House 304 (2015) by KIENTRUC O

House 304 (2015) by KIENTRUC O

Asher 5:35 am 5:35 am

House 304 (2015) by KIENTRUC O located in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam | The Hardt

 

House 304 (2015) by KIENTRUC O located in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. In this house, we want to provoke an honest living experience for a young family living in a typical urban Vietnamese townhouse. Only 3.5mx12m in size, single façade facing an open street, the design context poses challenges to create a casual, well ventilated and well-lit space within a constrained building footage. Vertical expansion of the light well helps to maximize the desired spatial quality and conditions, while provoking a sense of openness and connectedness to nature as it opens up to the sky. House 304 is a combination of simple spatial functionality, contemporary materials, structure, and construction methodology. Finishes with everyday material, white wall, and timber, the focal point of the house is the interplay between light and nature. Airy, open, and provides uninterrupted view both inside out, and outside in, the residence still possess a sense of private and secure when needed. Thus, the house is a pure representation depicting the life of a young Vietnamese family, that is straightforward, authentic and contented.

 

 

© Hiroyuki Oki

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson

Asher 10:14 pm 10:14 pm

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson, situated in Tokyo, Japan | The Hardt

 

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson, situated in Tokyo, Japan. This design for a compact site in a suburb of Tokyo, the office’s first realized the domestic project in Japan, takes the form of a rectangular box containing living quarters, a room dedicated to the rituals of the traditional tea ceremony and a double-height courtyard open to the sky. The concrete envelope is tinted to reflect the internal division between floors and animated by openings. These apertures frame a series of meticulously edited vistas out of the building that become part of the landscape of the interior. The exaggerated length of the wall leading to the entrance brings quiet theatre to the experience of arrival. Project Team Shingo Ozawa

 

Photography Hisao Suzuki

Marino House by ATV Arquitectos

Marino House by ATV Arquitectos

Asher 9:00 pm 8:43 pm

Immersed in the dense forest of Pinamar, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Marino House by ATV Arquitectos | The Hardt

 

Immersed in the dense forest of Pinamar, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Marino House by ATV Arquitectos.  Respecting its environment and taking advantage of the views, the house tries to preserve and adopt its surroundings. Focusing on the material-structure matters, the project looks into the concrete-wood matching, suggesting concrete as the material which defines the space-tectonic structure of the project. Three supporting partitions, lying linearly with each other, support the slab floors which in turn hang from the superior beams. The structure, with its dimension and texture differences, defines the space and at the same time limits and maximizes the open plant in the public sector. This gives rise to the phenomenon of a space completely ethereal in terms of limits; given that the whole joinery can be opened completely thus building a continuous semi-covered area. The forest is the house’s limit.

On the other hand, wood is the material used to create all the volumes and partitions and it is the element which defines the possible limits which might arise from this environment. These limits are blurred, manipulated. They can be sifted, closed, moved, separated, and so defining relations with the environment. The house functionally sets the access from a patio appendicular to the terrace, which suggests continuity of the street expansions. This patio divides the studio sector and the public space, made up of a living and dining room, kitchen and grill sector. On the first floor, the bedrooms are spatially defined by the location of the wet areas and the wooden partitions. At the same time, this level has access to an observatory deck overlooking the forest.

 

 

The transition from the public to the private space is made through a vertical circulation which takes the subject through different sensations as regards light and visuals. At the same time, a piece totally made of wood goes all over the project, fitting into the concrete structure and relating the different levels with storage places and overhead lightning depending on the conditions. Almost as if it were negative, the project looks into the phenomenical and material relation which arises between the downstairs world (public) and the upstairs world (private). From the concrete textures to the wooden joineries (closing downstairs in the exterior and upstairs in the interior) the project presents this counterpoint, emphasizing the difference between the supported and the supporting, as a tree expressing the elements which shelter the protected space.

 

© Albano García

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina

Asher 6:39 am 6:39 am

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina located in La Romana, Alicante, Spain | The Hardt

 

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina located in La Romana, Alicante, Spain. The local field contains oxides that stain the red landscape. The building has been built with local stone, such as Marble Rojo Alicante, blending in well with the surroundings. The block, marble, and scarlet welcomes you inside, austere but comfortable, and offers a sensorial experience of water and light. The soft light from inside only broke with the light entering through the many cracks in the coating carved marble. There is an attractive interior space, which only communicates with the outside through strategically located grooves that discover you the landscape. The concrete ceiling finished with the texture of the wooden forms, reflects the water sparkle, opens through skylights. In this way, the lighting is overhead, which when mixed with water vapor surrounds you in a nice weightless environment.

