Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada

Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada

Asher 11:52 pm 11:58 pm

Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada | The Hardt

 

Petaluma House (2018) by Trevor McIvor Architect located in Toronto, Canada. The split-level house, with an open plan contemporary dwelling, is located in a rural subdivision near Whitby. Surrounded by very traditional custom homes, this gem stands out with its’ clean lines, prominent roof lines and an elegant composition. Designed for a retired professional, both the function and flexibility of space played a large role in the layout of spaces. A double-height glazed atrium filled with bamboo trees at the entrance brings natural daylight into the lower level entertainment and recreation rooms. An elegant, open-riser concrete and steel stair accentuates this space, nestled between the tall vegetation and an indoor waterfall. The main living space encompasses an open kitchen, with a dining room, and a screened porch which has the ability to merge with the interior or the outside of the dwelling. The slightly lowered living room is fully glazed and is connected with an ipe balcony.

 

 


 

Elements of whitewashed Douglas Fir cedars and soffits, mahogany, concrete and glass appear throughout the house, providing a natural, yet timeless palette. The client, a vintage car collector needed a room to store his gems in an integrated, and fully glazed attached car garage, which looks out onto the surrounding ravine. Petaluma House features finished concrete floors throughout with radiant-in-floor heating and cooling. The house has ample daylight and provides a comfortable atmosphere with natural ventilation. The master ensuite, a spa-like nook is located within the master bedroom; a modern approach with a very open, yet natural feeling. Keeping age in mind, a pneumatic see-through elevator shaft was integrated into the design, connecting all levels and adding an industrial touch.

 

Photography by Adrian Ozimek

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

Lake Cottage (2013) by UUfie

Lake Cottage (2013) by UUfie

Asher 3:07 am 11:21 am

Located in Kawartha Lakes, Canada, Lake Cottage (2013) by UUfie | The Hardt

 

Located in Kawartha Lakes, Canada, Lake Cottage (2013) by UUfie. Lake Cottage is a reinterpretation of living in a tree house where nature is an integral part of the building. In a forest of birch and spruce trees along the Kawartha Lakes, the cottage is designed as a two-story, multi-use space for a large family. The structure composed of a 7m high A-frame pitch roof covered in black steel and charred cedar siding. A deep cut in the building volume creates a cantilevered overhang for a protected outdoor terrace with mirrors to further give the illusion of the building containing the forest inside.

 

 


 

This mixture of feeling between nature and building continued into the interior. The main living space is design as a self-contained interior volume, while the peripheral rooms are treated as part of the building site. Fourteen openings into this grand living space reveal both inhabited spaces, skies, and trees, equally treated and further articulated with edges finishes of interior panel kept raw to show the inherent nature of materials used. This abstract nature of the interior spaces allows imagination to flow, and those spaces that could be identified as a domestic interior can suddenly become play spaces. A solid timber staircase leads to a loft which has the feeling of ascending into tree canopies as sunlight softy falls on a wall covered in fish-scaled shingle stained in light blue.

 

 

 


 

Using local materials and traditional construction methods, the cottage incorporated sustainable principles. The black wood cladding of exterior is a technique of charring cedar that acts as a natural agent against termite and fire. Thick walls and roof provide high insulation value, a central wood hearth provides heat and deep recessed windows and skylights provide natural ventilation and lighting. Lake Cottage is designed with interior and exterior spaces connected fluidly and repeat the experience of living within the branches of a tree.

 

© Naho Kubota

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

https://thehardt.com/architecture/house-for-a-photographer-kouichi-kimura-architects/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/house-in-eifukucho-2011-by-upsetters-architects/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/the-hill-house-2012-by-andrew-maynard-architects/

 

 

 


 

Williams Studio (2007) by gh3

Williams Studio (2007) by gh3

Asher 1:35 pm 8:48 pm

Williams Studio (2007) by gh3 located in Ennismore, Canada | The Hardt

 

Williams Studio (2007) by gh3 located in Ennismore, Canada. The 1,800 ft² (167 m²) is a photographer’s studio over a boathouse on Stony Lake is a re-imagination of the archetypal glass house in a landscape in the Canadian Shield. A continuation of thinking about this architectural ambition, the central concept of the house is reconceived through a contemporary lens of sustainability, program, site, and amenity. The compelling qualities of simple, open spaces; interior and exterior unity and material clarity are transformed to enhance the environmental and programmatic performance of the building, creating the architecture of both iconic resonance and innovative context-driven design. The program envisions a building as north–facing window: a photographer’s live/work studio and film location that is continuously bathed in diffuse and undiminished natural light. The transparent facade—a curtain wall glazed in low-iron glass—becomes the essential element in a photographic apparatus to produce images unobtainable in a conventional studio. The availability and fidelity of north–facing light in the double-height space provide the photographer with unparalleled natural illumination, while the clarity of the glazing transforms the site and surrounding vistas into a sublime, ever-changing backdrop.

