White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects

White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects

White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects situated in Kanazawa City, Japan | The Hardt

 

White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects situated in Kanazawa City, Japan, an area known for heavy snowfall. The white minimal house still features many external spaces, despite the weather. The house’s exterior appears as a plain white volume, with one surface interrupted by an aperture that creates the parking space and a covered entrance passage to protect the owners from the winter snowfall. This void continues around a corner, where it becomes a secluded courtyard visible from the open plan kitchen and living space through full-height windows.

 

White Cave House is a massive lump engraved by a series of voids interconnected in the shape of a kinked tube. The connection of voids – we call it Cave – is the theme of this house. Internal rooms are designed to enjoy the minimum views of Cave characterized by its whiteness. At the same time, this concept is also the practical solution to realize a courtyard house in Kanazawa city known for heavy snow in Japan. The client’s original request was a white minimally-designed house with many external spaces, such as a large snow-proof approach to the entrance, a roofed garage for multiple cars, a terrace facing to the sky, and a courtyard. Though a roofed entrance and a garage are desirable for a snowy place, it takes so many floor areas away from the internal rooms for the family, while space and the budget is limited. In addition, the courtyard style itself is not suitable to the snowy country because courtyards would be easily buried under snow.

 

 


 

To solve the problems, we proposed to connect these external spaces one another into a large single tube, or Cave, and have each part serve multiple purposes in order to make up for the space limitations. We designed Cave unstraight because it prevents passengers outside from seeing through, though it is not closed. By this arrangement, Cave takes a new turn for each part letting in the sunshine while protecting the privacy of the courtyard, the terrace, and the internal rooms. The family inside can enjoy the view of Cave changing its contrast throughout a day under the sunshine. Cave also serves as a route to remove snow from the external spaces in winter, otherwise, you would be at a loss with a lot of snow in the enclosed courtyard. In order to make Cave deserve its name more, we wondered if we could add the reflection of water to the house because we thought water is inseparable from white caves. We eventually figured out that the terrace was an appropriate site to place it.  The terrace covered by white waterproof FRP holds a thin layer of water like a white basin. On the terrace reflecting the sky view without obstacles, you may feel that Cave has brought you to another world far from the daily life.

 


 

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House N18 by DRTAN LM Architect

House N18 by DRTAN LM Architect

House N18 by DRTAN LM Architect located in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia | The Hardt

 

House N18 by DRTAN LM Architect located in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. No. 18 is a three-story green residence located in the suburb of Sunway Damansara, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. The site slopes up gradually from the street towards the rear, meeting the foot of an abrupt reinforced incline that marks the start of the nature reserve behind. The brief called for a sustainable green home for a large family with generous open living spaces to entertain guests and private rooms customized to each family member’s requirements. The house plan was conceived as a series of large halls based on 6m X 6m modules that are linked together both horizontally and vertically to create interlocking spaces. These are bound together by the raw off-form concrete structure and earthy clay brick screen walls. The resulting three-story box has spaces cut-into and cut-out of it to create high volume spaces, courtyards, nooks and hanging gardens.

 


 

The front arrival portico is supported on a formal series of large diameter sienna red steel columns. Beams that bear the roof garden above run across the slab in their exposed concrete form creating a visual landing strip upon arrival as the row of lights hidden behind each beam is unveiled file by file. A collage of concrete, brickwork, and timber becomes an intentional feature wall by the main entrance. A solitary concrete wall with a rectangular cut-out, flanks the right side of the driveway forming a private lawn that fronts the open living area beyond. The entry foyer and formal living space is a tall voluminous space with a large dragon ball light hanging in mid-air. This is an open space designed to promote natural ventilation and lighting and opens out unto the private front lawn. Even the bamboo garden beyond the kitchen is visible from the living hall – an openness that is visually and spatially liberating. The adjacent hall is the dining room that has sliding glass doors on both ends. One end opens into the poetic garden with a sculptural frangipani tree as a backdrop and a koi pond with a fountain in the forefront, and the other end opens to a forest of saplings in a bed of pebble stones. The kitchen and service yard is located to the rear of the house.

