2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda

2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda

Asher 12:08 am 12:08 am

2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda located in Santa Catarina, Mexico | The Hardt

 

2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda located in Santa Catarina, Mexico. A weekend house for a couple was set out in a wooden terrain with descending topography. The best views are located a few meters from the access, in the same place where a dip, that testifies the occasional passing of important quantities of water across the land, is situated. It is right there where we decided to set the house to facilitate the access as well as minimize the presence of the construction in the landscape. The original proposal was a bridge-house where a large volume, suspended over a ravine will connect the two stone garages supported on 3 points: the guest’s room, the staircase, and the grill area. A series of economic blows challenged the bridge project, however, the owner’s strong will to make the house a reality, even if it was just a part, did not give away.

 

A minimum version of the project that can grow over time is then proposed. The bridge volume is left for a second phase and the project includes only the construction of the 2 blocks for the bedrooms. The generous master bedroom becomes the living-dining room; the closet turns into the kitchen and the guest´s room becomes the new master bedroom. To achieve a congruent built volume these 2 interiors (2I) are proposed as simple and independent elements placed one on top of the other. The connections between them and the relationship with the surroundings generate 4 outdoor spaces (4E) to enjoy the landscape. 

 

The lower volume consists of a bedroom facing the forest, with a bathroom in the background. It is a semi-underground volume whose apparent concrete walls generate the garage on the upper floor. On these walls, a staircase is suspended from the garage giving access to the bedroom. The entrance is through the first of the exterior spaces: a patio crowned with a tree, limited by a series of walls that allow it to be treated as a small plaza. The upper volume contains a small living and dining room, a kitchen open towards the social spaces and a full bathroom that will allow the volume to function as a bedroom in the future. The block moves to the west to generate an access and remains suspended over the bedroom creating, on the lower floor, a second outdoor space: a covered terrace protected by the shade of the magnificent pine tree and cedars surrounding. 

 

 

The roof of the bedroom, which leads to the north towards the forest, generates a third open space: a small solarium which is accessed through the huge window that demarcates the room. To the south, a second staircase to access the rooftop is suspended from the house social volume. This fourth outer space allows enjoying the most impressive views of the land. The house resolves almost all the interior surfaces with natural concrete. The structural elements such as banked beams, retaining walls and stairs were left apparent; the polystyrene beam and vault roof, as well as the insulating panel loading walls, are flattened with a fine, polished finish. The floors were made also in concrete generating a neutral and clean aesthetic that underlines the beauty of the landscape.

 

The exterior spaces attached to the ground, such as the garage and the terraces of the bedroom, are resolved in local stone in a rustic finish. The solariums on top of the bedroom and rooftop use a polished concrete finish. The sober and pure materiality cleanses indoors and outdoors underlining the beauty of the landscape and converting it into the theme of the spaces. Nature activates the project, not only by framing it and creating contrast but by making the neutral volumes the surface where the shadows of a large number of trees encircling the house project, adding life to these small pieces that converse with the surroundings with small contemplation points. The relation between interiors and exteriors establishes a new dialog with the woods and the mountains.

 

© FCH Fotografía  

Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada

Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada

Asher 11:52 pm 11:58 pm

Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada | The Hardt

 

Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada. The split-level house, with an open plan contemporary dwelling, is located in a rural subdivision near Whitby. Surrounded by very traditional custom homes, this gem stands out with its’ clean lines, prominent roof lines and an elegant composition. Designed for a retired professional, both the function and flexibility of space played a large role in the layout of spaces. A double-height glazed atrium filled with bamboo trees at the entrance brings natural daylight into the lower level entertainment and recreation rooms. An elegant, open-riser concrete and steel stair accentuates this space, nestled between the tall vegetation and an indoor waterfall. The main living space encompasses an open kitchen, with a dining room, and a screened porch which has the ability to merge with the interior or the outside of the dwelling. The slightly lowered living room is fully glazed and is connected with an ipe balcony.

 

 


 

Elements of whitewashed Douglas Fir cedars and soffits, mahogany, concrete and glass appear throughout the house, providing a natural, yet timeless palette. The client, a vintage car collector needed a room to store his gems in an integrated, and fully glazed attached car garage, which looks out onto the surrounding ravine. Petaluma House features finished concrete floors throughout with radiant-in-floor heating and cooling. The house has ample daylight and provides a comfortable atmosphere with natural ventilation. The master ensuite, a spa-like nook is located within the master bedroom; a modern approach with a very open, yet natural feeling. Keeping age in mind, a pneumatic see-through elevator shaft was integrated into the design, connecting all levels and adding an industrial touch.

