Vnà in the Lower Engadine. The particular challenge of the project was to bridge the divide between the old-world charm of the village and the modern flair embodied in a holiday house for an internationally successful art gallery owner. The aim was to develop a formal language which had certain proximity to traditional Engadine architecture and yet remained immediately recognizable as contemporary without being conservatively romanticized. In urban planning terms, the building closed a permanent gap in the village structure whilst the dimensions correspond to those of the adjacent houses.

 

 

Over time the village was periodically hit by fires, meaning that the original timber structures disappeared and were replaced by the stone houses that give the settlement its indigenous character today. The use of concrete as the main building material pays justice to this stone appearance. Only the inner walls and ceilings of the living and bedrooms are lined in plywood paneling to give the warmth and comfort of the room and as an approximation of the traditional sheltered feeling of a mountain dwelling. The solidness of the ground story is likewise a common regional feature. The archaic is also reflected in the construction with the use of gas concrete, allowing the walls to be erected homogenously without layering. The resulting massiveness of the walls has a great similarity with traditional means of building and enabled the typical corbels of the window reveals. The windows are arranged according to interior criteria, giving the façade an informal appearance typical of old Engadine houses. The depth of the reveals creates an attractive play of shadows and roots the building firmly in the region.

 

Finally, the traditional and modernist elements of the sculptural volume blend into a unified whole. The interplay between simplicity, rural straightforwardness and contemporary comfort and architectural sophistication lend the house a very specific character, which pays respect to the village without being obsequious.

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

The Hardt Located in Vermoim Portugal Igreja Velha Palace by Visioarq Aquitectos 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Located in Vermoim Portugal Igreja Velha Palace by Visioarq Aquitectos 1080x675

Located in Vermoim, Portugal, Igreja Velha Palace by Visioarq Aquitectos

Asher 11:34 am 11:34 am

Located in Vermoim, Portugal, Igreja Velha Palace by Visioarq Aquitectos | The Hardt

 

Located in Vermoim, Portugal, Igreja Velha Palace by Visioarq Aquitectos. in 1881, in Vermoim – Vila Nova de Famalicão, the Igreja Velha Palace was for many decades the mansion of an important farm, baroque style with two castellated towers and an attached chapel, the neo-gothic style S. Francisco de Assis chapel.  With the introduction of many additions and volumetries that deprived the complex of its features, this project came across many challenges regarding the constructive and functional aspects.  The intervention asserted the valorization of the set through the volumetric and spatial recovering, the reparation of the degraded constructive elements and the asymmetries created throughout its history. The expansion, with a new volume built to host events, complementary to the use of the palace, was also a listed objective for this project. 

 

 

The preservation of this patrimony inserted in the local cultural landscape was possible due to demanding recovery criteria that integrated the new volume. Therefore, this arises embraced by the confining elements of the old structure, respecting the alignments, promoting and reinforcing the pedestrian axis that runs through the center of the palace and ending at a corbel protruding volume that welcomes the visitors of Igreja Velha Palace. The old/new counterpoint asserted itself through the mixture between local and more modern materials and original constructive processes, maintaining achromatic and volumetric harmony of the landscape. The COR-TEN steel that covers much of the building, the granite, the wood, and the concrete embody the concept inspired in the old local granaries. 

 

 

The granary is a traditional rural structure, normally made of stone and wood, with the function of drying the corn through the side cracks and at the same time protecting ir from being destroyed by rodents through the ground elevation. In mainland Portugal, they can be found particularly in the North region and are subject to ethnographic and tourist interest. The indoor/outdoor relationship is stated by large windows without compromising the energy efficiency of the building. It is in this context that the slatted wood was introduced – evoking the local granaries – as well as the asymmetric flap in two planes, which delimits the entrance of the event buildings in a transition between the interior and the exterior.  Finally, as to the landscaping, the existing vegetation variety was capitalized by the delimitation of paths and squares in granite, in a contemplative attitude towards the surrounding landscape.

 

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

 

 

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The Hardt Perivolas Suite. Perivolas Santorini. %C2%A9 Perivolas 1 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Perivolas Suite. Perivolas Santorini. %C2%A9 Perivolas 1

Perivolas by Manos Psychas and his wife Nadia located at the entrance of the village of Oia, Santorini, Greece

Asher 3:24 am 8:30 am

Perivolas by Manos Psychas and his wife Nadia located at the entrance of the village of Oia, on the cliffside overlooking the caldera in Santorini, Greece | The Hardt

 

Perivolas by Manos and his wife Nadia located at the entrance of the village of Oia, on the cliffside overlooking the caldera in Santorini, Greece. In the 19th century the Psychas family, like many other Santorini families, developed through trade in the noted wines of the island a connection with Odessa on the Black Sea.  Manos Psychas, a sea captain, was born in Odessa, but when his job as captain of the Greek navy brought him to Santorini in the late 1950s he determined to renew his ties with his family’s island. In 1969 Manos and his wife Nadia purchased a piece of a cliff with cave dwellings and stables in the Perivolas area of the cliff top village of Oia. They had the vision of creating an idyllic retreat on their beloved island.  Faithful to the tradition of Santorini’s unique architecture they have restored a group of 300-year-old caves that were once the homes of local fishermen and farmers.  With the help of native craftsmen and using the local stone, this historical setting has been gradually transformed into a luxurious complex of 20 very individual suites. This was the beginning of Perivolas.

 

 

 

Perivolas is located at the entrance of the village of Oia, on the cliffside overlooking the caldera. It is a 30-minute drive north from Santorini Airport and the port to Oia (Ia).i and offers 5-star accommodation in addition to a Jacuzzi, free Wi-Fi, and a Turkish steam bath. Popular amenities, such as a sauna and an outdoor pool, make for an enjoyable stay in Oia.  Guests can soak up the sun on the terrace or have a drink at the bar. For a fast and effortless arrival and departure experience, guests can take advantage of the express check-in/check-out feature. Guests can also admire sea views from the on-site fitness center. All of the romantic rooms at Perivolas Hotel feature a spa bath, a CD player and a hairdryer. Each includes a private bathroom with slippers and bathrobes.  Those staying at the hotel can sample Greek and Mediterranean cuisines at the on-site restaurant, conveniently situated for those who want to stay nearby at mealtime. A selection of cafés and restaurants can also be found in the area.  The hotel enjoys a superb location, allowing guests easy access to a range of popular attractions. The helpful staff at the tour desk are available to book and organize activities in Oia.

Learn more about this amazing hotel on their site here

 

 

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The Hardt %E2%80%9CHouse Gepo%E2%80%9D by Wittaya  Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of %E2%80%9CHouse Gepo%E2%80%9D by Wittaya

House GePo by OYO

Asher 7:09 pm 7:09 pm

House GePo (2012) by OYO located in Wijgmaal, Belgium | The Hardt

 

House GePo (2012) by OYO located in Wijgmaal, Belgium. This stunning render has a floor plan of the 1,938 ft² (180 m²) house has a very open vibe to it, mostly due to the heavy use of steel in the framing and elsewhere. OYO chose for a minimalistic approach, omitting fancy details. They believe there is no need for over the top extras and find simple minimalistic interiors to be the gold standard. I wouldn’t argue with that person. This and other choices result in a low budget home that sticks perfectly to the basic idea of living. The house functions in a very open-minded and opportunistic way. Every room in this house is connected and ready to absorb the creativity of its residents.