Headquarters of the architecture and design studio Sanahuja & Partners

Headquarters of the architecture and design studio Sanahuja & Partners

Located in Calle Denia, Valencia, Headquarters of the architecture and design studio Sanahuja & Partners (2012) | The Hardt

 

Located in Calle Denia, Valencia, Headquarters of the architecture and design studio Sanahuja & Partners (2012)The new headquarters of the Valencian firm seeks to accommodate cultural activities, research and work in the field of architecture, with a desire to open and interrelate with other related disciplines such as interior design, industrial design or landscape, linked to the wide professional structure of the study. The multifunctional space occupying the ground floor and the old warehouse space is called Hat Gallery. This space allows organizing exhibition activities relating to architecture, design, and art in general, while it also can accommodate meetings, lectures, screenings and workshops. It becomes the means of communication and the neighborhood’s outlet for the programmed cultural activities.

 

 

 

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Casa Lola by interior designer Jan Eleni Lemonedes and Ronnie Stam

Casa Lola by interior designer Jan Eleni Lemonedes and Ronnie Stam


Casa Lola by interior designer Jan Eleni Lemonedes and Ronnie Stam located in Porto Seguro, Bahia, Brazil | The Hardt

 

Casa Lola by interior designer Jan Eleni Lemonedes and Ronnie Stam located in Porto Seguro, Bahia, Brazil. Bahia, municipality of Porto Seguro, the town of Trancoso. There is, among other simple constructions, an abode of disconcerting simplicity. The light walls, the white cement, the wood of doors and doorways, the surrounding woods and the fringe flowers on the facade are part of a kind of samba played by a symphony orchestra, a Candeia for four pianos and a violin.

 

All right, Candeia was not from Bahia, but from Rio. And this beautiful Bahia house is not the result of local creativity, but the head of a New Yorker: Jan Eleni Lemonedes, interior designer, which explains the trained look to trace beauties anywhere. Her initial contact with her husband, Ronnie Stam, the creative director, and her daughter, Lola, with Trancoso, took place in 2010 when the family spent ten days in the village and was captured by the beach, food, music and the Square. Soon the searches began for a refuge nearby. 

 

When finding this little house with areas of fisherman’s nook, closed the deal and Jan started the reform project. Of the original construction, only half of the existing area remained, 45 m², where a studio type, a charming cottage works. With an eye on more space, the couple raised, on the same ground, the second residence, with 125 m² and rustic atmosphere similar to the first. Inside the old space, the wooden bench of Trancoso makes a beautiful composition with the round breadboard hanging on the wall – with Brazilian face, the piece came from New York. “We have created an internal patio with a swimming pool that promotes the connection between the two”, says Jan. In every corner of Casa Lola, as the architectural group was baptized, one sees the Dati brand, a local artisan who used eucalyptus for to compose banks, chaises, beds and other pieces that contributed to the RG Bahia of the dwelling. 

 

 


 

The pleasure of taking care of each item, she says, is what gives personality to the setting. “All the decisions, from the choice of the floor to the walls, were well thought out,” he says, indicating how he appropriated space already during the process of building the houses. And making is no way to say, because the inspiration that gave rise to the proposal came from Trancoso’s loom sheets , with that elegant rusticity of hand-made.  While residing in aloft in Manhattan and consider herself a typical new yorker, Jan believes that the seasons in Bahia, which can last for up to two months and happen about three times a year, have made her a more patient person. “New Yorkers have a fast pace. In Trancoso, things are much slower, “he says. 

 

But this only improves the place where, for her, “even the imperfections become perfect in our eyes.” And if the identification with this land is so great, living permanently in the village would be in the plans of the family? Jan says that he sees this possibility on the horizon: “Yes, in an ideal scenario …”. 

 


 

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Trousdale Estates by famed developer Paul Trousdale

Trousdale Estates by famed developer Paul Trousdale

Trousdale Estates by famed developer Paul Trousdale, located in Beverly Hill, Ca. | The Hardt

Trousdale Estates by famed developer Paul Trousdale, located in Beverly Hill, Ca. Trousdale Estates is a 410-acre enclave of large, luxurious homes in Beverly Hills, California. Primarily developed in the 1950s and ’60s, it quickly became famous for its concentration of celebrity residents and the unrestrained extravagance of its midcentury modern architecture. Often working with unlimited budgets, these designers created sprawling, elegant backdrops for the ultimate expression of the American Dream in the mid-to-late twentieth century. In Trousdale, Price explores the architectural backgrounds, details, and floor plans of the amazing homes, giving readers an inside view of the world-famous Beverly Hills style. Lavish new photography is interspersed with archival and historic images, illustrating the glamour of Trousdale both then and now.

 


 

Very few, if any, other places on the planet can claim such a concentration of talent, power, wealth, and, thanks to its rash of drop-dead gorgeous architecture from the mid- to late 20th century, good taste. It’s Old Hollywood glamour at its finest and freshest. Historically snubbed by more grandiose and established corners of Beverly Hills and Bel Air, the leafy realm—originally a sprawling estate owned by members of the Doheny oil dynasty—has more recently earned stable recognition for being an architectural treasure. Trousdale Estates (Regan Arts, $75), a new coffee-table tome by producer and historian Steven M. Price, who chronicles in its pages the area’s famous residents, historical milestones, and society gossip. Not to mention its cache of images revealing the 410-acre neighborhood’s homes designed by luminaries such as Lloyd Wright (son of Frank Lloyd Wright), Wallace Neff, Buff & Hensman, and Cliff May, among many others. As architect Brad Dunning writes in the book’s foreword, “But most of all it’s (cocktail) time to revel in a strange and extraordinary past, place, and era.” 