 

 


 

The sculptural stair wraps around an off-form structural wall that takes one through to all the upper levels. The stairwell acts as a lantern contained by a double glazed enclosure and illuminated by the moon-like wall lights. The double volume informal family hall is located on the first floor overlooking the fountain courtyard. A hanging roof garden with giant yucca trees sits on the roof of the front concrete portico. Hallways lead to the various bedrooms. The master bedroom sits on the second floor with a zen exercise and tea room. Shoji screens replace window blinds and tatami mats line the floor in the room that is connected to a Japanese garden terrace.

 


 

The western façade is protected by a wraparound metal box louver sunscreen. The house is totally cross ventilated with minimal mechanical air conditioning. The large roof has 200mm thick 50kg/m3 rockwool and two layers of heat reflective foil in addition to a fully ventilated roof space that houses the rainwater harvesting tanks. The roof also houses an array of photovoltaic panels that generate up to 5 kW peak of electricity, solar hot water panels and wind turbines to ventilate the house interiors. Other green features are the use of low VOC paints, raw material finishes, water saving taps and sanitary wares, low energy light fittings and local native landscaping. The overall aesthetic is one that is clean and minimally raw and natural.

 

© H.Lin Ho

 


 

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Hilltop House in Pasadena, CA by Ladd/Marmol Radziner

Hilltop House in Pasadena, CA by Ladd/Marmol Radziner

Hilltop House in Pasadena, CA by Ladd/Marmol Radziner located in Pasadena, California | The Hardt

 

Hilltop House in Pasadena, CA by Ladd/Marmol Radziner located in Pasadena, California. The Hilltop House and Studio were originally designed by architect Thornton Ladd in 1953. Spread over five acres, the mountaintop retreat is comprised of a 6,700 ft² (622 m²) square foot house and a 1,300 ft² (120 m²)square foot detached studio. The resident of the studio converted the space into a modern guest house. Ladd’s original design integrated indoor and outdoor spaces and took advantage of the dramatic views. The owner’s interest in Japanese architecture and design informed the choice of interior materials – warm woods including cedar and maple for the floors and ceilings, furnished with tatami mats.

 

 

 


 

 

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Aroeira III House (2011) by ColectivArquitectura

Aroeira III House (2011) by ColectivArquitectura

Aroeira III House (2011) by ColectivArquitectura in Portugal | The Hardt

 

Aroeira III House (2011) is a contemporary residence designed by ColectivArquitectura in Portugal, near a golf course (area of Aroeira). Situated in a dense pine forest, the hexagonal plot had no references to the choice of location for the construction. It was conditioned by ‘occupation zone’ defined by the Master Plan – a circle of 12.50 m radius centered a hexagon that defines the perimeter of the plot. To take advantage of the characteristics of the plot, sun exposure, the natural slope of the terrain and the nearby surroundings, we chose to define a volume in which the horizontality prevails and that, although split into two levels, the image of earthen construction does prevail by partially burying the lower floor level, in contrast with the verticality of the existing trees.

 


 

The construction with reinforced structure, and visible concrete on the lower floor, assuming the function of the material and with a structure and coating of Cumarú wood upstairs – with significant advantages in thermal and acoustic comfort -, develops in a U-shape form, defined by three intersecting volumes, forming an open courtyard to the West, limited, to the South, by the swimming pool. The ground level, partially buried, is occupied by a storage compartment in the basement area, a two-car garage, and the entrance hall, both with North facing access, a support room with private toilet and a compartment that serves simultaneously as laundry and a poolside toilet, the swimming pool being located to the east. There is also a small compartment for pool equipment, with access only from the outside.

 

 


 

Upstairs, the non-permanence areas, as the vestibule and part of the circulation areas, face North. The master bedroom, with toilet support, faces South and West, the remaining two bedrooms, also facing South, turn to the patio, the kitchen faces South and East, and the living room faces South and North, taking advantage of the visual threading on the pool and the golf courses of the allotment, as well as on the patio. The intervention in the landscape includes a car access to the North area of the plot and was designed considering the preservation and reinforcement of the existing plant species.

