The Hardt Acola%CC%81 Store 2016 by Va%CC%83o exterior Acolá Store (2016) by Vão Architecture Brick Commercial Building Courtyard Decor Design Minimal Wood  Vão Sao Paulo Pedro Kok brazil   Image of Acola%CC%81 Store 2016 by Va%CC%83o exterior

Acolá Store (2016) by Vão

Asher 12:41 pm 12:41 pm

Acolá Store (2016) by Vão located in Rua Padre Carvalho, Pinheiros, São Paulo, Brazil | The Hardt

 

Acolá Store (2016) by Vão located in Rua Padre Carvalho, Pinheiros, São Paulo, Brazil. The desire to bring light into the store guided the first project decisions of replacing a part of the roof whose structure was compromised, by a glass ceiling and visually integrating the levels by partially demolishing the upper slab. In addition, to illuminate the entire store, the coverage provides for the exchange of natural ventilation which, added to the internal garden, brings great thermal comfort to the space. The invitation to design the new Acolá Store was received with great happiness because, due to the years of friendship between us and its creators, we have closely followed the trajectory of the brand since its beginning in 2012. In the first visit to the new address, a former loft of triangular plan located a few meters from the old store, we faced a tapered, wet and dark place, since there were only four small openings to light and ventilate the entire space

 

 

The break given by the double height ceiling garden arranged the program in two moments: in the first one, closest to the street, are located the store [ground] and the office [mezzanine]; In the second, at the bottom, a hydraulic core containing all wet areas, sanitary [ground] and pantry [upper level]. It is also in the garden that the flows between the levels are organized through the ladder and footbridge that crosses the void. Amid the store’s free plan, a volume was strategically positioned to create different environments such as the reception area, clothes rack and lounge. The fact that it is loose, without touching the ceiling or walls, allow the circulation between these environments to be fluid and uninterrupted. In this volume are grouped an auxiliary stock, an exhibitor and two changing rooms with pivotal doors which divide, integrate or expand the area according to the need of the moment. In the mezzanine above, where all the walls have been demolished, the spatial organization is also given through another volume, the large stock that divides the open areas [workbench and board meetings] of the closed areas [private room and warehouse].

 

© Pedro Kok

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Zirahuén House by Intersticial Arquitectura situated in Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico

Asher 5:50 pm 8:14 am

Zirahuén House by Intersticial Arquitectura situated in Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico | The Hardt

 

Zirahuén House (2016) by Intersticial Arquitectura situated in Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico. Casa Zirahuen is the first stage of a two twin house project that creates a small dwelling in a residential area in Querétaro’s periphery. Facing the residential monotony in typology and isolation of the area generated between the 7 meters high adjoining walls, the proposal’s idea based on shaping a different integration to the site, one that dignifies and offers better ways of living in its outside and inside space. Some of the principal challenges to solve were to create a product that makes use of passive design strategies, local constructive methods and a commercial competitive scheme which is sensitive to a complex real estate context.  The house works around a main guiding axis that splits and distributes the public program in the ground floor and the private program in the first level. The use of a central patio works as a natural lantern that articulates and ventilates, a witness to the house’s everyday life.

 

 


 

 
The design of the project is thought to be versatile enough in order to adapt to the user’s needs. The study of areas and proportion of living spaces, added to the rational constructive modulation gives the home the option of a flexible and controlled growth (spanned in stages to equip the house with 2 to 4 bedrooms, optional TV/family room, and additional outside spaces). The exposed materials reveal its constructive honesty, the polished concrete, and bare brick reflect the quality of artistry and craftsmanship the region has to offer. Its textures and tones respond to a natural palette found in the local area, Querétaro’s semi-desert context.

 

© Marcos Betanzos

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

The Hardt Musical Studies Centre 2002 by ENSAMBLE STUDIO located in Santiago de Compostela Acolá Store (2016) by Vão Architecture Brick Commercial Building Courtyard Decor Design Minimal Wood  Vão Sao Paulo Pedro Kok brazil   Image of Musical Studies Centre 2002 by ENSAMBLE STUDIO located in Santiago de Compostela

Musical Studies Centre (2002) by ENSAMBLE STUDIO

Asher 11:21 am 11:21 am

Musical Studies Centre (2002) by ENSAMBLE STUDIO located in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain | The Hardt

 

Musical Studies Centre (2002) by ENSAMBLE STUDIO located in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain. The project of the Musical Studies Center in Santiago de Compostela is located in the Vista Alegre plot of land, one of the most relevant green areas in the surroundings of the old quarter of Santiago. Described as a university park, the Vista Alegre plot of land hosts a group of buildings link to activities related to academic and research practices. Here it’s possible to find the House of Europe, the Advanced Studies Center, the IDEGA (a university research center) and the Center for Musical Studies, dedicated to postgraduate studies for musical improvement, intended for the training of the Galician Orchestra musicians. The proposal has its origins in a competition asking for the insertion of a pavilion which program demanded the development of classrooms for the education of music, with defined volumetry, highness, occupation and materials, in a non-symmetric exercise, as it is set against the pavilion built by Portela, made of the same materials and similar dimensions.

