The Hardt tr?id=338928643312774&ev=PageView&noscript=1 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of tr?id=338928643312774&ev=PageView&noscript=1
The Hardt Ron Rojas House Rene Gonzalez Architect %C2%A9 Michael Stavaridis  1080x675 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of Ron Rojas House Rene Gonzalez Architect %C2%A9 Michael Stavaridis  1080x675

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States | The Hardt

 

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States. The Key Biscayne Residence developed in response to its sub-tropical island environment. Pools are the principle, and ever-present, organizing elements of the series of living spaces, providing a feeling of coolness in the bright Miami light. Moving through the house, the experiences shift from being outdoors in a vertical space that is enveloped with walls of clay louvers, to entering a horizontally organized living area surrounded by glass doors that can entirely open to breezeways and pools.

 

 


 

The Key Biscayne Residence is depictive of the Latin cultural environment that surrounds it, including the client for whom it was designed. The South Florida community has many Latin American residents and the intent was to design a contemporary, comfortable house within a condition inclusive of many Mediterranean-style homes that are embedded in these cultural conditions. As a result, many architectural elements are utilized that are inherent to the Latin tradition including patios, Portales (porches), and persianas (louvered screens). The use of materials and overall layout present a series of spatial experiences defined by light and shadow and permeable connections between interior and exterior. Implicitly interpreting the persianas, which filter light as well as mitigate heat, terracotta brick louver systems were selected in three types: a more traditional and regular horizontal pattern, pivoting vertical panels, and textural, more solid bricks.

 

The house itself is a series of interlocking and overlapping volumes with voids, allowing for spatial complexity and spaces that snake through the house. Because the floor level is elevated to be free from flooding, one must ascend to enter. The reflecting pools at the entry and visible pool at the rear of the house contribute to the sensory, floating quality of this private home.

 

© Michael Stavaridis

 


 

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The Hardt Le Cabanon Rick Joy Architects 3 1080x1000 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of Le Cabanon Rick Joy Architects 3 1080x1000

Le Cabanon by Rick Joy Architect located on Venetian Road Settlement, Turks and Caicos Islands

Le Cabanon by Rick Joy Architect located on Venetian Road Settlement, Turks and Caicos Islands | The Hardt

 

Le Cabanon by Rick Joy Architect located on Venetian Road Settlement, Turks and Caicos Islands. Near the southwest coast of the Providenciales, an island in the Turks and Caicos archipelago, Rick Joy Architects designed a family retreat whose privacy and quietness are cut through by the coastal breezes and long rays of the tropical sun. On approach from the adjacent road, the multipartite complex appears to organically grow out of the site’s natural coastline, its subtly textured eggshell concrete contrasting the bright turquoise water in the same way as the white sand that lines the shallow inlet. Taking visual cues from lush surroundings, which also include iron shore rock and verdant native vegetation, the architects produced tactile links between the building and its site: mahogany doors, windows, and ceilings capture the warmth of the surroundings, while small, precisely placed openings let just the right doses of greenery inside.

 

 


 

The plan of the house is deceptively simple: a generously sized terrace serves as the link between the private living areas to the west and a living-dining-kitchen pavilion to the east. This first volume, a long, slender bar, shields the rest of the house from the noise and movement on the adjacent street. The strategy works—from the interior, the spaces feel secluded and protected, and the ocean views from the kitchen pavilion seem entirely exclusive. This space sits quietly against the water, not quite indoors and not quite outdoors. Its asymmetric single-hip roof captures a generous interior space, and a single operable triangular window at its leeward tip creates gentle airflow, supplementing the deliberately designed cross-breezes that negate the need for air conditioning. Just outside, a shallow pool cuts a line between the sand and the adjoining terrace, bringing the expanse of ocean water ever closer to the living spaces.

 

 

The entire house is full of immersive moments like this one. From the corridors, the concrete walls create shallow view-angles that reveal glimpses of each subsequent space and simultaneously frame the sky above. Constructed by local builders trained by the construction team, the walls used locally sourced sand and aggregate, minimizing the need to import building materials. In a similar resource-conscious spirit, the architects placed a large cistern beneath the main terrace to harvest water and topped the flat sections of the roof with photovoltaic panels. In the bedrooms, pendant lights hang like flower buds from the ceiling and long fronds peek in from the adjacent rock-bottomed gardens. Natural linen curtains billow in the ocean breeze and let through just the right amount of sunlight. Sometimes, fishermen pull up to the Ipé docks, offering the day’s catch. The result is a home that seems to bloom out of its site.