 

Photography by Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

 


 

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https://thehardt.com/architecture/the-beaumont-house-2011-by-henri-cleinge/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/nonhyun-101-1-building-stocker-lee-architetti/

https://thehardt.com/design/minimal/a-house-in-ayukawa-2012-by-mega/

 

 


 

Horatio Street by Steven Harris / Rees Roberts & Partners

Horatio Street by Steven Harris / Rees Roberts & Partners

Horatio Street by Steven Harris / Rees Roberts & Partners in New York, NY | The Hardt

Horatio Street by Steven Harris / Rees Roberts & Partners in New York, NY. The interiors of this 1840s four-story townhouse with rear garden and the sleek glass-walled penthouse was designed for a family based in Rio de Janeiro who has an eclectic art collection and unabashed love of color. The dining room, lined with subtle olive-grey painted shelves for art books and lit by a custom copper disc chandelier, houses a Brazilian antique rosewood table brought to life by padded vintage Jean Prouve chairs recovered in a striking pink fabric. The pale grey-walled living room which looks out over the garden below is highlighted by furnishings in lavender, putty, and black; the fuchsia and patterned accents here were a special request for the family’s daughter. The sleek lines and cool materials of the glass rooftop penthouse complete with fireplace, wet bar, and outdoor terrace were tempered with plush custom bench cushions and pillows; this space provides a magical setting for enjoying views of the High Line, Standard Hotel, and West Village cityscape.

 

 

 


 

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https://thehardt.com/landscape/melbourne-garden-myles-baldwin/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/south-5th-residence-alterstudio-architecture/

 

 


 

The 7 Most Fire Modern To Rustic Houses You’ll See In Marfa, Texas

The 7 Most Fire Modern To Rustic Houses You’ll See In Marfa, Texas

ARCHITECTURE  & INTERIOR DESIGN

The 7 Most Fire Houses In Marfa, Texas

When Donald Judd began his Marfa project in the early 1970s, he would never have predicted the near-mythic status it would end up achieving. The small town of 2,000 residents is 20 miles from the next town and nearly three hours from the nearest major airport, yet it features a contemporary art museum, the Chinati Foundation, and the highly instagrammable Prada Marfa, and attracts artists, celebrities, and urbanites looking for a simpler life—or the latest music festival—all year-round. Besides the austerely beautiful high-desert landscape, this creative enclave is also well known for is its minimalist interiors, architecture, and furniture. Last month, the Monacelli Press published Marfa Modern: Artistic Interiors of the West Texas High Desert, Helen Thompson’s look at 21 homes that illustrate the former water-stops sky, light, and unique sense of isolation. Here, a preview of seven of the homes featured inside.

The Coolest Pool

Trendsetting Austin hotelier Liz Lambert renovated Marfa’s 1950s-era Thunderbird Hotel into a boutique hotel, transformed a large plot of land into El Cosmico, a “nomadic hotel and campground”, and spiffed up an adobe bunkhouse that used to belong to her uncle for herself in the meantime. A water tank is a short jeep ride from the house—it’s her favorite spot for a quick swim and a breathtaking desert view.

“Trendsetting Austin hotelier Liz Lambert renovated Marfa’s 1950s-era Thunderbird Hotel into a boutique hotel.”

Pop Art in the Desert

Houston-based architectural designer Barbara Hill, a red-haired “Miss Texas, 1956”, prefers to remove decorative and architectural elements rather than add them. She spent a year and a half transforming this adobe building, which had been a private dance hall, grocery, and candy store in turn.
The house is located downtown and passersby, curious to see what’s beyond the wall, often peer over the top for a look. Their curiosity is rewarded by a view of a fire pit that anchors the front yard, which was created by Houston and Marfa-based metal artist George Sacaris. Marfa resident and landscape architect Jim Martinez designed the garden.
Hill used birth plywood on both the ceiling and the floor of her home, for visual continuity. White plaster walls add luminous glamour to the rough-and-ready décor. Deep-set windows throughout soften Marfa’s glaring midday light and suggest that the hefty structure is here to stay.
In another 864-square-foot adobe house in Marfa, Hill removed acoustical-tile ceiling in the two front rooms to reveal three additional feet above. Hill installed pink neon light behind the seven-foot-tall Warhol that presides over the dining table and its black and white Bertoia chairs. The bar cart in the kitchen is from Kuhl-Linscomb in Houston.

