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STAAB Residence by Chen + Suchart Studio

STAAB Residence by Chen + Suchart Studio situated in Scottsdale, Arizona | The Hardt

 

STAAB Residence by Chen + Suchart Studio situated in Scottsdale, Arizona. The 3,000 ft²  (279 m²) house presents itself as a series of sand-blasted 12-8-16 masonry walls upon which a stainless steel and glass-clad volume float. The context for this site consists of larger homes on one-acre lots.  Aesthetically, the neighboring houses’ architectural language is more often than not, associated with speculative developer trends and styles, rather than an integrated understanding of the site, the views, and other opportunities.  As a result, the project required a strategy which would edit out the immediate context of this neighborhood while focusing on distant views of the McDowell Mountains to the north and the valley to the south and southwest.  The project also seeks to create a protected courtyard space for the backyard and pool area as an immediate focus for the lower level of the house in contrast to the second level taking advantage of the more distant views.

 


 

The masonry walls are solid with minimal openings in order to edit out the existing context of the neighborhood while also ensuring privacy.  In specific locations associated with the entry courtyard and the outdoor space for a guest bedroom, the masonry gradually opens up it’s coursing to allow for light and air.  A separate weathering steel plate clad volume to the south houses the garage while also providing privacy to the pool area and backyard from a neighboring house.

 


 

Entering into the residence takes one along a monolithic field of desert grasses and through a portal created by two masonry walls and the volume above.  One is ushered into a garden space while being focused on the views north of the McDowell Mountains.  This garden space offers an area of repose in order to mentally dispose of the immediate context of the neighborhood before entering the house.  Upon entering, the main living space is configured as one uninterrupted volume of space.  These public spaces open immediately to the pool and backyard living areas by means of sliding glass panels that fully disappear.  The entry garden is maintained as part of the living space’s experience by the stair being as visibly open as possible while maintaining definition to the entry area.

 

 


 

An adjacent series of spaces in between two masonry walls house two guest bedrooms each having their own distinctive experiences of the site.  One is focused on the immediate backyard area while the other is focused on the more distant view to the north.  One larger bathroom space separates these two bedrooms while the water closet, walk-in shower, and bath configuration also maintain a focused view to the north.  The master suite and office are located in the volume above.  A panoramic view of the McDowell Mountains to the north is offered in each of these second level spaces.  The master bedroom, dressing, and bathroom spaces are configured as one large suite in order to provide an open relationship while emphasizing the panoramic quality of the view to the north.  The roof overhangs located on the south and west sides mitigate the solar heat gain while also providing a patio space overlooking the courtyard space. The upstairs volume is clad in 11 gage 4’ wide stainless steel plate cut to length directly from the coil, and 1” insulated glass panels with a silver colored high-performance thermal coating.  The strategy of the cladding for this volume was to create an envelope that would best absorb the environment and allow for a varying perception of color and finish throughout the day.

 

Photos by © Matt Winquist

 

 


 

 

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The Hardt Vila Romana Residence by MMBB Arquitetos 5 STAAB Residence by Chen + Suchart Studio Architecture Glass Minimal Nature patterns View  USA pool Matt Winquist lighting desert Chen + Suchart Studio cantilevered Arizona   Image of Vila Romana Residence by MMBB Arquitetos 5

Vila Romana Residence (2006) by MMBB Arquitetos

Located in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Vila Romana Residence (2006) by MMBB Arquitetos | The Hardt

 

Located in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Vila Romana Residence (2006) by MMBB Arquitetos. The design of the Espirito Santo Residence is derived from the twin imperatives of topography and usage. It is situated on a corner plot with views of the town’s principal valley, with a drop of 10 meters from one side of the plot to the other. The first question to be tackled was that of creating an artificial terrain that would allow for easy transit around the external areas and their use for day-to-day activities. The landscaping was determined by the creation of these areas. The second question was that of the residence’s dual usage. The building houses not only the residence but also the working studio of the artist owner. The strategy adopted was to divide the building into two autonomous blocks. In contact with the terrain is the studio block, partly embedded in the hill and illuminated only by an overhead opening. Its interior is divided by a series of walls which serve as supports for the works to be created there.

 


 

Suspended above the terrain is the block containing the residency itself, open to the views that surround it. Its internal layout is designed to facilitate integration and fluidity between separate sectors for living, sleeping, cooking and the service area. Between the two blocks, on the slab that forms the roof of the studio, a large veranda has been created, partly in shadow. Another space, uncovered, occupies the slab over the residential block, increasing the total external ground area.

 

 


 

The suspended block is supported on only four points, with prominent overhangs. The two solid slabs that support it are constructed from exposed prestressed concrete. A further layer of concrete conceals the steel reinforcing elements. This concrete and the window system form the façade of the building. The concrete slabs, once polished, from the floor of the interior environment, with no need for additional surfacing. Conical niches in the concrete allow for the direct installation of lighting, with no need for additional fixtures. It is this succession of constructional features that define the project as a whole.

 

© Nelson Kon

 

 


 

 

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https://thehardt.com/architecture/residence-gardens-drucker-architects-associates/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/casa-hazp-2011-frederico-zanelato-arquitetos/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/house-in-butanta-by-paulo-mendes-da-rocha-and-joao-de-gennaro/

 

 


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Located in Caniçada, Portugal, House in Gerês by Correia/Ragazzi Arquitectos

Located in Caniçada, Portugal, House in Gerês by Correia/Ragazzi Arquitectos | The Hardt

 

Located in Caniçada, Portugal, House in Gerês (2003) by Correia/Ragazzi Arquitectos. The project of this house foresees both to reconstruct and augment a ruin into a weekend retreat at a plot with extraordinary morphological characteristics, within Cavado River and its tributary. The plot, of 1.1 acres (4,060 m²) is located in a protected natural area and has for conditions a concrete construction and the preservation of all trees. The constructive capacity was given by the existing ruin. Since the first visit to the site, it was clear we were dealing with a delicate project. The project placement on the plot was essential given that the surroundings were the main reference for the construction.

 

 


 

Having practiced water-ski for 20 years, the river grounds the weekend house for the clients. For them, the exceptional outlook one enjoys should be an element of the house; for us, architects, should be an evident inside space value, but also, the opposite concern was relevant – the house could only act as a significant element on the landscape. Having identified the site, a pragmatic analysis of the circumstances was in order: the demands of the program were a house for a couple and child, a visitor’s suit preferably dislocated from the house as also should be the storehouse for the water-ski activities holding a shower, bathroom and storage area. The area of the house, inevitably small, was specified by the reduced dimension of the pre-existent ruin. Thus, the first sketches of the solution appear in its dependence… Meanwhile, the fundamental decision revealed itself through the house orientation. Its final location on site, at right angles to the slop, seeks for a better relationship with the plot and the platform where it “lays”, avoiding all trees and damage to the outside area. The weightless intervention enhanced by the overhanging part that shoots off the riverbank cliff maximizes the transparent appearance of the river reducing land occupancy. As a half-buried house in its relation to the main access it appears diminished; on the other hand, from the river, it appears as a glass frame dissimulated on the vegetation. The relation established by the house and ruin defines both the access and the scale of the intervention, transforming the ruin into a constant presence from the inside of the house such as any other landscape element. The concrete plasticity in relation with the luxuriant flora was determinant, therefore the careful concrete cast drawing. This concrete volume with the accessible roof was entirely covered with birch on the inside and has grey self-leveled pavement.

 

 

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