The Hardt john pawson baron house Baron House located in Skåne, Sweden by John Pawson Architecture Classic Concrete conversion Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Lifestyle Minimal Modern Nature Photography restoration View  sweden Skåne John Pawson Fabian Baron 2005   Image of john pawson baron house

Baron House located in Skåne, Sweden by John Pawson

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Baron House located in Skåne, Sweden by John Pawson | The Hardt

 

Baron House located in Skåne, Sweden by John Pawson. The site of this vacation house in rural southern Sweden came with a conventional arrangement of farm buildings set around a courtyard and the earliest phases of the project explored the possibility of retaining some elements of the original structures. The final design raises single-story wings of accommodation on the cleared footprint of the old. Agricultural precedents are reworked in both the form and materiality of the architecture, producing pitched roofs of corrugated zinc, white rendered walls and timber elements. 

 

 

 

 

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The Hardt StudioSC 2011 by Marcio Kogan located in Sao Paulo Brazil 123 Baron House located in Skåne, Sweden by John Pawson Architecture Classic Concrete conversion Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Lifestyle Minimal Modern Nature Photography restoration View  sweden Skåne John Pawson Fabian Baron 2005   Image of StudioSC 2011 by Marcio Kogan located in Sao Paulo Brazil 123

StudioSC (2011) by Marcio Kogan

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StudioSC (2011) by Marcio Kogan located in Sao Paulo, Brazil | The Hardt

 

StudioSC (2011) by Marcio Kogan located in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The architectural project of this photography studio, specialized in food photos, emerged from an internal competition held at StudioMK27. The team was divided into 3 groups that worked on the development of different ideas for one day. From these first rough sketches a new project, which, in part, was a synthesis of all these sketches and, in part, an entirely new project, was elaborated. In the definitive design, the land was longitudinally divided into two. The Northern part, with a width of 7.2m and a length of 43.5m, was reserved for a generous garden. This space functions as an internal esplanade for the building. The Southern part, with a width of 12.2m and a length of 43.5m, in turn, was totally built and contains the program of the studio.

The entrance is via the garden: large sliding metal doors open in their entirety and create a total continuity between the central emptiness and the external space. The main space of the studio is cut by a concrete walkway suspended from the ceiling. This element connects two wooden boxes and configures an internal overlook. On the ground floor, the first wooden volume, closer to the parking lot, is the reception area and a room for image treatment and, on the first-floor work-room lit by an internal patio. The second volume, on the ground floor, houses storerooms and a technical kitchen, which prepares the food for the photos and, on the first floor, an image treatment room.

 

 

 

On the top floor, in addition to a wooden deck, there is a social area for receptions. It is a large open kitchen from which chefs can prepare complete meals which are served right on the counter-top. One of the initial principles of the architecture for the building was to create a complete trajectory, going through the walkway and the main spaces of the studio before the visitor arrives at the upper kitchen. In this way, he is familiar with the workplaces, even if the studio is not working. 

For this project, StudioMK27 sought to use industrial materials and installations. All the external finishings are of metal and, in the internal space, there is a blend of metal and wood, which warms and affects the environment. This studio is also a commentary about the historic relationship between Brazilian and Japanese architecture, two productions that, until today, maintain a national identity. The principal contemporary Japanese architects are inspired not only by the modern architecture of Japan but also by the modern architecture of Brazil. The StudioSC project incorporates the main lessons of this Brazilian architecture produced from the 30´s to the 60´s, as well as some lessons from contemporary Japanese architecture which, in turn, was influenced by the Brazilian production.

 

 

 

 © Nelson Kon  
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Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson

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Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson, situated in Tokyo, Japan | The Hardt

 

Tetsuka House (2003-2005) by John Pawson, situated in Tokyo, Japan. This design for a compact site in a suburb of Tokyo, the office’s first realized the domestic project in Japan, takes the form of a rectangular box containing living quarters, a room dedicated to the rituals of the traditional tea ceremony and a double-height courtyard open to the sky. The concrete envelope is tinted to reflect the internal division between floors and animated by openings. These apertures frame a series of meticulously edited vistas out of the building that become part of the landscape of the interior. The exaggerated length of the wall leading to the entrance brings quiet theatre to the experience of arrival. Project Team Shingo Ozawa

 

Photography Hisao Suzuki

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Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects

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Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia | The Hardt

 

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia. The clients for this project approached us around Easter in 2011. They are a young family from the city who had purchased this terrific sloping allotment just five minutes’ walk from back beach along Bass Strait. The landform was dominated by an awkward contour and it was clear that the site was halfway up a dune. The block to the west was the top of the dune and the vacant block to the east was the bottom. There was native vegetation, but it was sporadic and insignificant. We were briefed to provide a family home that would give plenty of outdoor space and play area for the kids and their friends, but most importantly the brief insisted that the feel of the house be quite divorced from reminders of life in the city. We studied the landform and we studied the planning requirements. We then prepared a building envelope, placing the dwelling as far to the rear (south) of the lot as possible, providing a terrific expanse of open space to the north. By the time we pushed the form back, it was significantly elevated.

