Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect

Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect

Asher 11:02 am 11:02 am

Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect located in Khet Ratchathewi, Thailand | The Hardt

 

Duplicate-Duplex (2018) by TOUCH Architect located in Khet Ratchathewi, Thailand.  A major pain point of staying in 690ft² (64 m²) of a duplex condominium unit, which is used for a home-studio for an animator and an artist, is that there is not enough space for the dwelling. Moreover, a double-volume space of living area with a huge glass curtain wall faces west. High temperature occurs all day long since it allows direct sunlight to come inside. In order to solve both mentioned problems, three additional items are proposed which are, GRID PARTITION, EXTENSION DECK, and STEPPING SPACE.

 

 

A glass partition not only dividing space between kitchen and living but also helps reduce electricity charge from air-conditioning. Grid-like of double glass frame is for stuff and stationery hanging, as to serve the owners’ activities. Extension deck would help filtrating heat from direct sunlight, since an existing high glass facade facing West. An existing staircase for going up to the second-floor bedroom is added by a proposed space above since this condominium unit has no enough space for dwelling or storage. In order to utilize the space in a small condominium, creating another staircase above the existing one helps increase the space. The grid partition and the extension deck help ‘decrease’ the electrical charge, while the extension deck and the stepping space help ‘increase’ the space for 120 ft² (11 m²).   

 

© Chalermwat Wongchompoo

 

 

Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects

Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects

Asher 10:26 am 10:26 am

Located in Torquay, Victoria, Australia, Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects | The Hardt

Located in Torquay, Victoria, Australia, Torquay House (2012) by Wolveridge Architects. This project attempts to challenge our traditional notions of how buildings can exist both in a coastal environment and in this case also the context of an emerging built form and character. In coastal conditions, buildings must be robust and defy the elements, yet create protective spaces, both internal and external which for us allow the occupants to feel safe, comfortable, privacy and enjoyment of good times. Whether the occupants are fulltime residents or weekenders, the beach house is a place to look forward to arriving, whether in the heat of the summer or the winter’s cold. With excellent views to the north and south and a conscious motivation to avoid the east/west outlooks, this project evolved as a series of interconnected and robustly finished containers. Each prescribed to a rigid set of rules and the relationship and spaces between containers becoming essential to the program and to the life of the building. The robust mass of the buildings is intended to be offset by the expression of finely considered detail and proportion. It is the private spaces created in between that allow natural ventilation and light, intimate outlooks, and privacy for the occupants, a place to call home.

 

 

© Derek Swalwell

 


 

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Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects

Asher 7:48 pm 7:48 pm

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia | The Hardt

 

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia. The clients for this project approached us around Easter in 2011. They are a young family from the city who had purchased this terrific sloping allotment just five minutes’ walk from back beach along Bass Strait. The landform was dominated by an awkward contour and it was clear that the site was halfway up a dune. The block to the west was the top of the dune and the vacant block to the east was the bottom. There was native vegetation, but it was sporadic and insignificant. We were briefed to provide a family home that would give plenty of outdoor space and play area for the kids and their friends, but most importantly the brief insisted that the feel of the house be quite divorced from reminders of life in the city. We studied the landform and we studied the planning requirements. We then prepared a building envelope, placing the dwelling as far to the rear (south) of the lot as possible, providing a terrific expanse of open space to the north. By the time we pushed the form back, it was significantly elevated.

 

As the founding materials are sand, we undertook a major rethink of the landform and the site’s contours by excavating under the dwelling area to create a large undercroft and lower ground floor rumpus area and used that fill to create a north facing quadrangle at the upper level. The result is an apparent single story, low slung dwelling on arrival. A further challenge contemplated the public aspect. The road is located north of the site, therefore a driveway for car parking and arrivals needed to consider how we might plan to make this open space private. We employed a permeable but physical barrier dissecting the public and private aspects of the dwelling. The form of the barrier, a series of free-standing steel sheets with 100mm gaps exists as a sculptural element in the landscape, evoking images of the found object. Access to the dwelling is external, via a garden path defined by a further device, a line of pillars constructed from rammed earth also emerging as objects in the landscape, seemingly molded by the conditions over time. This element clearly defines the public and private realms, yet provides crossovers and transitional spaces in the form of a sandpit, an outdoor shower area, and landscape planting zones. The dwelling itself is conceived over four main modules. Two main living zones separated by a services zone which is located directly over the rumpus room below. The fourth module is the semi roofed external living area, linking the dwelling interior with the landscape. The clients embraced a robust approach to the design of the dwelling. The plan form is rectilinear, with hallways wide enough for kids to ride their bikes. A second linking bbq deck completes the circuit. The materials are generally recycled timbers, with blackened plywood walls, a black ceiling which encourages the enjoyment of light and the externally framed views of the landscape. The bathrooms are glossy heat treated mild steel which reflects the color of the mosaic tiled floors and the shafts of light from the skylights. At night, the sheets imbue a warmth in the reflection of incandescent light.