Living the Spa Sunsets is a vibrant experience. The light is transformed from a natural light cascading down the skylights with orange warm colors. Entering through the cracks in hundreds of lighting lines that reinforce the red light of the stone, until you can feel gradually the artificial lighting designed to introduce a fun and relaxing environment. The Sunrise reverses the process. All used construction materials are natural (stone, iron, and wood), and they are typical for the area, reinterpreting a vernacular architecture and a lyrical form, where predominates the light treatment to perceive the space. This makes a very modern architecture, fed by the building tradition of the area.

 

 


 

In addition to its innovative design of the facilities, unlike any other Spa, in its facilities, there is a saving energy system that uses the bioclimatic techniques which have made the building a sustainable and economical installation. All lighting system in the SPA is natural.  Artificial lighting is necessary only during the night. Inside we use the perimeter skylights. The natural lighting in all spaces is solved by the glass wall facade, whose light will filter through the lattice. The lattice prevents the sunlight to enter straight into de interior space, then, in warm months, cooling is not required. The spaces have cross ventilation to provide dehumidification and hydrothermal comfort. The energy from the solar panels heats the water in the pool and in the indoor spa. The marble stone is an excellent receptive material that keeps the space warm in winter for many hours, even overnight.
All materials used are local, minimizing transportation costs and manufacturing. Therefore the ecological impact of the building is very small.

© David Frutos

Solis Residence by Renato D’Ettorre Architects

Solis Residence by Renato D’Ettorre Architects

Asher 6:22 am 6:22 am

Solis Residence by Renato D’Ettorre Architects, located on Hamilton Island, Australia | The Hardt

 

Solis Residence by Renato D’Ettorre Architects, located on Hamilton Island, Australia. The residence is sculpted from concrete, stone, block work and glass resulting in a sequence of dramatic volumes incorporating airy living spaces and private sheltered outdoor zones. The building elements are intertwined with reflection ponds and a swimming pool, lending a sense of tranquility. Every level of this house, every turn, and every vantage point provides enormous surprise and delight. Corners of the house float above the terraced landscape, garden terraces and nooks set into the hillside, which features natural stone retaining walls and continuing encounters with water pools and ponds. The house was the recipient of the House of the Year project at the Australian Institute of Architects’ 2011 Central Queensland Regional Architecture Awards.

 

 

 

The house changes its mood on the descent. The upper living areas are light-filled and airy, with little distinction between indoor and outdoor space. In fact, only a small section of this floor can be closed down by screens to provide security, particularly during tropical storms. The lower reaches of the house are more cavernous – cool bedroom chambers, again formed on the ocean views. The palette is concrete and travertine, designed for easy, maintenance-free, cool living in the tropics while acting as a calm counterpoint to complex spatial and sculptural interactions. Terraces are fluid extensions of internal spaces capturing cooling breezes. Swimming pools, reflection ponds and strategically positioned trickling waterfalls soothe both indoors and outdoors. The house is also built to withstand the destructive forces of tropical cyclones. The client had asked for low maintenance materials – so concrete became the primary material.

House JRv2′ by Adam Wysocki of studio De.Materia

House JRv2′ by Adam Wysocki of studio De.Materia

Asher 1:48 pm 6:04 pm

House JRv2′ by Adam Wysocki of studio De.Materia, located in Poznań, Poland | The Hardt

 

House JRv2 by Adam Wysocki of studio De.Materia, located in Poznań, Poland. In order to catch the rising sun in the living room, Adam designed a small patio that overlooks the living room window. The patio wall is at the same time a retaining wall for the slope. While the garage is made entirely of wood (construction and cladding), the bottom part is made of concrete. Concrete walls are made like sandwich – concrete, insulation, concrete. The roof is covered with extensive vegetation of herbs and stonecrops. Facades complement larch wood. The oak lining was used in the interiors.

 

 

 

 

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