 

 

 

 


 

The compact glass form sits at the water’s edge on a granite plinth whose matte black facade dematerializes to suspend the building, lantern-like, on the site. The granite’s thermal mass exploits the abundant solar input, eliminating the need for active systems on winter days, while the lakefront site allows the use of a deep-water exchange to heat and cool the building year-round through radiant slabs and recessed perimeter louvers at the floor and ceiling. Sliding panes in the glass skin—three meters wide at the ground floor, and one and a half meters wide on the mezzanine floor—allow the facade to become completely porous for natural ventilation, while an individually automated blind system, white roof, and deciduous hedgerow guard against excessive solar gain. The continuous blind system additionally serves as a second aesthetic skin, transforming the interior into an enclosed, intimate space, and the exterior into a gently reflective mirror of the surroundings.

 

 

 


 

Entry into the site is facilitated through a minimalist landscape that deploys endogenous materials while leaving the greatest portion of the site in its evocative, glacier-scoured state. A simple granite plinth serves as a threshold for the south-facing entrance, where solid program functions and vertical circulation are arranged in a narrow, efficient volume. From the outset, the goal was to accommodate the client’s needs within a small footprint. Domestic functions are integrated into a furniture-like mezzanine assembly suspended above the main space, where bedroom, bathroom, and closet are coextensive, and sliding fritted glass allows the whole to be concealed from the rest of the space. Throughout the upper and lower levels, interior partitions are clad with seamless white lacquered panels whose reflective qualities diffuse light into every part of the interior and create complex layered views through space. Set to be built in the spring of 2010, a lightweight aluminum curvilinear structure guarded by the low-iron glass will be constructed at level with the house. This freestanding structure will serve as an outdoor living platform.

 

© Larry Williams

 

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

Villa Vingt (2017) by Bourgeois / Lechasseur Architects

Villa Vingt (2017) by Bourgeois / Lechasseur Architects

Asher 1:50 pm 8:49 pm

Located in Lac-Beauport, Canada, Villa Vingt (2017) by Bourgeois / Lechasseur Architects

 

The Villa Vingt is anchored on a sloping site next to the ski resort Le Relais. The upper ground offers a magnificent view of the Laurentian hills and Lac-Beauport’s residential area. The project builds on the existing foundations of the client’s home in order to retain some acquired rights. The owners know the site’s qualities very well for having lived there many years. The project is inspired by the site and its accentuated relief. Level 1 acts as a base; it leans against the ground and opens up completely to the north. The upper floor seems to float above the concrete ground floor.

 

 


 

The living areas are cantilevered to create unique painting-like views. The maximized fenestration offers an unobstructed view of the mountain landscape. The roof overhangs stretch over the exterior decks. The access road below ensures the privacy of living spaces despite the generous fenestration. As we approach the house, we discover the richness of the white cedar ceiling covering the upper floor. This warm material expands beneath the roofs to emphasize the continuity between the interior and exterior. Volumes and materials unite to create a distinctive entrance. The sloped roof integrates the project into its built environment in a respectful way.

 


 

The geometry of the volume and the choice of window positions create surprising atmospheres that change according to interior functions. The dining room’s zenithal skylight offers an elegant view of the treetops and allows indirect light to play on the cedar laths. The central concrete wall gives the project verticality. Its rough finish shows the marks left by the formwork. The staircase next to it reveals its richness through the duality of the authentic materials surrounding it, namely concrete and steel. This home creates a strong presence in the panorama. The interaction between volumes and the main façade’s horizontality is reminiscent of some California villas.

 

© Adrien Williams

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

Yan House (2014) by D’Arcy Jones Architecture

Yan House (2014) by D’Arcy Jones Architecture

Asher 11:35 pm 12:52 am

Yan House (2014) by D’Arcy Jones Architecture, located in Vancouver, BC, Canada | The Hardt

 

Yan House (2014) by D’Arcy Jones Architecture, located in Vancouver, BC, Canada. This volumetric house wraps itself around a progression of four yards, fluctuating in size and introduction. Intended to accentuate a contemporary Canadian craftsmanship gathering, the patios additionally permit light and air profound into the house’s inside, while protecting the inhabitants from street clamor. Materials and completes stream inside-outside, making an emotional arrangement of spaces that shape the site’s delicate Vancouver light.

 

 

 

Photo Credit: Ema Peters

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

https://thehardt.com/architecture/house-in-paco-de-arcos-jorge-mealha/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/the-inverted-warehouse-townhouse-by-dean-wolf-architects/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/oliver-gustav-showroom-in-copenhagen/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/light-walls-house-ma-style-architects/

 

 


MENU
SEARCH
The Hardt

Pin It on Pinterest