Courtyard House by Inarc Architects

Courtyard House by Inarc Architects

Courtyard House by Inarc Architects located in Melbourne, Australia | The Hardt 

 

Courtyard House by Inarc Architects located in Melbourne, Australia. Australian firm Inarc aimed to find a middle ground between luxury and efficiency for this holiday house, built beside a seafront golf course on the outskirts of Melbourne.  The single-story Links Courtyard House features a simple layout, designed to make the most of space, but also features several luxuries, including a spacious terrace and swimming pool. The ambition was to offer the clients everything they desired, but also to respond to the growing pressures from Australian city planning departments to keep houses within certain size limits.

 


 

“Today’s urban residential design is under pressure to become smaller and more efficient,” explained the Melbourne-based studio, which is led by architect Reno Rizzo and interior designer Christopher Hansson. “Increases in population, housing density, smaller block sizes and increased building costs are resulting in greater scrutiny with regards to the size of dwellings.” But, according to the team, these rules aren’t yet extending beyond cities. So this house – located on Mornington Peninsula, a popular holiday spot south of Melbourne – didn’t necessarily have to adhere to them. Instead, it serves as an example for the future.

 

 


 

Inarc describes it as “efficient in layout, yet extravagant in the way it draws inspiration from its surroundings”. Its compact L-shaped plan wraps around an expansive courtyard garden, including a colonnade-inspired patio deck, a 10-meter-long swimming pool and rock garden filled with different plants. The house’s entrance is located at the western end of the site and leads through to a long corridor that forms the spine of the building – a tactic the team previously used for a rusty steel retreat in nearby Red Hill. A garage with room for two cars is positioned to the left of these entrance, while three en-suite bedrooms are arranged in sequence on the right. Floor-to-ceiling windows span the entire length of the corridor, ensuring plenty of daylight fills the house and creating a continuous view out to the garden. Beyond the bedrooms, the corridor opens out to an open-plan living space, with a kitchen at one end, a dining room in the middle and a lounge at the far end.

 


 

Materials were chosen for the interior and exterior of the building reinforce the aim for a sense of luxury. Externally, the house is clad with horizontal lengths of grey-stained blackbutt – an Australian hardwood – but also features several large steel elements. Inside, oak floorboards run through the house and also cover the ceilings. The architects avoided building fences around the property and instead used crepe myrtle trees to offer privacy. Because of this, the courtyard garden can be glimpsed from the street and the neighboring golf course.”The landscape of our own courtyard garden was designed to be seen from both sides of the property and was consciously planned as an extension of the golf landscape,” said the team. “The diminutive crepe myrtle trees provide a fine screen of privacy without obstructing welcome sunshine and views.” The Mornington Peninsula has been a favorite holiday destination for Melbourne residents for decades and is also a notable wine region. As a result, it is home to a number of impressive architect-designed houses.

 

images via inarc.com
Words via Dezeen

 


 

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South Yarra Residence by Carr Design Group

South Yarra Residence by Carr Design Group

South Yarra Residence by Carr Design Group situated in Melbourne, Australia | The Hardt

 

South Yarra Residence by Carr Design Group situated in Melbourne, Australia. Located in Melbourne’s Domain precinct this 1929 built residence originally began as two duplexes, one of which was originally inhabited by the famous Australian artists-collectors Sunday and John Reed before they move to the Heide property (which after their death became the Heide Museum of Modern Art). Merging historic architecture with a contemporary, cantilevered addition, the old and the new are now joined with wide shadow recesses and textural change where the achromatic color palette of matte black steel, polished black timber flooring, cement walls and polished aluminum reflects the transparency of the modern design

 

 


 

The architectural masterplan sought to celebrate the original structure and well-proportioned spaces whilst updating them to provide a cohesive series of interior spaces to suit a family of five. A bold two-story glazed structure was added to the rear west face of the property to bring light into the heart of the home, defining a new circulation core to the building. A large glazed skylight tracks the path of the sun throughout the day, filling the interior with light. Openings are lined with the introduction of steel portals and framing devices for reveals, panels, and blades, marking the transition from original form to contemporary space, existing built form with that of the new, highly contemporary addition.

 

Photo © Carr Design Group

 


 

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Sub-Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin

Sub-Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin

Sub-tropical Melbourne Garden by Sydney landscape designer Myles Baldwin | The Hardt

 

The owners of this Melbourne garden wanted to give it a non-Melbourne look, so they asked Sydney landscape designer Myles Baldwin to help them rework it. The result is a garden that features larger, more exotic foliage in defiance of the usual cooler-climate trends.

 

Image of Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden 2

 

(1/6) The entry garden displays layered texture, with a transplanted Japanese maple, Agave attenuate, assorted succulents and soft underplanting.

 

Image of Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden 3

 

(2/6) An imposing bronze sculpture by Australian-American artist Clement Meadmore makes a statement in the entry garden, under a canopy of transplanted maples, lush foliage and clipped English box (Buxus sempervirens).

