House RP – Marcelo Rios (2013) by Gonzalo Mardones V Arquitectos

House RP – Marcelo Rios (2013) by Gonzalo Mardones V Arquitectos

House RP – Marcelo Rios (2013) by Gonzalo Mardones V Arquitectos located in Barnechea, Chile | The Hardt

 

House RP – Marcelo Rios (2013) by Gonzalo Mardones V Arquitectos located in Barnechea, Chile. The house for Marcelo Rios and his family comes from the order of this former tennis player, also former World No. 1. It’s located in Valle Escondido, a place enclosed on the foothills of Santiago de Chile within a stunning natural environment and a privileged view to the hills and the golf course. The house places at middle levels, adapting to the slope. Also, it’s half-buried in order to appreciate and see the magnificent natural scenery from the access road. The roofs, themes from the distance, were enabled as an expanding large terrace: a place to stay, to enjoy the views, the environment and sunshine. The continuous roofs to the terrace surface were designed with natural vegetation and grass, but Marcelo, like every time he visited Wimbledon says that “The grass is for cows” so we decided to implement a roof with synthetic grass. The artificial grass was installed on rafters, which allowed generating an air bed that protects the cover from direct sunlight, preventing from overheating and affecting the air conditioning inside the house.

 

 


 

The entrance hall acts like a kneecap that relates and distributes the different levels generating inside a sum of continuous merged spaces seeking the views to the garden, the golf course, the remote landscape, and natural light. The house was designed with two opposite faces: one closed to the street with walls containing internal circulations bathed in zenithal lighting and courtyards, and a second face completely open to the terraces, the garden and views protected from the sunlight with wide eaves and beams. We chose to use just one material, the exposed concrete, adding titanium dioxide to the concrete in order to whiten it. Recently, nanotechnology studies have shown that titanium dioxide added to the concrete helps to eliminate toxic gases produced by cars as trees do.  (Although that was not our aim whitening the concrete, we believe that if it’s true, is good news). Every wall, opening, window, window sill, etc, has been faceted with a 12 cm module obtained from the measure of the phenolic sheets.

 


 

The use of the subsoil, what we call the sixth façade, is present in rooms that open, ventilate and illuminate through courtyards and the extension of the foundation to the terrace. The subsoil houses a games room, a trophy room, and a cinema. The whole interior is white in order to enhance the brightness in the house. As the white color makes the light bounce, this is strained and controlled through courtyards and side zenithal openings. The floor and skirting boards help with the idea of white in the interior. For that, bone color ceramic tiles in format 120 x 60 cm have been used. Large windows are made of aluminum, helping with the monochromatic white image of the house. The garden was designed as a raised platform over the golf course, where it is possible to see it but not to be exposed to it.

 

© Nico Saieh

 


 

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Casa O by 01Arq.

Casa O by 01Arq.

Located in Colina, Chile, Casa O by 01Arq. | The Hardt

 

Located in Colina, Chile, Casa O by 01Arq. On the first floor, the house is buried creating a retaining wall to the south and west. This operation allows locating the parking lots next to a wide ramp that connects the street with the main entrance of the house. The first floor of the 3,500 ft² (325 m²) house contains maximum flexibility in living spaces; they can make up a single space when the sliding wall that separates the kitchen with the dining room is open. During the summer the glass facades are hidden behind concrete walls, transforming the living and dining rooms in a large covered terrace that joins the outdoor pool and garden.

 

 

Photos @ Aryeh Kornfeld / @ Mauricio Fuertes

 


 

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Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz

Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz

Located in Zapallar, Chile, Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz | The Hardt

 

Located in Zapallar, Chile, Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz. The house is inserted in the terrain taking advantage of the panoramic views and topography. A perpendicular slope towards the sights and the main volume define two levels which are linked by a single vertical element, the black-edged stone chimney that goes through both floors. Access at the top level leads to major facilities: living, dining, kitchen areas and master bedroom, accompanied with two wind protected terraces and a balcony running across all its length, defined by the recessed glass windows in its west view. The lower level contains five bedrooms and a family room.

 

 


 

The immediate surroundings and the panoramic views towards the ocean’s horizon, determine the main building programme to open its body parallel to this gifted sight, while all circulations take place around the building’s forest sides. The said situation defines two distinctly different sides; it comes forward with a fully glazed facade that opens entirely to the sea views when the back entrance is defined with a sealed facade, worked out with timber sleepers interspersed with glass, giving partial views of the woods.