“Marfa, Texas Has Really Come Into Its Own As A Central Hub For A Flourishing Creative Art Scene.” – Asher Hardt

Earthy Meets Modern

King and Lisa Grossman purchased this century-old adobe building from Barbara Hill; she used it as a weekend retreat but it was once a lawyer’s office and later, a beauty parlor. Two delicate-looking steel rods stretch across both edges of the room’s width—these necessary structural elements are much stronger than they look and give the adobe lateral support. The hay bale coffee table is by The Art Guys, and a pair of Charles and Ray Eames sofas flank the table.
A long French work table, designed by Barbara Hill, now makes an inviting dining table. Blackened steel cabinets are a dramatic counterpoint to the luminous white plaster walls throughout.

2.0 Sliding Doors

“The chairs at the dining table were made as part of a Works Progress Administration project in the 1930s,” says Helen. “The green hand-built chair belonged to Martinez’s great-grandmother.”

The 80-degree angle floor plan of the home is a nod to Jim Martinez’s grandmother whose New Mexico home had the same east-facing floor plan.

“The chairs at the dining table were made as part of a Works Progress Administration project in the 1930s,” says Helen. “The green hand-built chair belonged to Martinez’s great-grandmother.

Color That Pops

When Houston interior designer Marlys Tokerud made the decision to purchase a 1904 adobe house in 1999, she planned to tear down the 550-square-foot pink stucco frame house also on the lot. But Tokerud soon realized she could renovate the little house to live in while she remodeled the main house and soon found oak flooring and a perfectly preserved longleaf pine ceiling that had been the underside of the original roof. A horse trough serves as a tub in the master bath, where vintage blue bottles line a concrete shelf lit by a slit window in the plaster walls.
In the main house, elements such as the 10-foot-high ceilings, 14-inch walls, and painted wood doors were kept intact. Longleaf pine floors were used elsewhere in the house. Not long after Tokerud and her partner, Rick Houser, finished renovating, however, another fire broke out in the kitchen. The repairs offered an opportunity for upgrades, such as plaster walls, discreetly recessed track lighting, and multiple coats of a glossy paint on the ceiling. Houser built a kitchen island out of half a bowling lane imported from El Paso and brought in industrial lighting form his Houston woodworking shop. In the living room, a Christian Liaigre chaise serves as an antidote to the circa 1904 house’s rustic underpinnings. Metal artist George Sacaris built the base for the pine dining table, which was formerly a Mexican door.

Gallery Living

On the site of a former Volkswagen repair shop known as George’s Garage, Vilis Inde, a lawyer turned art collector and gallery owner, and his partner, Tom Jacobs, decided to build a gallery and residence. Pard Morrison’s fired-pigment-on-aluminum sculpture Schneewittchen, 2013, stands tall in a courtyard between the gallery side of the building and the residence. An orange chair by Donald Judd is just visible beyond, in the gallery. A grid pattern inlaid in the interior courtyard defines the space.
This is a house built for living, but also for art. The all-white residence and gallery are designed to help it recede in an unobtrusive way—both from the perspective of the viewer in the street as well as from a visitor stepping inside. Box shapes play a dominant role in the gallery’s design, and squares appear as a recurring motif throughout the bedroom, as with the bookshelves and the chair.

Texture Play

On a lot next to a gas station, on a highway a few blocks West of downtown, Jamey Garza, of Garza Marfa, built a 1200-square-foot cinder-block house covered in gray stucco for a Los Angeles-based couple looking to make a design connection in Marfa. Initially, the couple had wanted a roadhouse but decided on a private getaway after logistics and reality set in. Concrete floors, which were part of the original plan remained and exposed steel trusses and cypress ceilings cover the main room, which includes living, dining, sleeping, and cooking spaces. The casement windows wrap three sides of the room and were painted in a rich orange hue of auto body lacquer. White hard-plaster walls provide a luminous contrast to the velvety gray stucco on the facade. A screened porch on the Westside offers both protection from the sun and a destination for perfect breeze-catching.
This home was painstakingly remodeled over the course of eight years by Austin-based chef Terry Nowell. He added a bathroom and upstairs sleeping loft and modernized the kitchen. Nowell painted the portrait that hangs above the sofa and the red ladder he built that leads to a sleeping loft.
A dried agave plant in a corner of the downstairs bedroom emphasizes the ceiling height (which Nowell raised from seven to ten feet). A “truth window” above the pairs of windows exposes the original adobe brick. Both inside and out, the adobe blocks are covered in cement. Nowell made the white pine bed, woodblock table, the desk, and the floor lamp. He also built the wood side table.
Witten by: LOUISE HART
PHOTOGRAPHS BY:

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