Residence Gardens (2017) by Drucker Architects and Associates

Residence Gardens (2017) by Drucker Architects and Associates

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Residence Gardens (2017) by Drucker Architects and Associates located in the Jardins, Sao Paulo, Brazil | The Hardt

 

Residence Gardens (2017) by Drucker Architects and Associates located in the Jardins, Sao Paulo, Brazil, a set of neighborhoods single-family family houses and tree mass protected by the historical patrimony, this house has 550sqm of built area, divided into two floors, ground and upper. The original terrain had a slope of four meters of height in relation to the level of the street. With this in the ground, we put the garage, warehouses, technical facilities, part of services, dependencies of employees with canopy and accesses by stairs internal and external.

 

 


 

The upper deck has been installed at the top of the existing slope and juts out onto the ground floor, which is just above street level. On the upper floor the program was organized around a central patio, whose U-shaped plan is articulated by a circulation, with washbasin, internal staircase, kitchen cupboard and an intimate room, and by two wings parallel to the external road. The closest wing to the street houses a large Living Room with Living Room, Dining Room, Home Theater, and Balconies. In the back, wing we have a sequence of four suites, the last being the master suite.

 

 

The construction, of reinforced concrete apparent by slats of wood, has components in steel, wood, and glass, marked materials in the set. The floor, in travertine Roman marble of internal environment, was also used in the external area, and the absence of unevenness highlights the continuity between exterior and interior (there is a system of rainwater capture built into the stones). One of the highlights of the project was the brusses of the master suite, which now function as a sunroof (it modulates the entrance of light to its total fence), and sometimes as doors to open.

 

 


 

This residence is designed to promote personal renewal and well being, through spaces where the landscape and architecture meet to replenish and invigorate the spirit. So the central courtyard has a contemplative vertical garden, trees with a small grassy area and a swimming pool, with transshipment all around it promoting a sense of water mirror that reflects this garden. This patio, together with the extensive glass doors of the sliding doors of the two wings and also of the twelve pivotal glass doors of the front facade, allows the residents the direct contact of the whole residence with the exterior and its large tree mass.

 


 

Internally we look for a dichotomy created by the walls of apparent slatted concrete and the lightness of the frames in large glass cloths that open completely to the vertical garden patio and to the huge existing trees of the street and the surroundings. In order to accentuate the light entering the large front room (east side) a structured setting with a metal pergola with glass in the cover and pivoting doors also in transparent glasses was designed. This arrangement provided an unusual interaction with the treetops, which seem to invade the interior of this large concrete hall, with no pillars in the middle. The house also has rainwater reuse, solar energy capture, cross ventilation, windows with heat treatment, thermal insulation of polystyrene in the roof, digital lighting control, recycled wood,

 

© Ruben Otero

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

Casa del Valle (2017) by David Guerra

CASA-FABER (2014) by ONG & ONG Pte Ltd

DS House (2015) by Studio Arthur Casas

 

 


 

Jungle House (2015) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo

Jungle House (2015) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo

Located in Guarujá, Brazil, Jungle House (2015) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo | The Hardt

 

Located in Guarujá, Brazil, Jungle House (2015) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo. The project is located on the Paulista shore in the region of the Rain Forest and the land has a mountainous topography with dense vegetation. The introduction of this house to this landscape has the objective of optimizing the connection between architecture and nature, privileging the view looking out to the ocean and the incidence of sunlight in the internal spaces.  Furthermore, the positioning of the house on the site obeyed the previously-open area in the vegetation.   The main volume of the house is elevated from the ground and seems built into the topography.  The house, therefore, projects itself out from the mountain. The contact elements between the slope and the construction – as for example the wooden decks – were shaped to respect the existing land, thereby creating an organic interaction between nature and the architectural elements. In the part that it comes out of the mountain, the structure touches the ground with only two pillars.

 

The 3 floors of Jungle House create a clear programmatic division for the project: the ground floor houses a large covered wooden deck, connected to a small room for the children; on the first floor there are six bedrooms – five of them with small verandas with hammocks – and a tv room; the third and last floor is the social area of the house, including a swimming pool, a living room, and the kitchen.    Thus, the architecture defined an inverted vertical organization of the program when compared to what is usually done in single-family houses: while the pool and the social areas are on the roof, the bedrooms are located on the floor below. The deck is on the ground floor- protected by the projection of the house – is an ample and generous space that configures a shaded shelter for the children to play.  The utility rooms are also located on this story.