 


 

The perception of the building at different scales defines levels of comprehension. From the distance, the building lets itself fall on the land. It sticks, without any continuity, to a carpet of green grass that makes up the surface of the plot of land, cutting out its silhouette in the space of the garden in a strong definitive way, like a rock with cubic will. If we look from a middle distance point, we gaze the border, the limit that before shaped an almost perfect form, leads to the lack of definition; the trace of a broken line appears, distorting edges, and a superficial vibration of light, material and shadow fixed to a rhythm of seven parts. We move closer and the shape is broken; the pieces jump, expressing its abrasive materiality and defining holes which provide the constructive scales of the building, incisions of light that tear the facade that saw from the distance transform the hole into a shadow which talks about subtraction of mass by light in a vertical element, while the two big perforations are a direct result of the big interior volume.

 

 

The masonry granite work of the façade it’s made of stones opened “on the contrary side”, searching for the spontaneous natural surface of “stereomity” which allows the granite to be ripped easier. It’s a constructive system that uses techniques of the drill to break the piece of stone, using as well the border sides, but in the context of a reconsideration labor of the constructive process of opening and cut off the stone. There’s a search of the constructive expression of the stone, as we’ve learned from the history, going back to Egypt and Rome. From the functional point of view, the acoustic requirements of the different rooms where determinant on the design. This is the reason why the spaces which require bigger acoustic needs, are linked to a big buried concrete basement, which confirms the settling of the building, the accesses and regulates the slopes of the topography. These are the bigger classrooms (auditorium, electro-acoustic, percussion rooms…), capable of hosting a large number of students and eventual audience.

 


 

The expression of the project comes from the contraposition and duality, that in the scale, the timbre and its materials, build the space reaching complexity. The distortion, superimposed to the harmony, evokes the purity of both spatial conditions bringing about interest both in material and spatial terms. Beyond canons, the building wants to develop architectonic concepts within a simple composition and geometry, taking in the spatial resonance from the echoes of its limits, that in the outside are represented by the carballeira, the garden, the water and the Galician light, and in the interior the stone surfaces cut from the outside (or maybe they exploit from the confrontation with it), and configure the space. The aims on the project are a deeply rooted to Galicia architecture, considering its cultural and atmosphere particularities, emphasizing the memory of the place. It seems that the building was always there.

Photos by Roland Halbe

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


The Hardt Private House by Found Associates99  Acolá Store (2016) by Vão Architecture Brick Commercial Building Courtyard Decor Design Minimal Wood  Vão Sao Paulo Pedro Kok brazil   Image of Private House by Found Associates99

Private House by Found Associates

Asher 1:02 am 9:27 am

Located in Cotswolds, England surrounded by nearly perfect landscaping, with green rolling grass and a lake framed by tall and lush trees, Private House by Found Associates | The Hardt

 

Located in Cotswolds, England surrounded by nearly perfect landscaping, with green rolling grass and a lake framed by tall and lush trees, Private House by Found Associates. Designed by London based architecture firm Found Associates, the house is an extension of an 18th century stone cottage. The structure extends from both ends of the old cottage but doesn’t fully envelope it. This design allows both the cottage and extension to feel like unique volumes living in harmony. Private House also sits harmoniously with the surrounding landscape: the large structure dwells low on the site so as not to block the picturesque vistas of the rolling green hills. The clean, minimal nature of the home lends itself to feeling like an art gallery. However, in the absence of artwork, the house and surrounding landscape are the objects on exhibit. I think minimal homes tend to make the best vacation homes: one can truly relax in a peaceful setting free of distractions.

Private House won the RIBA National Award in 2012 and was nominated for the RIBA Manser Medal.

