The Hardt Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Ferna%CC%81ndez 0 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Ferna%CC%81ndez 0 1080x675

Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico

Asher 8:34 pm 7:51 am

Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico

 

Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico. Mexican artist Pedro Reyes and his wife, fashion designer Carla Fernández designed a gorgeous house that is an exceptional example of Brutalist Beauty. The couple built their beautiful Home in Coyoacán, south of Mexico City, it is a peculiar structure that was envisioned as a dwelling for the caveman of the future. The source of inspiration for the concept are the ruins of a civilization, now extinct, which was more advanced than the one we’re living in now, according to the designers. Hammered concrete walls, chunky furniture from volcanic stone and an abundance of rich, overblown greenery all come together to form an architectural masterpiece. Part of the remarkable stone floor is inspired by the nearby Anahuacalli Museum, the “temple” designed by Rivera in 1957 as a depository for his collection of 60,000 pre-Hispanic artifacts. Elsewhere, hammered concrete floors and walls were inspired by the Mexican brutalists, in particular, 89-year-old Teodoro González de León, who built many landmarks across the Mexican capital.

 

 

Ancient Aztecs meet The Martian Chronicles in the form of hammered concrete walls, chunky furniture hewn from volcanic stone and an abundance of rich, overblown greenery. A “pyramid” at one end is Carla’s studio, a yard behind it will be Pedro’s. It’s currently a ramshackle plot occupied by the team of artisans that is helping finish the house. “The use of concrete is very canonical, very clichéd, but it has many possibilities,” says Reyes, pointing out the handmade bricks covered with a wax-like concrete paste, which he, and his team, developed specifically for this project.

 

 

The couple also designed much of the furniture, a series of chunky unusual constructs that are deemed artworks in their own right, while at the same time serving a functional purpose. The lava-stone master bath and basin and the concrete kitchen table are two of the most imposing pieces, but perhaps the centerpiece of the house is a ceiling light, made of copper tubes threaded through an electrical wire. The striking ceiling light is inspired by the work of Buckminster Fuller, as is a 4m-high geodesic dome being completed in the living room. Another distinctive piece of furniture is Reyes’ sign language-inspired “Mano-Sillas” chairs, that appear alongside international and Mexican midcentury classics from the likes of Charles and Ray Eames and Clara Porset, and simple rural pieces such as milking stools, leather butaque chairs and seats woven from palm fronds. “The technique was used by the Aztecs and has been recovered by the design-conscious, but not in any official way,” says Reyes. “It would be great to make them on a large scale in other raw materials”. Revisiting ancient indigenous skills and developing a modern Mexican language lies at the heart of Fernández’s work, in particular.

 

 

 

Between the master bedroom and the two children’s bedrooms, there is space for one of “the best hammocks in Mexico”. These are woven by women from cooperatives in Izamal in Yucatán and Calkiní in Campeche, take two months to make and can sleep a family of four. The multitude of cultural symbolism is no coincidence. Before becoming an artist, Reyes trained as an architect at the Ibero-American University in Mexico City. His plan in designing the house was to transform 1.000 square meters of a “1980s monstrosity” into a modern space that includes hints of all of Mexico’s many modern cultural aspects. Enjoy the best parts of this Brutalist Beauty in the gallery below.

 

Words via DesignIsThis

Photos by Edmund Sumner

 

 

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The Hardt 31 Carysfort Road House by ODOS Architects situated in Dalkey Ireland 5 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of 31 Carysfort Road House by ODOS Architects situated in Dalkey Ireland 5

31 Carysfort Road House by ODOS Architects situated in Dalkey, Ireland

Asher 5:52 am 5:52 am

31 Carysfort Road House by ODOS Architects situated in Dalkey, Ireland | The Hardt

 

31 Carysfort Road House by ODOS Architects situated in Dalkey, Ireland. Originally No. 31 Carysfort Road was a mid-terrace, one bedroom dwelling, with a single story rear return and small back garden. Our brief was to refurbish the existing dwelling and improve the connection between living areas and the limited external space while providing as much extra floor space as possible. The tight site conditions along with the strict planning constraints quickly defined the parameters within which we could work, but also began to suggest the basic form and shape of the new rear extension. This new structure was conceived as a simple form which connected at ground floor level with the rear of the main house. Its ground floor rear elevation is completely open to provide a full height glazed connection to the rear courtyard while a similar opening is provided at a high level to allow south light to penetrate deep into the building plan over the adjoining roofscape. In front of this high-level clerestory, a small office or study area has been provided on the mezzanine, looking down into the new living area below.