 

As the founding materials are sand, we undertook a major rethink of the landform and the site’s contours by excavating under the dwelling area to create a large undercroft and lower ground floor rumpus area and used that fill to create a north facing quadrangle at the upper level. The result is an apparent single story, low slung dwelling on arrival. A further challenge contemplated the public aspect. The road is located north of the site, therefore a driveway for car parking and arrivals needed to consider how we might plan to make this open space private. We employed a permeable but physical barrier dissecting the public and private aspects of the dwelling. The form of the barrier, a series of free-standing steel sheets with 100mm gaps exists as a sculptural element in the landscape, evoking images of the found object. Access to the dwelling is external, via a garden path defined by a further device, a line of pillars constructed from rammed earth also emerging as objects in the landscape, seemingly molded by the conditions over time. This element clearly defines the public and private realms, yet provides crossovers and transitional spaces in the form of a sandpit, an outdoor shower area, and landscape planting zones. The dwelling itself is conceived over four main modules. Two main living zones separated by a services zone which is located directly over the rumpus room below. The fourth module is the semi roofed external living area, linking the dwelling interior with the landscape. The clients embraced a robust approach to the design of the dwelling. The plan form is rectilinear, with hallways wide enough for kids to ride their bikes. A second linking bbq deck completes the circuit. The materials are generally recycled timbers, with blackened plywood walls, a black ceiling which encourages the enjoyment of light and the externally framed views of the landscape. The bathrooms are glossy heat treated mild steel which reflects the color of the mosaic tiled floors and the shafts of light from the skylights. At night, the sheets imbue a warmth in the reflection of incandescent light.

 

 


 

One of the owners grew up in Eltham, a rural bushland retreat east of the city in a house designed by Alistair Knox. The imagery portrayed by the client of a childhood memory growing up in a Knox dwelling had a significant impact on the project. We considered the use of breeze block and concrete block to provide reminders and links back to notions of the surf clubhouse. Through the development of the design, these elements became more refined with the use of rammed earth and the implementation of laser cut screens employing one of the common motifs of the breeze block.

 

 

© Derek Swalwell

 


 

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The Hardt Gallaratese 4 DEREK SWALWELL 1080x675 Baron House located in Skåne, Sweden by John Pawson Architecture Classic Concrete conversion Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Lifestyle Minimal Modern Nature Photography restoration View  sweden Skåne John Pawson Fabian Baron 2005   Image of Gallaratese 4 DEREK SWALWELL 1080x675

Outdistance by Derek Swalwell

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Outdistance, the first solo show by my friend and prominent architecture photographer, Derek Swalwell. Shot entirely in Italy | The Hardt

 

Outdistance, the first solo show by my friend and prominent architecture photographer, Derek Swalwell. Shot entirely in Italy, Swalwell takes an intimate look at the works of famed architects Carlo Scarpa, Aldo Rossi and Carlo Aymonino to uncover a new narrative around these historically significant locations.

Through his curious lens and precise composition, Outdistance pays an extraordinary tribute to these design greats, focusing in on the details whilst capturing the magnetic dance between architecture and light.

Derek’s work has featured in a magnitude of design and architecture books and magazines across the world, including Architectural Digest (USA), Architectural Digest (MEX), Vogue Living, Architectural Review, Architecture Australia, Elle Decor to name a few.

 

 


 

Architecture has always been a fascination for me, and I think one of the contributing factors was my time traveling and seeing architectural innovation from across the world. I became interested in how the light worked through buildings. The way that the design of a building contributes to it’s changing throughout the day upon their trajectory of the sun.” 

– Derek Swalwell

 

 

Learn more about Derek Swalwell and his latest work here

 


 

 

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The Hardt trousdale estates 9781941393376.in01 1080x675 Baron House located in Skåne, Sweden by John Pawson Architecture Classic Concrete conversion Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Lifestyle Minimal Modern Nature Photography restoration View  sweden Skåne John Pawson Fabian Baron 2005   Image of trousdale estates 9781941393376.in01 1080x675

Trousdale Estates by famed developer Paul Trousdale

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Trousdale Estates by famed developer Paul Trousdale, located in Beverly Hill, Ca. | The Hardt

Trousdale Estates by famed developer Paul Trousdale, located in Beverly Hill, Ca. Trousdale Estates is a 410-acre enclave of large, luxurious homes in Beverly Hills, California. Primarily developed in the 1950s and ’60s, it quickly became famous for its concentration of celebrity residents and the unrestrained extravagance of its midcentury modern architecture. Often working with unlimited budgets, these designers created sprawling, elegant backdrops for the ultimate expression of the American Dream in the mid-to-late twentieth century. In Trousdale, Price explores the architectural backgrounds, details, and floor plans of the amazing homes, giving readers an inside view of the world-famous Beverly Hills style. Lavish new photography is interspersed with archival and historic images, illustrating the glamour of Trousdale both then and now.

 


 

Very few, if any, other places on the planet can claim such a concentration of talent, power, wealth, and, thanks to its rash of drop-dead gorgeous architecture from the mid- to late 20th century, good taste. It’s Old Hollywood glamour at its finest and freshest. Historically snubbed by more grandiose and established corners of Beverly Hills and Bel Air, the leafy realm—originally a sprawling estate owned by members of the Doheny oil dynasty—has more recently earned stable recognition for being an architectural treasure. Trousdale Estates (Regan Arts, $75), a new coffee-table tome by producer and historian Steven M. Price, who chronicles in its pages the area’s famous residents, historical milestones, and society gossip. Not to mention its cache of images revealing the 410-acre neighborhood’s homes designed by luminaries such as Lloyd Wright (son of Frank Lloyd Wright), Wallace Neff, Buff & Hensman, and Cliff May, among many others. As architect Brad Dunning writes in the book’s foreword, “But most of all it’s (cocktail) time to revel in a strange and extraordinary past, place, and era.” 

 

 

This is an absolute must-own coffee table book for any midcentury modern enthusiast, especially if you live in Los Angeles. The price for this book has gotten way ridiculous even though its one of the more well-produced books in my collection so I would recommend waiting until the prices go down due to copies coming to market or it is decided that they will publish the second edition. Regardless, make sure you find a way to own this book, I was fortunate to have been at the right place at the right time and was able to purchase my copy on pre-order.  

 

 


 

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