 

Photography by Adrian Ozimek

 


 

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House A (2018) by Alexis Dornier

House A (2018) by Alexis Dornier

Asher 9:56 am 9:57 am

House A (2018) by Alexis Dornier located in Ubud, Indonesia | The Hardt

 

House A (2018) by Alexis Dornier located in Ubud, Indonesia. The linear 4 story arrangement counteracts the steep slope of the site by becoming a bridge house. The central theme of the ensemble is combining two architectural expressions: the idea of a romantic ruin, strongly connected to the ground, and a light, fading, transparent structure holding a series of roofs-two images working with and against each other. The master deck is crowning the structure, continuing through a double height exterior living space. The silhouette is a sequence of five roofs of different lengths. Linear skylights and linear gaps between the roofs complete a play of bar code like light play, changing as the sun is making its way from east to west.

 

 

Courtesy of Alexis Dornier

 


 

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Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão

Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão

Asher 8:14 am 8:22 am

Located in Avaré, Brazil, Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão | The Hardt

 

Located in Avaré, Brazil, Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão. The Ownerless House nº 01 is the first of three contiguous lands bought by the client with the intent of building investment houses in Avaré, a city in the interior of São Paulo. The single-family housing projects usually turn to desires and particularities of the clients but in this case, the client being only an intermediary to the future resident, the program and space should be flexible enough to accommodate the most diverse families dynamics. Get at the link in bio to check the rest of the project. The entire project was designed not as an object but as a route back to the interior with alternating open and closed spaces where natural light and reflections change according to the time and the season. Viewed externally, the house presents itself as a sculpted recess into the built mass, where the leaning red wall directs the perspective to the beginning of the journey.

 

 


 

The living, dining and kitchen areas are spread out over a courtyard located in the center of the plan which, surrounded by large panels of glass, dilutes the limits by integrating them visually. Both the patio and its extension, a lowered floor of hydraulic tiles, are covered by a continuous pergola. These pergola elements were prefabricated individually on the bed and later assembled in order to facilitate assembly and save on shapes and struts. This technique was rescued from studies of the work of the Brazilian architect Rino Levi, where the architect uses the prefabricated elements of concrete in residences in the capital to create light entrances in the middle of the slab.

 

© Pedro Kok

 


 

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Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect

Asher 9:53 pm 9:53 pm

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States | The Hardt

 

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States. The Key Biscayne Residence developed in response to its sub-tropical island environment. Pools are the principle, and ever-present, organizing elements of the series of living spaces, providing a feeling of coolness in the bright Miami light. Moving through the house, the experiences shift from being outdoors in a vertical space that is enveloped with walls of clay louvers, to entering a horizontally organized living area surrounded by glass doors that can entirely open to breezeways and pools.

 

 


 

The Key Biscayne Residence is depictive of the Latin cultural environment that surrounds it, including the client for whom it was designed. The South Florida community has many Latin American residents and the intent was to design a contemporary, comfortable house within a condition inclusive of many Mediterranean-style homes that are embedded in these cultural conditions. As a result, many architectural elements are utilized that are inherent to the Latin tradition including patios, Portales (porches), and persianas (louvered screens). The use of materials and overall layout present a series of spatial experiences defined by light and shadow and permeable connections between interior and exterior. Implicitly interpreting the persianas, which filter light as well as mitigate heat, terracotta brick louver systems were selected in three types: a more traditional and regular horizontal pattern, pivoting vertical panels, and textural, more solid bricks.

 

The house itself is a series of interlocking and overlapping volumes with voids, allowing for spatial complexity and spaces that snake through the house. Because the floor level is elevated to be free from flooding, one must ascend to enter. The reflecting pools at the entry and visible pool at the rear of the house contribute to the sensory, floating quality of this private home.

 

© Michael Stavaridis

 


 

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The Cresta by Jonathan Segal

The Cresta by Jonathan Segal

Asher 8:27 pm 8:27 pm

The Cresta by Jonathan Segal located in the wealthy beach city of La Jolla, San Diego, CA | The Hardt

 

CRESTA from BREADTRUCK FILMS on Vimeo.

 

The Cresta by Jonathan Segal FAIA located in the wealthy beach city of La Jolla, San Diego, CA. The 5,300ft² (492 m²) home has 3-stories; 1 below and 2 above grade which are accented by floor to ceiling and large open expanses to the outdoors. The home constructed entirely out of “cast in place” concrete on a 5,000 ft²  (464 m²) lot. Adjacent to the front of the structure a reflecting and swimming pool has been integrated into the overall design of the project for thermal cooling and create the perception of floating.

 

 

Photos by © Matthew Segal

 


 

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