 

Photos by © Joe Fletcher  

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The Hardt PM House Cadaval Sola%CC%80 Morales 1 1080x675 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of PM House Cadaval Sola%CC%80 Morales 1 1080x675

Located in Puerto Morelos, Mexico, PM House by Cadaval & Solà-Morales

Located in Puerto Morelos, Mexico, PM House by Cadaval & Solà-Morales | The Hardt

 

Located in Puerto Morelos, Mexico, PM House (2017) by Cadaval & Solà-Morales. The plot is located at the edge of the mangrove swamp of Puerto Morelos, about fifty kilometers south of Cancun, at the Riviera Maya; beyond the mangrove are the unique colors of the Caribbean Sea. The property is surrounded by lush vegetation, typical of its watery condition. Nevertheless, with the height that the project grants to the future house, the sea will be seen, thus the views will be evolving from floor to floor: from the intense green to the clear blue of the sky and the water. This will be the last of a series of row houses and will have a small backyard. Access is provided from this street, and although little transited at the moment, it has a public use. The architectural project wants to reinforce the neutral identity of the house towards the street, and prevent openings while concentrating all the magic to the interior. The domestic space is built around a staircase that qualifies the central space of the house and articulates the necessarily vertical character of the construction. The sculptural staircase serves as a backdrop to the living room, a diaphanous space whose height and proportions qualify it as the main and nodal space of the house; the living room, on its turn, is widely open to the garden, and to the lush vegetation. The house is closed completely towards the south, where the street is, but also to the sun, which becomes almost unbearable in these latitudes. The stair rests against this south façade and behaves as a structural spine that organizes the functioning of the house, and that leads you to all the rooms that open towards the north and to the views of the mangrove and the sea.

 

 

 


 

The rooms, located in the upper part of the house, are voluntarily plain and simple, just holding a bathroom and responding to the sole premise of orienting the bed to the views and always endowing them with a large terrace to benefit from living in the open air. In this way, the south facade of the house is hard, closed and opaque, while the north facade is more permeable and ductile. The construction and finishes of the house seek to be as austere as possible, using the simpler construction techniques such as load walls. All are painted in a continuous color. In the end, it is the space, with its opening to the mangrove, to the sea, the vegetation and to the white north light, the main protagonist of the house.

 

 
© Sandra Pereznieto
 

 

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The Hardt Residence in Formentera Island Maria%CC%80 Castello%CC%81 Marti%CC%81nez 9 1080x1000 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of Residence in Formentera Island Maria%CC%80 Castello%CC%81 Marti%CC%81nez 9 1080x1000

Residence in Formentera Island (2017) by Marià Castelló Martínez

Residence in Formentera Island (2017) by Marià Castelló Martínez located in Platja de Migjorn, Spain | The Hardt

 

Residence in Formentera Island (2017) by Marià Castelló Martínez located in Platja de Migjorn, Spain. Bosc d’en Pep Ferrer is the traditional name for a large stretch of land located next to Migjorn beach, on the south coast of Formentera Island. In it, there is a place that fosters the desire to inhabit a panoramic dream where the horizon is only intersected by the beautiful silhouette of the Tower des Pi des Català, erected in 1763. The project is created from this duality between the telluric and the tectonic. The heavy and the light. Earth and air. The artisanal and the technological. The effort to compress and tensile strength. The rock that surfaces superficially in the chosen place was carved as if it were a sculpture, offering avoid that goes back to the quarries of ‘marès’. Space materialized with a single stone. Monolithic. Megalithic. Stereotomic. The intervention concerns a housing for an environmentally concerned family whose program is divided into three light dry modules and the void generated by the subtraction of the matter on the lower floor. This longitudinal arrangement gives way to empty-filled successions, courtyards, connecting walkways, cross-sectional views and the surprise discovery of a time-sculpted space: a natural cave in the main access yard that during the works was integrated into the whole.