 

 


 

One of the owners grew up in Eltham, a rural bushland retreat east of the city in a house designed by Alistair Knox. The imagery portrayed by the client of a childhood memory growing up in a Knox dwelling had a significant impact on the project. We considered the use of breeze block and concrete block to provide reminders and links back to notions of the surf clubhouse. Through the development of the design, these elements became more refined with the use of rammed earth and the implementation of laser cut screens employing one of the common motifs of the breeze block.

 

 

© Derek Swalwell

 


 

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Árborg House (2010) by PK Arkitektar

Árborg House (2010) by PK Arkitektar

Asher 7:29 am 7:30 am

Árborg House (2010) by PK Arkitektar situated in Árborg, Iceland | The Hardt

 

Árborg House (2010) by PK Arkitektar situated in Árborg, Iceland. The 2,755 ft² ( 256 m²) vacation home lies two hours to the east of Reykjavík, on the banks of Hvítá in the spectacular landscape of Iceland. The site is a moss-covered hill with a view over a quiet bend in the glacier-formed river. In the spring, the river carries straggling icebergs from the glacier towards the sea some 100 km away. The approach to the vacation house is from the top of the hill. The building is organized as a sequence of events: from the entrance porch through the closed courtyard into the living space and at last, out onto the terrace. Living, dining, kitchen, and master bedroom are all arranged in one continuous room. This permits panoramic views of the river and the distant mountains to the west. The exterior is a broken surface of light grey, fair-faced concrete. The gravel from the riverbed is blended into the concrete and is revealed in the broken surface. It harmonizes the outside walls with the moss of the surrounding landscape.

 

 

Leftover moss from the footprint of the house covers the roof. It was kept aside and regularly nursed during the building process, before being reinstalled on the roof. Doors and terraces are clad with teak boards that will gradually weather to a color grade to match the seasonal moss and the broken concrete surface. Fair-faced concrete walls throughout the entire interior are matched with untreated teak boards on floors and ceilings. Selected pebbles from the nearby riverbed cover the bottom of the infinity pool. The pool projects out in front of the terrace, acting as a non-obstructive railing, complementing the view of the river 

 

© Rafael Pinho

 


 

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Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor

Asher 3:42 pm 3:50 pm

 

 

 

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor located in Chur, Switzerland | The Hardt

 

Shelter For Roman Ruins by Peter Zumthor located in Chur, Switzerland. Peter Zumthor is a Swiss architect I put right up there with Tadao Ando as my all time favorite. Mr. Zumthor is responsible for designing a piece of architecture so stunning, it made me rethink the entire concept of what a building actually is, from a very rudimentary basis. The building is the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria by Peter Zumthor. I’ll do a post here and a full post on the site this week. But I digress, one of the first big projects for the 2009 Pritzker Prize-winning architect Peter Zumthor was this protective pavilion built to cover the remains of two Roman buildings. Built in 1985-86 and located in the capital of the Swiss canton of Graubünden.       

 

 


 

Chur is no less than the oldest town in Switzerland: the first settlements found at the site date to 3.500BC. In 15BC the Roman Empire conquered the village and designated Chur (Curia Raetorum) to be the capital of their new funded Roman province of Curia – hence the name Chur.  In those days the location at the right shore of the Rhine River was a strategic crossroad where several of the major Alpine transit routes came together before continuing down river. The Romans inhabited the area that is nowadays called Welschdörfli, just off the historic town center of Chur. In modern days archaeological excavations uncovered a complete Roman quarter. The authorities decided to preserve the excavations and to open them for public exhibition. Local Swiss architect Peter Zumthor was chosen as responsible for the design.

 


 

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Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect

Asher 8:58 am 8:58 am

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect located in Urada, Niigata, Japan | The Hardt

 

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect located in Urada, Niigata, Japan. The project was initiated following the collapse of the original Australia House (a 100-year-old Japanese farmhouse). It is essentially a disaster recovery project, but of a cultural type. The structure has been overdesigned so it can function as a refuge during future disasters.

Less than one year from the announcement of a competition to completion of construction. This required fantastic groundwork from the Australian Embassy, Tokyo, and rapid construction by the local contractors, Iizuka Constructions and Onojeima Constructions. Simple clear geometry that creates possibilities, rather shutting them down through excessive architectural authorship… The main gallery focusses on the embankment, rather than the dramatic valley view. In this way the embankment, tilted up, becomes the third wall of the gallery, creating opportunities for artists and curators to engage with the landscape.

 

 


 

By focussing on an ordinary view, rather than an extraordinary view, it seeks to remind us of the value of ordinary, local things, post GFC and post great east Japan Earthquake. A unique collaboration between artist and architect to embed a permanent work within the gallery. The work can be concealed by a large cedar clad panel. It is my hope that a new permanent work will be embedded in the gallery space at each Triennale, so in 15 years time you could walk into the space and reveal 6 compelling permanent works.

 


 

The design resonates with the many utilitarian structures in the region, a steep roof, direct expression and located close to the road so as to be easy to access during snowfall. I did not so much as reference these buildings when I was designing it, but followed the same basic logic that they follow. The steeply pitched roof form rises to the daikoku-bashira (king post), creating a tall gallery space within a compact volume. Despite its size (120 sqm), this building conveys an institutional quality, although it also has the ambiguous presence of a rural structure and an art object.

 

© Brett Boardman

 


 

 

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