 

 


 

From the wooden deck on the ground floor starts the stairs to access the house volume that “interrupts” the concrete slab. Before entering the closed space, one passes an intermediary space, enveloped by concrete and which houses a luminous work by the artist Olafur Eliasson.  The interiors project sought to create a modern atmosphere, offering a cozy feeling necessary to remain in this tropical environment. The landscape recomposes the native species.  When one is in the house, the relationship with the surrounding vegetation occurs not only through the view but also through the plants that surround the wooden decks.  On the ground floor, you can stroll in the midst of trees; on the first floor, light enters filtered through the tree-tops; and on the roof, there is the vegetation with the ocean in the background. The architecture of the house privileged the use of exposed concrete and wood, as much in the interior spaces as well as the exterior.  The bedrooms have wooden sun-screens, small brises-soleil, mounted as folding doors that can be manipulated by the users according to the climatic needs.

 

In the Jungle House, the project began with a transversal cut which allowed for the positioning of the pool to be semi-built-in to the slab thereby not losing any area on the floor below.  Furthermore, the infinity pool, as well as the raised border relative to the height of the deck, make it such that the view and the landscape serve as an extension of the pool waterline. To lessen the height of the top floor and thus get an external proportion more horizontal to this volume, the floor in the living room was lowered by 27 cm relative to the external wooden deck.

 

 


 

This last floor offers a spatial sensation which synthesizes the principles of the house: on one side, there is a deck which houses the hot tub and the sauna – where there is an intense relationship between the architecture and the mountain and its vegetation; on the other side, a ground fireplace and the pool; in the center – between these two free spaces – in the living room open to both sides and with cross-ventilation.  This social space has a radical relation with nature, by means of both the view of the ocean as well as the proximity to the forest in the mountain.

 

 

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

 


 

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DS House (2015) by Studio Arthur Casas

DS House (2015) by Studio Arthur Casas

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DS House (2015) by Studio Arthur Casas located in Sao Paulo, Brasil | The Hardt

 

DS House (2015) by Studio Arthur Casas located in Sao Paulo, Brasil. This project is a large renovation of a house designed in the eighties by Italian-Brazilian architect Ugo di Pace. The client, whose grown-up children left the family home, aimed for functionality and further integration between spaces now inhabited only by a couple. The volume of the house occupied almost the entire surface of the narrow and deep plot. It was characterized by the robustness of the structure, with few openings, highlighted by cylindrical concrete columns in the front and the rear façades, containing pillars and hydraulic installations. Small gestures brought fluidity to the architecture, such as enlarging the openings to let in the sunlight and create views towards the gardens. With an intense social life, the client paid special attention to the redesign of common areas for hosting parties. The ground floor is divided between a block on the street side, holding the garage, kitchen and service areas, and another one where the living room and dining room are oriented towards the backyard.

 


 

The main entrance is made through a corridor that runs along one of the sides of the plot. The swimming pool was enlarged to have a section transformed into a 20m swimming rink that suggests continuity between this corridor and the backyard. A circular skylight was created in front of the entrance door, upon entering the house one sees a massive piece of millwork that seems to float due to its cantilevered structure. It forms an axis that distributes the accesses to the living room, dining room, pantry, and kitchen.

 

 

 


 

Openings were enlarged and glass doors were added to bring within the house the atmosphere created by the vertical gardens that occupy the perimeter of the plot. A pergola protects a space for outdoor meals, next to the wooden deck in front of the swimming pool made out of travertine marble. A bench inside the pool extends along one of its sides, concealing the lighting. In the living room, the cylindrical column holds a hearth whereas the dark Brazilian teak staircase was kept from the original project, contrasting with the light tones of the interior design. The home theater in the first floor is continuous to the double height ceiling of the living room with a photo selection of Sebastião Salgado. A fitness room, constantly used by the clients, also functions as a corridor that gives access to the master suite, with a large skylight dominating the space. Two separate closets and bathrooms were created for the couple and a guest room that opens to a small courtyard was renovated. All the enclosed spaces receive natural light from solar tubes.

 


 

The façade was divided into two horizontal sections, one with the expanded openings in the ground floor and another made with a wooden moucharabieh that encase the first floor. The structural cylinders are tangent to these panels, creating waves that soften the preexisting volume. The materials employed were travertine marble on the ground floor and American oak in the private areas flooring and millwork. This renovation creates a refreshing atmosphere for a house occupied by the clients for decades. Functional and simple, the project updates usages and establishes a blur between inside and outside, blending small landscapes that bring natural light, greenery, and fluidity to the architecture.