 

 

This is an absolute must-own coffee table book for any midcentury modern enthusiast, especially if you live in Los Angeles. The price for this book has gotten way ridiculous even though its one of the more well-produced books in my collection so I would recommend waiting until the prices go down due to copies coming to market or it is decided that they will publish the second edition. Regardless, make sure you find a way to own this book, I was fortunate to have been at the right place at the right time and was able to purchase my copy on pre-order.  

 

 


 

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Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin

Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin

Located in Mallorca, Spain Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin | The Hardt

 

Located in Mallorca, Spain Neuendorf House (1991) by John Pawson + Claudio Silvestrin. This vacation house for a German art dealer is set in an almond grove on the island of Mallorca, with views of sea and mountains. The office’s first full architectural project, the design explores ways of achieving a quality of proportion in outside space more usually associated with interiors. The composition of the atrium is emphatically vertical, the exaggerated height of the walls dramatized by the narrowness of the slot opening. As the design brings together certain conventions of interior and exterior spaces, so it plays with the opposition of raw nature and the formality of architecture, pigments from the soil being used to tint the render. The house is currently used as a vacation rental. Check the seasonal rates + a music video shot at the how on the next page, following the photo gallery.

via John Pawson

 

In partnership with Claudio Silvestrin

Project Team
Crispin Osborne

Photography
Richard Bryan

via John Pawson

 

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Tea Room by João Mendes Ribeiro

Tea Room by João Mendes Ribeiro

Tea Room (2000-2002) erected in castle ruin complex, Montemor-o-Velho, João Mendes Ribeiro, located in Paço das Infantas, Portugal | The Hardt

 

Tea Room erected in castle ruin complex, Montemor-o-Velho, João Mendes Ribeiro, Paço das Infantas, Portugal. It is believed that the paço (palace) of Montemor-o-Velho was first built in the 12th century. It is now well established that the paço was the object of a dispute, at the beginning of the 13th century, between Dom Afonso III and his sisters, Infantas Dona Teresa, Dona S, ncha and Dona Mafalda. The current name of the place – Paço das Infantas – originates from this quarrel. Its ruins rise well above the southeast walls of the castle, overlooking the river Mondego’s valley. The proposal for the construction of a Tea House in the surrounding areas of the Paço das Infantas is the result of the analysis of the monument, attempting to clarify its historical significance by means of a contemporary use. By creating a novel pathway along the walls, the former entrance of the castle is evoked. The inner space of the ruins is occupied by a virtually weightless building, made innocuous by its geometry and the way it stands free from the surrounding ruins, which are perceived as its actual walls. The construction consists of a glass box confined by two horizontal planes – a metal roof and a wooden floor – joined together by a volume comprising the service areas. The pavement extends southeast in a platform that doubles as a terrace elevated above ground, thereby detaching the construction from its surroundings. Ultimately, this approach creates an autonomous construction, which is valued by a strong geometric and material language, simultaneously ascribing a new and coherent meaning to the ruins.

 

 


Photos by Edgar Martins, João Mendes Ribeiro

Tea House, Paço das Infantas, Montemor-o-Velho Castle, Portugal
Project year: 1997
Construction year: 1999-2000
Client: Instituto Português do Património Arquitectónico, Montemor-o-Velho City Hall
Location: Montemor-o-Velho Castle, Portugal
Author: João Mendes Ribeiro
Collaboration: Carlos Antunes, Cidália Silva, Desirée Pedro, José António Bandeirinha, Manuela Nogueira, Pedro Grandão

Total area – 90 m2 m2

Cost – 250 000€ €/m2

 


 

 

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TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN

TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN

TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN located in Long Feng Lu, Nanhu Qu, Jiaxing Shi, Zhejiang Sheng, China | The Hardt

 

TKSTYLE Office (2018) by JACKY.W DESIGN located in Long Feng Lu, Nanhu Qu, Jiaxing Shi, Zhejiang Sheng, China. It is commonly considered that people cannot enjoy work and life at the same time, although they are hardly separated from each other completely. Through breaking the routines and bringing a “home” into the workspace, JACKY.W DESIGN created an open and multifunctional living experience space for the fashion brand TKSTYLE BOUTIQUE. At the entrance, several clusters of dry corn stalks are placed by the wall, bringing nature into the space. The large 360-degree revolving door neutralizes the space temperament dominated by cement with its warm wooden texture.

The designers gave full play to the structure and height (8 meters) of the original space and ingeniously integrated functional areas for working, reception, fitness, and conference, etc. into the two-story space without rigid partitions. There are windows in each wall, which ensures sufficient natural lights to penetrate to the space, thereby resulting in a bright and airy environment.  The open layout of the space made it possible for the designers to apply the concept of co-living and cooperative working. Integrating household settings with the workspace in a harmonious way requires quality execution of design and sensibility to details. The design features an industrial style, combined with the exquisite upholstered furniture and adornments, making the overall space rough, simple yet delicate.

 

 


 

The flourishing plants highlight the original beauty of the concrete extensively exposed on the floor, walls, beams, and pillars. The designers tried nine times for the testing and proofing of cast-in-place cement slabs, so as to ensure the stability of the texture. The strict selection and utilization of materials are also manifested in the ultra -white glass and ultra-thin marble slabs with white patterns exported from Spain. With the ingenious application of colors and lines, the designers optimized the spatial texture and experience. If we’re lucky enough to be engaged in an industry that interests us, work will become a joy. This is exactly true for TKSTYLE BOUTIQUE and JACKY.W DESIGN. Perhaps this is the reason that the TKSTYLE Office came into being, which improves work to a new level — “life is work”.

 

 

Second-floor office. Image © Wenyao Photography

 


 

 

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