Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor

 

 

 

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor located in Chur, Switzerland | The Hardt

 

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor located in Chur, Switzerland. Peter Zumthor is a Swiss architect I put right up there with Tadao Ando as my all time favorite. Mr. Zumthor is responsible for designing a piece of architecture so stunning, it made me rethink the entire concept of what a building actually is, from a very rudimentary basis. The building is the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria by Peter Zumthor. I’ll do a post here and a full post on the site this week. But I digress, one of the first big projects for the 2009 Pritzker Prize-winning architect Peter Zumthor was this protective pavilion built to cover the remains of two Roman buildings. Built in 1985-86 and located in the capital of the Swiss canton of Graubünden.       

 

 


 

Chur is no less than the oldest town in Switzerland: the first settlements found at the site date to 3.500BC. In 15BC the Roman Empire conquered the village and designated Chur (Curia Raetorum) to be the capital of their new funded Roman province of Curia – hence the name Chur.  In those days the location at the right shore of the Rhine River was a strategic crossroad where several of the major Alpine transit routes came together before continuing down river. The Romans inhabited the area that is nowadays called Welschdörfli, just off the historic town center of Chur. In modern days archaeological excavations uncovered a complete Roman quarter. The authorities decided to preserve the excavations and to open them for public exhibition. Local Swiss architect Peter Zumthor was chosen as responsible for the design.

 


 

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Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin

Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin

Located in Mallorca, Spain Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin | The Hardt

 

Located in Mallorca, Spain Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin. This vacation house for a German art dealer is set in an almond grove on the island of Mallorca, with views of sea and mountains. The office’s first full architectural project, the design explores ways of achieving a quality of proportion in outside space more usually associated with interiors. The composition of the atrium is emphatically vertical, the exaggerated height of the walls dramatized by the narrowness of the slot opening. As the design brings together certain conventions of interior and exterior spaces, so it plays with the opposition of raw nature and the formality of architecture, pigments from the soil being used to tint the render. The house is currently used as a vacation rental. Check the seasonal rates + a music video shot at the how on the next page, following the photo gallery.

via John Pawson

 

In partnership with Claudio Silvestrin

Project Team
Crispin Osborne

Photography
Richard Bryan

via John Pawson

 

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Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect located in Urada, Niigata, Japan | The Hardt

 

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect located in Urada, Niigata, Japan. The project was initiated following the collapse of the original Australia House (a 100-year-old Japanese farmhouse). It is essentially a disaster recovery project, but of a cultural type. The structure has been overdesigned so it can function as a refuge during future disasters.

Less than one year from the announcement of a competition to completion of construction. This required fantastic groundwork from the Australian Embassy, Tokyo, and rapid construction by the local contractors, Iizuka Constructions and Onojeima Constructions. Simple clear geometry that creates possibilities, rather shutting them down through excessive architectural authorship… The main gallery focusses on the embankment, rather than the dramatic valley view. In this way the embankment, tilted up, becomes the third wall of the gallery, creating opportunities for artists and curators to engage with the landscape.

 

 


 

By focussing on an ordinary view, rather than an extraordinary view, it seeks to remind us of the value of ordinary, local things, post GFC and post great east Japan Earthquake. A unique collaboration between artist and architect to embed a permanent work within the gallery. The work can be concealed by a large cedar clad panel. It is my hope that a new permanent work will be embedded in the gallery space at each Triennale, so in 15 years time you could walk into the space and reveal 6 compelling permanent works.

 


 

The design resonates with the many utilitarian structures in the region, a steep roof, direct expression and located close to the road so as to be easy to access during snowfall. I did not so much as reference these buildings when I was designing it, but followed the same basic logic that they follow. The steeply pitched roof form rises to the daikoku-bashira (king post), creating a tall gallery space within a compact volume. Despite its size (120 sqm), this building conveys an institutional quality, although it also has the ambiguous presence of a rural structure and an art object.

 

© Brett Boardman

 


 

 

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TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN

TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN

TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN located in Long Feng Lu, Nanhu Qu, Jiaxing Shi, Zhejiang Sheng, China | The Hardt

 

TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN located in Long Feng Lu, Nanhu Qu, Jiaxing Shi, Zhejiang Sheng, China. It is commonly considered that people cannot enjoy work and life at the same time, although they are hardly separated from each other completely. Through breaking the routines and bringing a “home” into the workspace, JACKY.W DESIGN created an open and multifunctional living experience space for the fashion brand TKSTYLE BOUTIQUE. At the entrance, several clusters of dry corn stalks are placed by the wall, bringing nature into the space. The large 360-degree revolving door neutralizes the space temperament dominated by cement with its warm wooden texture.

The designers gave full play to the structure and height (8 meters) of the original space and ingeniously integrated functional areas for working, reception, fitness, and conference, etc. into the two-story space without rigid partitions. There are windows in each wall, which ensures sufficient natural lights to penetrate to the space, thereby resulting in a bright and airy environment.  The open layout of the space made it possible for the designers to apply the concept of co-living and cooperative working. Integrating household settings with the workspace in a harmonious way requires quality execution of design and sensibility to details. The design features an industrial style, combined with the exquisite upholstered furniture and adornments, making the overall space rough, simple yet delicate.

 

 


 

The flourishing plants highlight the original beauty of the concrete extensively exposed on the floor, walls, beams, and pillars. The designers tried nine times for the testing and proofing of cast-in-place cement slabs, so as to ensure the stability of the texture. The strict selection and utilization of materials are also manifested in the ultra -white glass and ultra-thin marble slabs with white patterns exported from Spain. With the ingenious application of colors and lines, the designers optimized the spatial texture and experience. If we’re lucky enough to be engaged in an industry that interests us, work will become a joy. This is exactly true for TKSTYLE BOUTIQUE and JACKY.W DESIGN. Perhaps this is the reason that the TKSTYLE Office came into being, which improves work to a new level — “life is work”.