 

 

 

In order to ensure the new structure to the rear would not be visible over the ridge lines of adjoining structures, the rear extension has been partially sunk into the ground resulting in a complexity of form and volume both internally & externally. Externally this new structure is formed by a fair-faced concrete shell and a negative joint or external ‘shadow gap’ has been provided around its sides and base, helping it to hover over the rear courtyard and assert its own unique status within the surrounding context. A single door provides access to the rear courtyard which has been given a glazed external finish, sitting flush with the adjoining fixed, frameless glazing section. Internally, a black terrazzo floor has been used throughout, set against white walls, ceilings and recessed, flush finishing units. The front bathroom walls are clad entirely with full height honed basalt stone slabs. The rear courtyard has been finished with simple white gravel and contains a fair-faced concrete deck/dog kennel and a mature olive tree.

 

Photos courtesy: Barbara Corsico

 

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The Hardt Casa Ladrillo in Rosario Mauerwerk WohnenEFH 11 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Casa Ladrillo in Rosario Mauerwerk WohnenEFH 11 1080x675

Casa Ladrillo in Rosario by Diego Arraigada Arquitectos, Rosario, Argentina

Asher 10:52 am 10:52 am

Casa Ladrillo in Rosario by Diego Arraigada Arquitectos, Rosario, Argentina | The Hardt

 

Casa Ladrillo in Rosario by Diego Arraigada Arquitectos, located in Argentina. Ladrillo refers to the brick in Spanish – so the Casa Ladrillo is a brick or brick house. In Argentina’s third largest city, Rosario, this material is mandatory for the exterior walls of each new building and the local building code even specifies its thickness of at least 30 centimeters. The local architect Diego Arraigada is therefore well-versed in dealing with masonry and has designed a cube-shaped dwelling-house for a family of four, in which apart from the load-bearing outer and inner walls, the shell also has a perforated bandage as a filter and sun protection brick is built. On the 310 square meter property, he realized a three-story detached house with approximately 240 square meters of floor space. The supporting structure consists of three masonry walls that run perpendicular to the street and the street facade itself. Large openings with floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors and loggias face the garden to the north. The subtly masonry exterior walls with perforations and diamond-shaped openings, on the one hand, protect against insights and sunlight, but on the other hand, allow views into and sufficient daylight into the interior.

 

 

Enter the house on the southeast side through a triangular opening in the masonry. The ground floor accommodates the kitchen and the living-dining area with terrace to the garden as well as a guest WC. A staircase along the closed street facade leads to the first floor, where there are three equally sized bedrooms and two bathrooms. On the second floor are a large studio and the laundry room and a roof terrace. All masonry walls are unpainted and the concrete floors, floors, and staircases remained untreated. Masonry the best ratio of load capacity to opening percentage and transparency arises. Using a digital structural model and algorithm, the architects applied the perforation patterns to the structure and placed the openings. The mild climate in Rosario makes it possible to construct a single-shell external wall of brick without a thermal barrier coating. Investigations in advance showed that in the outer walls by the Kreuzverband.

 

 

The exterior walls are made of locally produced bricks and consist of three layers. The outer two layers are built according to the rules of the masonry building in the Cross Association, the inner layer is executed as usual in an exposed masonry as a masonry. The semi-open north facade in front of the loggias is only two stone layers deep, here accounted for the inner shell. At the larger diamond-shaped openings, the load transfer takes place diagonally; here the masonry was additionally reinforced. By uniform cross-shaped perforations reaches the north facade, the maximum allowable opening rate of about 35 percent, while in the other facades, the openings are partly continued as a pure relief in the outermost layer of masonry.