 

 


 

 

The structure is easily intelligible and manifests itself in three layers with upward precision levels: in the lower floor it is evident the absence of retaining walls aggregated to the rocky substrate, as well as the appearance of a small concrete structure that regularizes the upper level of such plant and is the support platform on the ground floor. On the upper floor, as if it were a real-scale mock-up, the bi-supported structure is evidenced from the inside, where it became apparent in most of the work, converging in a single element (cross-laminated wood panels) several functions: structure, sealing and finishing.  The nobility of the materials used and their unions are present in the design and execution process. Under the criteria of bioconstruction were those of natural origin and, where possible, of the place itself: sculpted rock, gravel from the excavation itself, limestone Capri, pine and fir wood, panels of recycled cotton, macael white marble, high permeability, etc. This is reversed in hygroscopic and water vapor permeable seals, which allow a more pleasant interior environment with less energetic contributions for a correct functioning. At the environmental level, the proposal incorporates passive bioclimatic systems of proven efficacy in this climate, as well as self-sufficiency of water thanks to a large cistern that reuses rainwater.

 

Courtesy of Marià Castelló Martínez

 

If you vibed with this project make sure you peep the projects below. Spatial. Aesthetics. On. Point.

 

 


 

The Hardt house in suma japan tomohiro hata The Hardt8 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of house in suma japan tomohiro hata The Hardt8

House in Tarumi by Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates

House in Tarumi by Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates located in Kobe, Japan | The Hardt

 

House in Tarumi by Tomohiro Hata Architect and Associates located in Kobe, Japan. “The site is located in a typically developed area along the slopes of Kobe. The slope was scraped off, but the terrain still shows that character. Since the geographical condition has decided factors like wind direction, abundant sunlight, and vegetation, we thought it is important to conceive an architecture that receives and enjoys the natural environment such as daylighting and ventilation, and also give good effect to the ambiance by making it a space composition close to the terrain. Moreover, we thought about how human beings will inhabit this architecture; which restores the environment with the slope including the surroundings. Hence, we aimed at a space where the client could literally “live on the slope”, where the inside harmoniously continues with the outside while moving back and forth between the two. In order to make these two elements compatible, we were faced with the issue of how to freely arrange the space across the floor, how to arbitrate the shift of the upper and lower floor.

We decided to lay down walls laminated with arches that successfully organizes the plan of shifting the structure between the upper and lower level, by receiving the force from above in a pyramidal shape. Accordingly, the space composition changes from the front to the back, by connecting the walls like a Romanesque façade. This makes the architecture not resist the dynamics but allow free space stacking. Through the conception and practice of this architecture, we hope to show an example of a way to adopt the terrain with slopes and to embody the richness of living in slopes obediently.”

 

 

© Toshiyuki Yano

 


 

Visually similar spatial aesthetics below

The Hardt Villa SR Reitsema and Partners Architects 004 1080x675 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of Villa SR Reitsema and Partners Architects 004 1080x675

Villa RR by Reitsema and Partners Architects situated in Rijssen, The Netherlands

Villa RR by Reitsema and Partners Architects situated in Rijssen, The Netherlands | The Hardt

 

Villa RR by Reitsema and Partners Architects situated in Rijssen, The Netherlands.  How do you transform a 50-year-old villa into a comfortable, contemporary, sustainable home? To find the answer, the architect Theo Reitsema and the interior designer Stephanie Weitering, who are married to each other, spent a year living in a 1967-built house in the Dutch community of Rijssen, looking, listening and feeling. They and their two young children settled in the villa, set in the middle of the forest. Together they explored the possibilities presented by the house and its location. Reitsema and Weitering made discoveries during that first year that would inform the house’s transformation. For instance, the family occupied the villa through all seasons. Living on a hill in the forest means you’re surrounded by greenery in summer. Since the thick foliage provides shade, the house doesn’t need any sun protection or air conditioning beyond an overhang on the west side. And in winter, the low sun warms the house and its occupants can see for hundreds of meters through the branches.

 


 

During the metamorphosis, Reitsema and Weitering took full advantage of Villa RR’s hilltop position. The house comprises two stories on the east side and one on the west. The application of dark stucco to the lower floor, which contains a double garage and a home office, turned it into a sort of plinth for the floor above, where the living and sleeping areas are located. The upper story is given a distinctive appearance by a new wooden facade, which is relatively close on the east side and fully open on the west. The front door marks the transition between the two sections. A playful outdoor staircase gives the entrance extra appeal.