 

 

Second-floor office. Image © Wenyao Photography

 


 

 

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House in Monterey by Tadao Ando

House in Monterey by Tadao Ando

House in Monterey by the GOAT Tadao Ando located In Monterrey, Mexico | The Hardt

 

TADAO ANDO – Trailer from film moment on Vimeo.

 

 

Set within the Hardt of Cumbres National Park, House in Monterey by Tadao Ando located In Monterrey, Mexico. The house built by the Japanese architect, Tadao Ando, Pritzker Prize in 1995, hovers between heaven and earth. A concrete construction, graphic and aerial, facing a site which it restores the spectacular beauty.  Built in the middle of the national park, the house escapes the tropical mist that sometimes hangs over the city, while enjoying the spectacular view of the Sierra de las Mitras. To convince the architect who was initially reluctant to engage in such an adventure, the owners of the place, Alberto and Alejandra Fernandez passed through the Embassy of Japan in Mexico City. “We convinced him by explaining to him in a simple letter that if he realized this house, it was as if he were participating in the construction of a small part of paradise on earth. “The couple then appealed to the construction company Paralelo, to carry out the main work. Because there was no company in Mexico that could meet the demands and fame of the work of Tadao Ando. Two experts from the Japanese agency, Yukio Tanaka and Kohei Sugita came specifically to Monterrey to meet the Parelalo workers on site. Construction began in 2009 and was completed in 2011.

 

 


 

While most of the rooms face landscaping, the master suite and the large living room on the ground floor give on the terrace of the pool, whose floor, paved with Indonesian granite tiles, is tinged with green when it is wet, thus counterbalancing the general monochromatic tone. In this number of rooms despite everything limited in view of the surface of the place, sobriety enacts its serene law, the sense of emptiness also inhabited, the quest for silence, contemplation. Wooden flooring, concrete walls, steel structures and large windows to abolish any border with the outside. The stroke of genius is then to have articulated the plan of the house around a monumental library. Covering all the part of a wall, its amounts, declined in a dark tone, contrast with the light returned by the bay windows. From the second level, the view of the valley is magnificent.

 

 


 

The shelves fill up as and when, according to the inspirations, the moments, the stays, the journeys. If this library became the heart of the house, its rallying point, a bit like a hearth, because in this couple with three children, books have replaced televisions and computers, it also acts as an intermediary between living areas: the entrance, the corridor and the master bedroom located on the first level, and the reception rooms on the ground floor including a kitchen dining room, a large living room, a master suite, the children’s rooms There is also a wine cellar and a gym. The grandeur and simplicity of this almost celestial architectural rigor definitely force respect.

 

 


 

It blends in with nature unless it’s the other way around. Overlooking the city of Monterrey, the house that Tadao Ando designed for a couple of Mexican nature lovers, revives the philosophy of its iconic achievements, the Church of Light in Ibaraki, the Langen Foundation in Neuss, Germany, the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis, Missouri: Achieving cerebral architecture without being abstract, spiritual without being mystical. In short, the cult of simplicity elevated to the rank of ethics. For the plan, this serene observer of the order of things was inspired by the architectural tradition of the country of the Rising Sun, the planing beauty of Japanese gardens. The approach that is found everywhere here since the vertiginous living space of one thousand five square meters echoes the size of the surrounding landscape. With its angles and terraces, its very graphic porticoes, its quadrilateral shape inspired by Mexican haciendas and its swimming pool that seems to be suspended, the house is an architectural performance in osmosis with rocks and vegetation, and especially with the cosmic tones. of the site.

 


 

In order not to disturb the natural order of things, the branches of certain trees even cross the terraces, as if the flora were gaining the upper hand. the house is an architectural performance in osmosis with rocks and vegetation, and especially with the cosmic tones of the site. In order not to disturb the natural order of things, the branches of certain trees even cross the terraces, as if the flora were gaining the upper hand. the house is an architectural performance in osmosis with rocks and vegetation, and especially with the cosmic tones of the site. In order not to disturb the natural order of things, the branches of certain trees even cross the terraces, as if the flora were gaining the upper hand.

 


 

 

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Santa Clara 1728 by Aires Mateus

Santa Clara 1728 by Aires Mateus

Santa Clara 1728 by Aires Mateus located in Lisbon, Portugal | The Hardt

 

 

 

 

 

Santa Clara 1728 by Aires Mateus located in Lisbon, Portugal. Love this space, housed inside an 18th-century pile on one of Lisbon’s most romantic squares, Santa Clara 1728 is the fourth in a string of slick design-led properties from hotelier João Rodrigues. Perched atop one of the city’s seven hills, overlooking the Pantheon and the Tagus River beyond, the hotel has been designed by magicians of minimal Aires Mateus, whose clean, modern interiors are refreshing trimmings to the building’s ancient walls; worn, limestone stairs lead to the guestrooms, where coarse linens, pale woods, and furnishings by designer Antonio Citterio come together in a neutral palette boosted by a graceful duck egg blue.

 

 

The goal was to construct a building that reflects the living experience of the city. A search, not done by the reproduction of traditional elements, but by a recombination of elements, materials, atmospheres, and proportions, to bring back this idea of living. A plain architecture, that combines few elements, while striving for quality in the use of real materials. An idea of authenticity and, therefore, an idea of timelessness.


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