Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect

Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect

Asher 11:02 am 11:02 am

Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect located in Khet Ratchathewi, Thailand | The Hardt

 

Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect located in Khet Ratchathewi, Thailand.  A major pain point of staying in 690ft² (64 m²) of a duplex condominium unit, which is used for a home-studio for an animator and an artist, is that there is not enough space for the dwelling. Moreover, a double-volume space of living area with a huge glass curtain wall faces west. High temperature occurs all day long since it allows direct sunlight to come inside. In order to solve both mentioned problems, three additional items are proposed which are, GRID PARTITION, EXTENSION DECK, and STEPPING SPACE.

 

 

A glass partition not only dividing space between kitchen and living but also helps reduce electricity charge from air-conditioning. Grid-like of double glass frame is for stuff and stationery hanging, as to serve the owners’ activities. Extension deck would help filtrating heat from direct sunlight, since an existing high glass facade facing West. An existing staircase for going up to the second-floor bedroom is added by a proposed space above since this condominium unit has no enough space for dwelling or storage. In order to utilize the space in a small condominium, creating another staircase above the existing one helps increase the space. The grid partition and the extension deck help ‘decrease’ the electrical charge, while the extension deck and the stepping space help ‘increase’ the space for 120 ft² (11 m²).   

 

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo

 

 

2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda

2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda

Asher 12:08 am 12:08 am

2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda located in Santa Catarina, Mexico | The Hardt

 

2I4E House (2017) by P+0 Architecture + David Pedroza Castañeda located in Santa Catarina, Mexico. A weekend house for a couple was set out in a wooden terrain with descending topography. The best views are located a few meters from the access, in the same place where a dip, that testifies the occasional passing of important quantities of water across the land, is situated. It is right there where we decided to set the house to facilitate the access as well as minimize the presence of the construction in the landscape. The original proposal was a bridge-house where a large volume, suspended over a ravine will connect the two stone garages supported on 3 points: the guest’s room, the staircase, and the grill area. A series of economic blows challenged the bridge project, however, the owner’s strong will to make the house a reality, even if it was just a part, did not give away.

 

A minimum version of the project that can grow over time is then proposed. The bridge volume is left for a second phase and the project includes only the construction of the 2 blocks for the bedrooms. The generous master bedroom becomes the living-dining room; the closet turns into the kitchen and the guest´s room becomes the new master bedroom. To achieve a congruent built volume these 2 interiors (2I) are proposed as simple and independent elements placed one on top of the other. The connections between them and the relationship with the surroundings generate 4 outdoor spaces (4E) to enjoy the landscape. 

 

The lower volume consists of a bedroom facing the forest, with a bathroom in the background. It is a semi-underground volume whose apparent concrete walls generate the garage on the upper floor. On these walls, a staircase is suspended from the garage giving access to the bedroom. The entrance is through the first of the exterior spaces: a patio crowned with a tree, limited by a series of walls that allow it to be treated as a small plaza. The upper volume contains a small living and dining room, a kitchen open towards the social spaces and a full bathroom that will allow the volume to function as a bedroom in the future. The block moves to the west to generate an access and remains suspended over the bedroom creating, on the lower floor, a second outdoor space: a covered terrace protected by the shade of the magnificent pine tree and cedars surrounding. 

 

 

The roof of the bedroom, which leads to the north towards the forest, generates a third open space: a small solarium which is accessed through the huge window that demarcates the room. To the south, a second staircase to access the rooftop is suspended from the house social volume. This fourth outer space allows enjoying the most impressive views of the land. The house resolves almost all the interior surfaces with natural concrete. The structural elements such as banked beams, retaining walls and stairs were left apparent; the polystyrene beam and vault roof, as well as the insulating panel loading walls, are flattened with a fine, polished finish. The floors were made also in concrete generating a neutral and clean aesthetic that underlines the beauty of the landscape.

 

The exterior spaces attached to the ground, such as the garage and the terraces of the bedroom, are resolved in local stone in a rustic finish. The solariums on top of the bedroom and rooftop use a polished concrete finish. The sober and pure materiality cleanses indoors and outdoors underlining the beauty of the landscape and converting it into the theme of the spaces. Nature activates the project, not only by framing it and creating contrast but by making the neutral volumes the surface where the shadows of a large number of trees encircling the house project, adding life to these small pieces that converse with the surroundings with small contemplation points. The relation between interiors and exteriors establishes a new dialog with the woods and the mountains.

 

© FCH Fotografía  

Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects

Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects

Asher 10:26 am 10:26 am

Located in Torquay, Victoria, Australia, Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects | The Hardt

Located in Torquay, Victoria, Australia, Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects. This project attempts to challenge our traditional notions of how buildings can exist both in a coastal environment and in this case also the context of an emerging built form and character. In coastal conditions, buildings must be robust and defy the elements, yet create protective spaces, both internal and external which for us allow the occupants to feel safe, comfortable, privacy and enjoyment of good times. Whether the occupants are fulltime residents or weekenders, the beach house is a place to look forward to arriving, whether in the heat of the summer or the winter’s cold. With excellent views to the north and south and a conscious motivation to avoid the east/west outlooks, this project evolved as a series of interconnected and robustly finished containers. Each prescribed to a rigid set of rules and the relationship and spaces between containers becoming essential to the program and to the life of the building. The robust mass of the buildings is intended to be offset by the expression of finely considered detail and proportion. It is the private spaces created in between that allow natural ventilation and light, intimate outlooks, and privacy for the occupants, a place to call home.