 

 


 

Reitsema and Weitering might not have thought of building the house lengthwise on the deep lot, precisely along the east-west axis. But they applaud the decision by the original architect, J. Abma. The house’s orientation allows for views of both the north and south sides of the garden from the living room. To maximize enjoyment of the landscape, Villa RR has been extended with a glass volume at the western end. The roof is supported by four slender (38mm) chromed columns that reflect the landscape, enhancing the panoramic views from the living room.

 


 

The transformation has kept the living spaces on the west side of the house and the bedrooms on the east. Between the bedrooms and the living room is the garden room. In contrast to the light, airy living room, the garden room is more enclosed. The use of timber cladding continues on the garden room’s walls, transforming it into a veranda when the bi-fold doors are opened fully and creating a smooth transition between the interior and the flower garden. The architects have taken a number of steps to ensure that the house will continue to provide a high level of comfort in the future. They have installed a heat recovery system, triple glazing, high-quality insulation, LED lighting and energy-efficient appliances, making Villa RR nearly energy-neutral and ready for the next 50 years.

 

© Ronald Tilleman

 


 

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The Hardt Flower Cage House Anonym 3 1080x675 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of Flower Cage House Anonym 3 1080x675

Flower Cage House by Anonym located in Bangkok, Thailand

Flower Cage House (2017) by Anonym located in Bangkok, Thailand | The Hardt

 

Flower Cage House by Anonym located in Bangkok, Thailand. “Flower cage house” is a former housing estate size 60 sq.wa with an internal area of 300 sq.m. The owner wants to renovate the house that was over 10 years to provide space that suits the needs to its full capacity. From a home survey, architects have proposed to adjust the interior space, bring in natural light and add the multipurpose area over the original garage. Ground floor, at the main living area we smashing most of the solid wall and introduce steel frame glazing panels. Extend the extra space behind the house to meet the demands of increased usage and pull natural light into the house. Because it locates on the north side so we only bring the light but not the heat and with extra windows, they enhance better ventilation. The main entrance has been adjusted to the pace to walk home and make it more interesting.

 

 


 

The garage area is improved by removing the old pole structure. Then rebuild new steel structure building over to have a multi-purpose area on the 2nd floor, which can be connected to master bedroom. Underneath, the area has been refreshed by creating fish ponds. The iron stairs above the pond lead to the multi-purpose area, act as the area’s features. The upstairs interior is collapsed and transformed into a penthouse. This floor is truly a private residence, consisting of a master bedroom, living area, dressing room and connecting bathroom. The new building represents the owner character who is strong, energetic, yet gentle and sensitive at the same time. It is reinforced with aggressive steel structure but it still feels light. Increase the tenderness with the olive tree pots that are specifically designed by ceramic artists, the symbol of freedom placed between the space of the entire frame of 102 trees to enhance the uniqueness of this house.

 

© Ketsiree Wongwan

 


 

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The Hardt Laurelhurst MidCentury mwworks architecture design 03 Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect Architecture Courtyard Design Minimal Modern  USA Rene Gonzalez Architect Michael Stavaridis Key Biscayne Florida 2017   Image of Laurelhurst MidCentury mwworks architecture design 03

Laurelhurst MidCentury by mw|works architecture + design

Laurelhurst MidCentury by mw|works architecture + design located in Seattle, United States | The Hardt

 

Laurelhurst MidCentury by mw|works architecture + design located in Seattle, United States. Designed by Ibsen Nelsen in 1961, the layout of this home was very well considered but the character and flow between spaces wasn’t a good fit for the daily patterns of the new owners. High on the owner’s wish list were increased physical and visual connections between rooms and to the outdoors. A central feature of the original design was a courtyard garden, experienced primarily through the living room. A careful reconsideration of the openings surrounding this space reframed it as a tranquil organizing element of the house, central not just to the living room but also to the entry, the daily circulation paths and the more informal spaces of the home. Single pane windows were replaced and extended floor to ceiling. Upgraded insulation and high-efficiency radiant floor heat allowed the removal of ductwork and low ceilings, dramatically reducing the home’s energy consumption. The new project is updated and more livable but still respectful of the best elements of the original design.

 

 

© Jeremy Bittermann

 


 

 

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