 

 

Photography by Ricardo Labougle

 

 

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Casa Gres by Luciano Kruk

Casa Gres by Luciano Kruk

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Casa Gres by Luciano Kruk located in Itauna, Minas Gerais, Brazil | The Hardt

 

Casa Gres by Luciano Kruk located in Itauna, Minas Gerais, Brazil. This 1,937 ft² (180 m²) project starts from the request of a client who already had made another project of a summer house several years before, so he knew how we work at the Studio. This person now lives in Brazil with her partner, developing both a life based on the production and teaching of handmade pottery and they asked us to project a home-atelier, with two differentiated sectors, but where the sector of the house could receive exhibitions of ceramic pieces. The land is located in a semi-rural area outside of the small town of Itauna, some 80km from Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. The area is mountainous and has an exuberant vegetation, so the whole land is completely filled with different species of native tall trees and another type of lower vegetation.

 

 


 

The project aimed to preserve and utilize the magnificent vegetation, incorporating it into the house and the atelier, through strategically located patios for the organization of the various fields, separating the atelier of the rest of the house also sectorizing the bedroom area. For the work to be built without problems, given its distance away from the Studio that prevents us from making a normal track of it, we simplify the project as much as possible, so for this work we thought it as two parallel slabs of exposed concrete, one for the floor to be about rising about 50cm of the ground, and the other forming the roof, supported by a grid of steel columns, which get it included in the perimeter of the glass enclosures. For the divisions inside the house, we developed a series of wooden panels of simple construction. Part of the fixed equipment (desks, countertops, desks) was also designed in reinforced concrete to reduce costs.

 

Collaborators: Belén Ferrand – Ekaterina Allaria – Andrés Conde Blanco

 


 

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House in Butantã (1964) by Paulo Mendes da Rocha and João de Gennaro

House in Butantã (1964) by Paulo Mendes da Rocha and João de Gennaro

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House in Butantã (1964) by Paulo Mendes da Rocha and João de Gennaro located in Sao Paulo, Brazil | The Hardt

 

 

House in Butantã (1964) by Paulo Mendes da Rocha and João de Gennaro located in Sao Paulo, Brazil. If the two transverse beams of the ends of the cover slab formed to form the outer gables of the main floor, they would meet perfectly with the perimeter of the floor slab. If the longitudinal beams did not advance twenty centimeters in balance by holding and pushing the outer concrete gables away from the beams, there would be no room for the upper gutter and there would be no breach in the main floor to indirectly illuminate the interior. If on the sides of this floor were not raised external walls of concrete blocks, two overlapping planes and a constant shadow between them would not form on the facades, and sometimes a third intermediate plane. If the work and dinner tables were not fixed on opposite gables, it would not be necessary to have openings for lighting the horizontal planes in both gates. If the lighting allowed by the openings in the external gables was not direct and blinding, external prismatic volumes would not be required as individual combos to dim the light. If these volumes were not aligned with the tables, the horizontal planes could not be extended to the outside.


 

If the sixteen cross beams of the roof slab did not advance five and a half feet in balance on both sides, the fences could not be just window frames without any other kind of protection. If the beams of the main pavement slab did not advance only two and a half feet in balance on the back façade, against three meters and seventy centimeters in the main façade, there would be insufficient protection for the exterior staircase and the roof slab could not be interrupted. meter before touching the end of the beams. If there were not a longitudinal gable that would top off the ends of the roof beams on the back façade, the interior of the building could not be indirectly lit by the light passing between the beams and reflected in the gable. If the steel and glass frames were not modulated with the same one and seven centimeters from the spacing between transverse beams, they would not give continuity to the fixed glass panel positioned in the upper space between beams. If the frame frames were not supported only by the transverse roof beams, the sills and sills of both facades could not be completely unhindered and uninterrupted. If these frames were not only lateral, and if the frame was not just a squeeze on the outside of the sill, the transparency of the frame would not be divided only by the vertical lines. If the top panels were not slightly offset against the frames, there would be no room for natural ventilation. If the frames were not tiltable with sliding side guides, there would be no openings at both top and bottom. If the glass panels were not divided into two, the lower panel could not rise like a guillotine. If the dormitories and intimate environments were not distributed in the central range of the building, there would not be two opposing halls with continuous frames.


 

If the sills of steel and glass frames were not concreted in continuity with the lower slab, this would not form an inverted C rotated ninety degrees with respect to the C formed by the lateral gables and the cover slab. If the structure formed by the four thirty-five-centimeter square pillars, and by the two levels formed by two main longitudinal beams supporting sixteen transverse beams each, was not subverted by the fences and openings, that building would not exist.