 

 

 

© Sergio Pirrone

 

 


 

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House in Lo Curro (2009) by Schmidt Arquitectos Asociados

House in Lo Curro (2009) by Schmidt Arquitectos Asociados

House in Lo Curro (2009) by Schmidt Arquitectos Asociados located in Santiago, Chile | The Hardt

 

House in Lo Curro (2009) by Schmidt Arquitectos Asociados located in Santiago, Chile. The house is Located in Lo Curro hill in the capital city of Chile, Santiago. The site, long and with a gentle slope, is covered with a forest of eucalyptus trees planted 30 years ago and it is crossed by an irrigation canal. It faces north and has a front view of the southern slope of the hill with vegetation, and a side view of the area east towards the city and the Cordillera de los Andes. This site brings together the best of central Chile, in addition to being just minutes from highways and therefore connected to anywhere. The commission came out of conversations with our customers about the formality and programmatic live in the city and the freedom of households out of it, this freedom was something they did not want to lose. The client wanted, “a modern but cozy house,” We understood this as a comment to contemporary architecture, as boxes placed on the ground, turning the inhabitants into spectators of nature.


 

Organized by a glazed central corridor, the proposal extended as a house on the ground that invites people to explore it and enjoy it. This idea was emphasized in order to articulate the house with the landscape project. The program will then be distributed freely along this route, from an atelier room on the outside, through the public areas to the bedrooms. In this sense, the rooms take advantage of the slope and with through this set their spatial and hierarchical condition. To make the house comfortable, the preferred materiality privileged materials and natural textures such as stone walls and wood floors. Softcover coated waters slate tiles are structured on laminated beams made of Chilean native timber Coihue and the slabs were left at the light to add more complexity and pace to the ceiling.

 

 


 

To dilute the boundary between inside and outside, the windows are recessed in the floor and beams, sliding windows and doors are the only elements with frames and the stone walls of the garden terraces are introduced into the interior to reinforce the spatial continuity. The large window of the living room opens completely integrating the terrace and pool inside the house or vice versa.Finally, the existing irrigation canal has been integrated into the house and landscape design, creating tiered lakes accompanying the tour, reflecting the environment, providing sound and moisture to the air. This channel ends in a 60 ft (18 meters) long swimming pool which resembles one more pond of the system.

 

 

© Martín Schmidt R.

 

 


 

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Innovation Center UC – Anacleto Angelini (2014) by Alejandro Aravena | ELEMENTAL

Innovation Center UC – Anacleto Angelini (2014) by Alejandro Aravena | ELEMENTAL

Located in Vicuña Mackenna, Macul, Santiago, Chile, Innovation Center UC – Anacleto Angelini (2014) by Alejandro Aravena | ELEMENTAL | The Hardt

 

Located in Vicuña Mackenna, Macul, Santiago, Chile, Innovation Center UC – Anacleto Angelini (2014) by Alejandro Aravena | ELEMENTAL. In 2011, Angelini Group decided to donate the necessary funds to create a center where companies, businesses and more in general, demand, could converge with researchers and state of the art university knowledge creation. The aim was to contribute to the process of transferring know-how, identifying business opportunities, adding value to existing resources or registering patents in order to improve the country’s competitiveness and consequently its development. The Universidad Católica de Chile would host such a center and allocated a site in its San Joaquin Campus.

 

 

 

 


 

Our proposal to accommodate such goals was to design a building in which at least 4 forms of work could be verified: a matrix of formal and informal work crossed by individual and collective ways of encountering people. In addition to that, we thought that face to face contact is unbeatable when one wants to create knowledge, so we multiplied throughout the building the places where people could meet: from the elevator’s lobby with a bench where to sit if you happen to run into somebody that has interesting information to share, to a transparent atrium where you can sneak into what others are doing while circulating vertically, to elevated squares throughout the entire height of the building.The reversal of the typical office space floor plan (replacing the opaque core with transparent curtain wall glass perimeter by an open core with the mass strategically opened in the perimeter) responded not only to functional reasons but to the environmental performance and character of the building as well.

 


This building had to respond to the client’s expectation of having an innovation center with a “contemporary look”, but the uncritical search for contemporariness has populated Santiago with glass towers that due to the desert climatic local condition have a serious greenhouse effect in interiors. Such towers spend a huge amount of energy in air conditioning. The way to avoid undesired heat gains is not rocket science; it is enough to place the mass of the building on the perimeter, have recessed glasses to prevent direct sun radiation and allow for cross ventilation. By doing so we went from 120 kW/m²)/year (the consumption of a typical glass tower in Santiago) to 45kW/m2/year. Such an opaque facade was not only energetically efficient but also helped to dim the extremely strong light that normally forces to protect interior working spaces with curtains and blinds transforming in fact, the theoretical initial transparency into a mere rhetoric. In that sense, the response to the context was nothing but the rigorous use of common sense.

 


 

On the other hand, we thought that the biggest threat to an innovation center is obsolescence; functional and stylistic obsolescence. So the rejection of the glass facade was not only due to the professional responsibility of avoiding an extremely poor environmental performance, but also a search for a design that could stand the test of time. From a functional point of view, we thought the best way to fight obsolescence was to design the building as if it was an infrastructure more than architecture. A clear, direct and even tough form is, in the end, the most flexible way to allow for continuous change and renewal. From a stylistic point of view, we thought of using a rather strict geometry and strong monolithic materiality as a way to replace trendiness by timelessness.

 

Don’t forget the drone footage of this monolithic insanity below.

 

© Nico Saieh

 

 

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