 

Photos by Gustavo Frittegotto

 

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The Hardt Fonte Boa House by Joa%CC%83o Mendes Ribeiro located in Fonte Boa Portugal 512 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Fonte Boa House by Joa%CC%83o Mendes Ribeiro located in Fonte Boa Portugal 512 1080x675

Fonte Boa House by João Mendes Ribeiro located in Fonte Boa, Portugal

Asher 2:17 pm 2:17 pm

Fonte Boa House by João Mendes Ribeiro located in Fonte Boa, Portugal | The Hardt

 

Fonte Boa House by João Mendes Ribeiro located in Fonte Boa, Portugal. The Fonte Boa House is a single family house designed in a rural estate in Fartosa, Fonte Boa, in the center of Portugal. The small estate, with a vineyard and olive grove, is located in the Rabaçal valley, confined by the Jerumelo, Sicó, and Espinhal mountains. This expressive valley’s landscape, which was once occupied by a Roman villa (around IV BC), is now mainly characterized by small plants and big olive trees. The house is located in the west side of the estate, protected from the main road, taking advantage of the best sun exposure, the surrounding trees and the views over the valley. The accurate position of the house was set so that there wouldn’t be major changes in the terrain, maintaining the existing slope and preserving all the existing trees.

 

 

Reinterpreting the traditional single-family housing typology, the house is a two-story rectangular volume with zinc pitched roof, whose volume detaches itself from the slope with a concrete basement (occupied by a small wine cellar). From the street, the entrance is made through an opening in the stone wall that limits the south part of the site. The open garage, built below the terrain level, is enclosed by concrete walls, by the semi-underground concrete box that hosts the laundry room, and by the stairs that lead to the upper level where the house is located. A succession of platforms leads to the entrance of the house, which is protected by a windbreak door. Inside, both floors are organized in three parts, with core stairs and utility area that, on the ground floor, divides the dining from the living room and, on the first floor, separates the two main bedrooms.

 

 © José Campos  

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

The Hardt Copper House II by Studio Mumbai Situated in Chondi Maharashtra India 1 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of Copper House II by Studio Mumbai Situated in Chondi Maharashtra India 1 1080x675

Copper House II by Studio Mumbai situated in Chondi, Maharashtra, India

Asher 12:38 pm 4:01 pm

Copper House II by Studio Mumbai situated in Chondi, Maharashtra, India | The Hardt

 

Studio Mumbai / Copper House II from Daniele Marucci on Vimeo.

 

Copper House II by Studio Mumbai situated in Chondi, Maharashtra, India.  The Hortus conclusus unites within itself a marvelous assemblage of disparate aspects. It seeks to understand the landscape it denies, explain the world it excludes, bring in the nature it fears and summarise all this in an architectural composition. The Enclosed Garden, Rob Aben, Saskia de Wit. The severe flood of Mumbai and its hinterland in 2005 had marked its high-water mark on a pump-house that was extant to the site. After using it to register the datum for the house, pile foundations were put in and a slab was cast two feet above the high-water line. The central fill came from the excavation for the well, and around a court, the house grew. The language and logic of the building are located in three primary architectural moves. The first is the creation of two distinct blocks, varying in width by a foot, separated by the stone-paved courtyard on the ground, and united by the cupric roof plane at the upper level. The two blocks function as discrete personal spaces on the upper level, one is a singular space of bedroom and bath, the other has an additional study.

 

 

At the ground level, an indoor family room becomes an adjunct to the main living space which does not have the containment that the other more private spaces exhibit. This main space functions literally as the deck of the house, overlooking the landscape and the courtyard, creating a simultaneity of vistas, each of a different scale and access. The copper-covered private spaces at the upper level are positioned in mutual tension, with the guarantee of simultaneous intimacy and isolation, so essential to the domestic interior. This spatial strategy also allows for varying levels of communication, visual and otherwise, between the upper and lower spaces of the house. In Kerala, further south from Mumbai along the west coast of the Indian peninsula (as in many other regions), the courtyard was the center of the traditional house.