 

Image of Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden

 

(3/6) Clipped grey germander contrasts with subtropical cycads at the side of the tennis court.

 

Image of Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden 7

 

(4/6) French fiber cement pots are planted with fan aloes (Aloe plicatilis) and Senecio.

 

Image of Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden 8

 

(5/6) The classic Gothic revival house is accented by the newly transplanted Canary Island date palm. The palm was just one super-advanced plants freighted down from Sydney to provide instant impact and maturity.

 

Image of Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden 0

 

(6/6) A geometric tiled wall catches the eye. The layered planting scheme also extends to the vertical surfaces in the garden. On the courtyard walls, English ivy (Hedera helix) and Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) are planted together, with Asian jasmine (Trachelospermum asiaticum) spilling over from the top.

 


 

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https://thehardt.com/marine-vessels/magnum-80-designed-pininfarina-magnum-marine/

 


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Armadale Residence by BE Architecture

Armadale Residence by BE Architecture

Armadale Residence by BE Architecture located in Melbourne, Australia | The Hardt

 

Armadale Residence by BE Architecture located in Melbourne, Australia. The general feeling of the three-story residence in Melbourne, Australia, is the lightness, almost an ethereal and floating quality created by the sun refracted on the granite facade. This is a contradiction with the reality of the 260 tons of granite that make up the skin of the building. The use of materiality and details also provides a similar contradiction in form. The natural texture and irregularity of the two-sided material blur the hard lines of the stacked rectilinear building. Although the building is strong, it rests silently on its surroundings.

 


 

The use of three types of granite unifies the external and internal spaces. While all materials are substantial, when used together, there is uniformity throughout the house. For this to work, the architectural detail was integrated with the fine craftsmanship of the builders and masons. Working together, we were able to create a subtle variation in the materials and intricate details where the slight change in the finish makes the same material fit different functions or applications. In some places, this required thinking of atypical applications for stone, working with suppliers to drive custom fabrications to add to the general unification, especially in the master bathroom where a custom tub and sink were designed from solid blocks of stone.

 

 


 

While there is room in the structure, the internal spaces are light and open, particularly in the living room where the fully retractable glass doors open onto the adjacent patio. The program for the house responded to customers, who were reducing their size from a large family home to one that was more concentrated. While it still accommodates the rooms for adult children who visit, the house focuses primarily on its use by the couple. The rooms are specially designed to meet your needs, including a shared study and an extra-large master bathroom that includes a private outdoor shower in an isolated Japanese garden. This is a particularly unexpected detail in an urban property.

 


 

With a holistic approach, the internal multidisciplinary design team considered all the elements of landscaping and interiors within the architectural plans. The landscaping responds to the desire of the clients to have different views and terraces planted without the maintenance of only grass. Behind the privacy fence, showing little to the street, a grove of Monte Fugi planted with rosemary, greets visitors when they enter the site. The kitchen and other living spaces direct the view of the low maintenance plantations on the terrace.

 

© Peter Clarke

 


 

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Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11

Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11

Located in Allens Rivulet, Australia, Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11 | The Hardt

 

Located in Allens Rivulet, Australia, Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11. A defined grid relating to the various uses set the kitchen at its center, becoming slightly deformed as rooms were angled towards particular views. Revolving around this hardt the house eventually lifts to peer over the first level ring and towards Mt Wellington. Voids allow the hardt to be visible from various spaces within the house. The compact plan is extended via the positioning of voids and linked external areas. Internal and external spaces are blurred at one extreme and highly contained in others.


The house has a duality of character and experience defined by the way it responds to context and use. On approach its angular and severe form is a toughened abstract container, bracing itself against the robust Tasmanian landscape and weather conditions. Passing through the “hollowed out” portals, the warm and sheltering underbelly is exposed and acts as a protective envelope. These areas of in-between, outside but surrounded by the building’s form, are a result of a considered approach to outdoor living within typical Tasmanian weather condition, ie “4 seasons in one day”. They allow one to sit in the sunshine but avoid the cold winter wind, or alternatively sit outdoors and avoid the harsh high UV summer sun. The spaces shift from fully enclosed to semi-enclosed, with roof and without, culminating in a roof deck for maximum exposure and view

 

 


The client’s wish for the kitchen to be the heart of the home generated the internal layout. A defined grid relating to the various uses set the kitchen at its center, becoming slightly deformed as rooms were angled towards particular views. Revolving around this heart the house eventually lifts to peer over the first level ring and towards Mt Wellington. Voids allow the heart to be visible from various spaces within the house. The compact plan is extended via the positioning of voids and linked external areas. Internal and external spaces are blurred at one extreme and highly contained in others. Dark metallic cladding was employed for low maintenance and to allow the building to recede into the shadows of the hill-scape when viewed from afar. Entry points and areas for outdoor living were conceptually cleaved out of the metallic box and lined with “warm” timber. The house employs a suspended concrete slab through the living area for thermal mass, absorbing the heat transferred through glass walls to the north. Natural ventilation operates via airflow through the connecting adjacent tree voids.

 

Photos by Ben Hosking


 

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