 

 

© Derek Swalwell

 


 

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Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão

Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão

Asher 8:14 am 8:22 am

Located in Avaré, Brazil, Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão | The Hardt

 

Located in Avaré, Brazil, Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão. The Ownerless House nº 01 is the first of three contiguous lands bought by the client with the intent of building investment houses in Avaré, a city in the interior of São Paulo. The single-family housing projects usually turn to desires and particularities of the clients but in this case, the client being only an intermediary to the future resident, the program and space should be flexible enough to accommodate the most diverse families dynamics. Get at the link in bio to check the rest of the project. The entire project was designed not as an object but as a route back to the interior with alternating open and closed spaces where natural light and reflections change according to the time and the season. Viewed externally, the house presents itself as a sculpted recess into the built mass, where the leaning red wall directs the perspective to the beginning of the journey.

 

 


 

The living, dining and kitchen areas are spread out over a courtyard located in the center of the plan which, surrounded by large panels of glass, dilutes the limits by integrating them visually. Both the patio and its extension, a lowered floor of hydraulic tiles, are covered by a continuous pergola. These pergola elements were prefabricated individually on the bed and later assembled in order to facilitate assembly and save on shapes and struts. This technique was rescued from studies of the work of the Brazilian architect Rino Levi, where the architect uses the prefabricated elements of concrete in residences in the capital to create light entrances in the middle of the slab.

 

© Pedro Kok

 


 

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Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects

Asher 7:48 pm 7:48 pm

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia | The Hardt

 

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia. The clients for this project approached us around Easter in 2011. They are a young family from the city who had purchased this terrific sloping allotment just five minutes’ walk from back beach along Bass Strait. The landform was dominated by an awkward contour and it was clear that the site was halfway up a dune. The block to the west was the top of the dune and the vacant block to the east was the bottom. There was native vegetation, but it was sporadic and insignificant. We were briefed to provide a family home that would give plenty of outdoor space and play area for the kids and their friends, but most importantly the brief insisted that the feel of the house be quite divorced from reminders of life in the city. We studied the landform and we studied the planning requirements. We then prepared a building envelope, placing the dwelling as far to the rear (south) of the lot as possible, providing a terrific expanse of open space to the north. By the time we pushed the form back, it was significantly elevated.

 

As the founding materials are sand, we undertook a major rethink of the landform and the site’s contours by excavating under the dwelling area to create a large undercroft and lower ground floor rumpus area and used that fill to create a north facing quadrangle at the upper level. The result is an apparent single story, low slung dwelling on arrival. A further challenge contemplated the public aspect. The road is located north of the site, therefore a driveway for car parking and arrivals needed to consider how we might plan to make this open space private. We employed a permeable but physical barrier dissecting the public and private aspects of the dwelling. The form of the barrier, a series of free-standing steel sheets with 100mm gaps exists as a sculptural element in the landscape, evoking images of the found object. Access to the dwelling is external, via a garden path defined by a further device, a line of pillars constructed from rammed earth also emerging as objects in the landscape, seemingly molded by the conditions over time. This element clearly defines the public and private realms, yet provides crossovers and transitional spaces in the form of a sandpit, an outdoor shower area, and landscape planting zones. The dwelling itself is conceived over four main modules. Two main living zones separated by a services zone which is located directly over the rumpus room below. The fourth module is the semi roofed external living area, linking the dwelling interior with the landscape. The clients embraced a robust approach to the design of the dwelling. The plan form is rectilinear, with hallways wide enough for kids to ride their bikes. A second linking bbq deck completes the circuit. The materials are generally recycled timbers, with blackened plywood walls, a black ceiling which encourages the enjoyment of light and the externally framed views of the landscape. The bathrooms are glossy heat treated mild steel which reflects the color of the mosaic tiled floors and the shafts of light from the skylights. At night, the sheets imbue a warmth in the reflection of incandescent light.

 

 


 

One of the owners grew up in Eltham, a rural bushland retreat east of the city in a house designed by Alistair Knox. The imagery portrayed by the client of a childhood memory growing up in a Knox dwelling had a significant impact on the project. We considered the use of breeze block and concrete block to provide reminders and links back to notions of the surf clubhouse. Through the development of the design, these elements became more refined with the use of rammed earth and the implementation of laser cut screens employing one of the common motifs of the breeze block.

 

 

© Derek Swalwell

 


 

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Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect

Asher 9:53 pm 9:53 pm

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States | The Hardt

 

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States. The Key Biscayne Residence developed in response to its sub-tropical island environment. Pools are the principle, and ever-present, organizing elements of the series of living spaces, providing a feeling of coolness in the bright Miami light. Moving through the house, the experiences shift from being outdoors in a vertical space that is enveloped with walls of clay louvers, to entering a horizontally organized living area surrounded by glass doors that can entirely open to breezeways and pools.

 

 


 

The Key Biscayne Residence is depictive of the Latin cultural environment that surrounds it, including the client for whom it was designed. The South Florida community has many Latin American residents and the intent was to design a contemporary, comfortable house within a condition inclusive of many Mediterranean-style homes that are embedded in these cultural conditions. As a result, many architectural elements are utilized that are inherent to the Latin tradition including patios, Portales (porches), and persianas (louvered screens). The use of materials and overall layout present a series of spatial experiences defined by light and shadow and permeable connections between interior and exterior. Implicitly interpreting the persianas, which filter light as well as mitigate heat, terracotta brick louver systems were selected in three types: a more traditional and regular horizontal pattern, pivoting vertical panels, and textural, more solid bricks.

 

The house itself is a series of interlocking and overlapping volumes with voids, allowing for spatial complexity and spaces that snake through the house. Because the floor level is elevated to be free from flooding, one must ascend to enter. The reflecting pools at the entry and visible pool at the rear of the house contribute to the sensory, floating quality of this private home.

 

© Michael Stavaridis

 


 

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