 

 

Photos by: Hufton + Crow

 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 

 

The Hardt xHoratio Street by Steven Harris and Rees Roberts992384 Acolá Store (2016) by Vão Architecture Brick Commercial Building Courtyard Decor Design Minimal Wood  Vão Sao Paulo Pedro Kok brazil   Image of xHoratio Street by Steven Harris and Rees Roberts992384

Horatio Street by Steven Harris / Rees Roberts & Partners

Asher 4:16 pm 11:21 am

Horatio Street by Steven Harris / Rees Roberts & Partners in New York, NY | The Hardt

Horatio Street by Steven Harris / Rees Roberts & Partners in New York, NY. The interiors of this 1840s four-story townhouse with rear garden and the sleek glass-walled penthouse was designed for a family based in Rio de Janeiro who has an eclectic art collection and unabashed love of color. The dining room, lined with subtle olive-grey painted shelves for art books and lit by a custom copper disc chandelier, houses a Brazilian antique rosewood table brought to life by padded vintage Jean Prouve chairs recovered in a striking pink fabric. The pale grey-walled living room which looks out over the garden below is highlighted by furnishings in lavender, putty, and black; the fuchsia and patterned accents here were a special request for the family’s daughter. The sleek lines and cool materials of the glass rooftop penthouse complete with fireplace, wet bar, and outdoor terrace were tempered with plush custom bench cushions and pillows; this space provides a magical setting for enjoying views of the High Line, Standard Hotel, and West Village cityscape.

 

 

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

https://thehardt.com/architecture/riverbank-house-kawabe-no-sumika-by-ma-style/

https://thehardt.com/landscape/melbourne-garden-myles-baldwin/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/south-5th-residence-alterstudio-architecture/

 

 


 

The Hardt MARFA TEXAS POOL Acolá Store (2016) by Vão Architecture Brick Commercial Building Courtyard Decor Design Minimal Wood  Vão Sao Paulo Pedro Kok brazil   Image of MARFA TEXAS POOL

The 7 Most Fire Modern To Rustic Houses You’ll See In Marfa, Texas

Asher 12:27 pm 11:21 am

ARCHITECTURE  & INTERIOR DESIGN

The 7 Most Fire Houses In Marfa, Texas

When Donald Judd began his Marfa project in the early 1970s, he would never have predicted the near-mythic status it would end up achieving. The small town of 2,000 residents is 20 miles from the next town and nearly three hours from the nearest major airport, yet it features a contemporary art museum, the Chinati Foundation, and the highly instagrammable Prada Marfa, and attracts artists, celebrities, and urbanites looking for a simpler life—or the latest music festival—all year-round. Besides the austerely beautiful high-desert landscape, this creative enclave is also well known for is its minimalist interiors, architecture, and furniture. Last month, the Monacelli Press published Marfa Modern: Artistic Interiors of the West Texas High Desert, Helen Thompson’s look at 21 homes that illustrate the former water-stops sky, light, and unique sense of isolation. Here, a preview of seven of the homes featured inside.

The Coolest Pool

Trendsetting Austin hotelier Liz Lambert renovated Marfa’s 1950s-era Thunderbird Hotel into a boutique hotel, transformed a large plot of land into El Cosmico, a “nomadic hotel and campground”, and spiffed up an adobe bunkhouse that used to belong to her uncle for herself in the meantime. A water tank is a short jeep ride from the house—it’s her favorite spot for a quick swim and a breathtaking desert view.
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“Trendsetting Austin hotelier Liz Lambert renovated Marfa’s 1950s-era Thunderbird Hotel into a boutique hotel.”

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Pop Art in the Desert

Houston-based architectural designer Barbara Hill, a red-haired “Miss Texas, 1956”, prefers to remove decorative and architectural elements rather than add them. She spent a year and a half transforming this adobe building, which had been a private dance hall, grocery, and candy store in turn.
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The house is located downtown and passersby, curious to see what’s beyond the wall, often peer over the top for a look. Their curiosity is rewarded by a view of a fire pit that anchors the front yard, which was created by Houston and Marfa-based metal artist George Sacaris. Marfa resident and landscape architect Jim Martinez designed the garden.
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Hill used birth plywood on both the ceiling and the floor of her home, for visual continuity. White plaster walls add luminous glamour to the rough-and-ready décor. Deep-set windows throughout soften Marfa’s glaring midday light and suggest that the hefty structure is here to stay.
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In another 864-square-foot adobe house in Marfa, Hill removed acoustical-tile ceiling in the two front rooms to reveal three additional feet above. Hill installed pink neon light behind the seven-foot-tall Warhol that presides over the dining table and its black and white Bertoia chairs. The bar cart in the kitchen is from Kuhl-Linscomb in Houston.
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“Marfa, Texas Has Really Come Into Its Own As A Central Hub For A Flourishing Creative Art Scene.” – Asher Hardt

Earthy Meets Modern

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King and Lisa Grossman purchased this century-old adobe building from Barbara Hill; she used it as a weekend retreat but it was once a lawyer’s office and later, a beauty parlor. Two delicate-looking steel rods stretch across both edges of the room’s width—these necessary structural elements are much stronger than they look and give the adobe lateral support. The hay bale coffee table is by The Art Guys, and a pair of Charles and Ray Eames sofas flank the table.
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A long French work table, designed by Barbara Hill, now makes an inviting dining table. Blackened steel cabinets are a dramatic counterpoint to the luminous white plaster walls throughout.