 

 

Photos by © Nelson Kon

 

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Casa del Valle (2017) by David Guerra

Casa del Valle (2017) by David Guerra

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Casa del Valle (2017) by David Guerra located in Nova Lima, Brazil | The Hardt

 

A couple with two older children approached us having a generous place with an almost 360 ° view and the idea of building a modern and cozy house. The house should be a good place to entertain guests and friends, and at the same time maintain the landscape created by the garden. Therefore, the house was constructed with fluid spaces, with generous lighting and cross ventilation, which could be easily integrated or isolated to be used together or independently changing their integration and privacy as necessary. The landscape that is revealed on the horizon along with the garden around the house, and inside with a winter garden, make the house live in harmony with the landscape, allowing contemplation in all directions.


 

On the ground floor, there are the social, leisure and services areas of the house. As soon as you enter the house there are four pivoters open to a large room, from which you see the winter garden, the kitchen, the terraces, the living room and the stairs that lead to the second floor. The living room and the dining room are integrated with the terraces, the garden, the kitchen and the cinema, of which the last two can be closed. The kitchen as the heart of the house is open on all 4 sides, dining room, living room, terrace, and pool. The living room itself is integrated into an outdoor gourmet kitchen, a bathroom, game room, pool terrace, spa, sauna, and conservatory. Upon entering the house to the left we have a bathroom, with mosaics of blue tiles designed exclusively by the architect, the winter garden and the office, which is connected to the winter garden. The idea of integrating spaces brings the flow of a connected house that embraces nature. The stairs that lead to the second floor are built on the winter garden and gives the vertical and horizontal circulation a view of the house and the garden itself.

 

 

 


 

On the first floor, the rooms have a view of the horizon and have private terraces. The master bedroom has a very large view and a terrace. The closet is spacious and the bathroom has a small garden. A modern house that is deeply based on affective memories with stone, wood, brick, rustic cement and tiles, also uses color and landscaping to building a warm and cozy atmosphere, designed for relaxation and rest, but also to sustain good meetings and meetings. On the decorative side of things, the purpose of the material was to make the house a refuge that goes from the neglected to a place to open the eyes. The furniture designed by Brazilian and international designers, Tibetan rugs, linen curtains, paintings by local artists, objects brought from travel and a mixture of natural materials such as linen, leather and wood add richness to the decoration and look for a Brazilian identity.

 

© Jomar Bragança

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

House B + B (2014) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Renata Furlanetto + Architects

House B + B (2014) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Renata Furlanetto + Architects

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House B + B (2014) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Renata Furlanetto + Architects Gallery located in Brazil | The Hardt

 

House B + B (2014) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Renata Furlanetto + Architects Gallery located in Brazil. The arrival at Casa B + B – access to the social area – takes place through an architectural route, by an open ramp, located in the east portion of the construction. This space is protected laterally by concrete elements that create surprising light effects and end up acting as protection for weather inclement weather. It is an interstitial space between the protected interior of the building and the uncovered garden. The ramp, long and smooth, extends this transition between the interior and exterior, creating a present feeling of change of environment. This solution was widely used by Brazilian modernism, which consecrated the radical use of ramps as a form of vertical circulation by reaffirming Corbusian precepts on the architectural promenade. There is, purposely, a lack of definition about the nature of this space: internal or external?

 


The reference to modernism is also in the fence of leaked elements, consecrated from the 1930s in Brazil, as a solution to be reproduced in large scale, very suitable for the tropical climate since it allows shading without blocking the fresh wind. The social area of the house creates a sense of welcome and comfort, in an open space, without any structural interference to the layout of furniture. A sliding door of 3.5m allows the kitchen to be fully integrated into the living space of the dining room. The food preparation stand is in front of a window that faces the ramp, receiving the light built, filtered by the leaked elements. So the kitchen is made as an illuminated space and pleasant stay.

 


Unlike the usual, the rooms are on the first floor – in direct relation to the garden – and can also be accessed internally via a staircase connected to the upper room. Wood elements in the facade of this floor allow for control of the sun internally, and thus optimum thermal performance. The use of raw materials, such as apparent concrete and wood, lends a living aspect to the residence, constantly changing through time. The architecture of Casa B + B, therefore, sought to create a cozy, cozy space, an intimate house for both the daily life of the residents and receptions with friends in small social gatherings.
© Fernando Guerra | FG + SG


 

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