 


 

The central room formed by the courtyard flanked by pillars was called the naalukettu. But the entire structure, comprising the central hall and the four wings around was also commonly referred to as the naalukettu. This reference to the courtyard as the house itself, holds a clue to the development of the design for this house, as it evolved from being an embracing structure to one which opened out. The second definitive move is the layering of light through a series of material gestures, each one tuned to the direction that light takes and the need for changing degrees of privacy. This is articulated with screening devices made of fine netting framed in traditionally crafted wood, fluted glass which diffuses the light and greenery and hints at the absent city, and sliding and folding wooden windows, all of which allow for degrees of seclusion.

 

 

The walls are finished in a celadon-colored traditional plaster, smooth like human skin, and crackled like the ancient Chinese glaze, giving the transitory appearance of a fragmented ceramic container, rectilinear and encased with a lid of weathered copper. The continuous copper roof plane forms a secondary datum for the house, becoming a surface of potential occupation and cover. The last is the inclusion of the element of water, whether in the form of the monsoon rain which is relentless in its action on material and mood, or in the form of the well, the stream and the pool beyond the house. The seasonal ‘anxiety’ of the ground is addressed in the manner in which the paving is worked out within the courtyard in a continuous linear fashion and in a loose ring around the house, with undulations registering the flow of rainwater as it reaches for the nearest point of exit. The entrance portal of the building is a non-place. Sitting beneath the first upper copper-wrapped container, it becomes a space of pause. In this house, with its Hortus conclusus acting both as container and sieve, the exploration of the rites of retreat, passage and exclusion are tested again. The final gesture was housing the massive rock which came as a gift from the owner’s mother, leaving it for time to take over, as time inevitably will.

 

Photos Courtesy of Studio Mumbai

The video shot by Daniele Marucci shows the relationship between architecture and the environment, the nature that surrounds it, the context in which it is located and how it reacts to different weather conditions.
It was filmed in India in July 2012 with a Canon 5D Mark II, and was part of the exhibition of the BSI Swiss Architectural Award 2012, which opened in September at the Academy of Architecture in Mendrisio (Switzerland).

 

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The Hardt House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch Switzerland 1080x675 Mexico City House by Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández located in Mexico City, Mexico Architecture Art Books Concrete Courtyard Decor Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern patterns stone  Pedro Reyes and Carla Fernández Pedro Reyes Mexico City mexico Edmund Sumner Coyoacán Carla Fernández   Image of House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch Switzerland 1080x675

House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch, Switzerland

Asher 7:33 am 7:33 am

House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch, Switzerland | The Hardt

 

House Presenhuber by AFGH located in Ramosch, Switzerland. This holiday house is located in the middle of the village of Vnà in the Lower Engadine. The particular challenge of the project was to bridge the divide between the old-world charm of the village and the modern flair embodied in a holiday house for an internationally successful art gallery owner. The aim was to develop a formal language which had certain proximity to traditional Engadine architecture and yet remained immediately recognizable as contemporary without being conservatively romanticized. In urban planning terms, the building closed a permanent gap in the village structure whilst the dimensions correspond to those of the adjacent houses.

 

 

Over time the village was periodically hit by fires, meaning that the original timber structures disappeared and were replaced by the stone houses that give the settlement its indigenous character today. The use of concrete as the main building material pays justice to this stone appearance. Only the inner walls and ceilings of the living and bedrooms are lined in plywood paneling to give the warmth and comfort of the room and as an approximation of the traditional sheltered feeling of a mountain dwelling. The solidness of the ground story is likewise a common regional feature. The archaic is also reflected in the construction with the use of gas concrete, allowing the walls to be erected homogenously without layering. The resulting massiveness of the walls has a great similarity with traditional means of building and enabled the typical corbels of the window reveals. The windows are arranged according to interior criteria, giving the façade an informal appearance typical of old Engadine houses. The depth of the reveals creates an attractive play of shadows and roots the building firmly in the region.

 

Finally, the traditional and modernist elements of the sculptural volume blend into a unified whole. The interplay between simplicity, rural straightforwardness and contemporary comfort and architectural sophistication lend the house a very specific character, which pays respect to the village without being obsequious.

 

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