2.0 Sliding Doors

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“The chairs at the dining table were made as part of a Works Progress Administration project in the 1930s,” says Helen. “The green hand-built chair belonged to Martinez’s great-grandmother.”

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The 80-degree angle floor plan of the home is a nod to Jim Martinez’s grandmother whose New Mexico home had the same east-facing floor plan.

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“The chairs at the dining table were made as part of a Works Progress Administration project in the 1930s,” says Helen. “The green hand-built chair belonged to Martinez’s great-grandmother.

The Hardt Marfa Texas Architecture992 Acolá Store (2016) by Vão Architecture Brick Commercial Building Courtyard Decor Design Minimal Wood  Vão Sao Paulo Pedro Kok brazil   Image of Marfa Texas Architecture992

Color That Pops

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When Houston interior designer Marlys Tokerud made the decision to purchase a 1904 adobe house in 1999, she planned to tear down the 550-square-foot pink stucco frame house also on the lot. But Tokerud soon realized she could renovate the little house to live in while she remodeled the main house and soon found oak flooring and a perfectly preserved longleaf pine ceiling that had been the underside of the original roof. A horse trough serves as a tub in the master bath, where vintage blue bottles line a concrete shelf lit by a slit window in the plaster walls.
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In the main house, elements such as the 10-foot-high ceilings, 14-inch walls, and painted wood doors were kept intact. Longleaf pine floors were used elsewhere in the house. Not long after Tokerud and her partner, Rick Houser, finished renovating, however, another fire broke out in the kitchen. The repairs offered an opportunity for upgrades, such as plaster walls, discreetly recessed track lighting, and multiple coats of a glossy paint on the ceiling. Houser built a kitchen island out of half a bowling lane imported from El Paso and brought in industrial lighting form his Houston woodworking shop. In the living room, a Christian Liaigre chaise serves as an antidote to the circa 1904 house’s rustic underpinnings. Metal artist George Sacaris built the base for the pine dining table, which was formerly a Mexican door.

Gallery Living

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On the site of a former Volkswagen repair shop known as George’s Garage, Vilis Inde, a lawyer turned art collector and gallery owner, and his partner, Tom Jacobs, decided to build a gallery and residence. Pard Morrison’s fired-pigment-on-aluminum sculpture Schneewittchen, 2013, stands tall in a courtyard between the gallery side of the building and the residence. An orange chair by Donald Judd is just visible beyond, in the gallery. A grid pattern inlaid in the interior courtyard defines the space.
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This is a house built for living, but also for art. The all-white residence and gallery are designed to help it recede in an unobtrusive way—both from the perspective of the viewer in the street as well as from a visitor stepping inside. Box shapes play a dominant role in the gallery’s design, and squares appear as a recurring motif throughout the bedroom, as with the bookshelves and the chair.

Texture Play

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On a lot next to a gas station, on a highway a few blocks West of downtown, Jamey Garza, of Garza Marfa, built a 1200-square-foot cinder-block house covered in gray stucco for a Los Angeles-based couple looking to make a design connection in Marfa. Initially, the couple had wanted a roadhouse but decided on a private getaway after logistics and reality set in. Concrete floors, which were part of the original plan remained and exposed steel trusses and cypress ceilings cover the main room, which includes living, dining, sleeping, and cooking spaces. The casement windows wrap three sides of the room and were painted in a rich orange hue of auto body lacquer. White hard-plaster walls provide a luminous contrast to the velvety gray stucco on the facade. A screened porch on the Westside offers both protection from the sun and a destination for perfect breeze-catching.
This home was painstakingly remodeled over the course of eight years by Austin-based chef Terry Nowell. He added a bathroom and upstairs sleeping loft and modernized the kitchen. Nowell painted the portrait that hangs above the sofa and the red ladder he built that leads to a sleeping loft.
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A dried agave plant in a corner of the downstairs bedroom emphasizes the ceiling height (which Nowell raised from seven to ten feet). A “truth window” above the pairs of windows exposes the original adobe brick. Both inside and out, the adobe blocks are covered in cement. Nowell made the white pine bed, woodblock table, the desk, and the floor lamp. He also built the wood side table.
Witten by: LOUISE HART
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