17BR-House by ONG&ONG 

17BR-House by ONG&ONG 

17BR-House by ONG&ONG located in Singapore | The Hardt

 

17BR-House by ONG&ONG located in Singapore. The 17BR-House is a Peranakan shophouse originally built between 1900 and 1940. The homeowners wanted to build a warm family home that would preserve the shophouse’s historical character and reverse the drastic alterations done during its previous incarnation as an office space. In reinstating 17BR-House as a residence, an inner courtyard was created on the first floor, allowing sunlight and air to flow freely into and throughout the house. The installation of a green wall, as well as the covering of the floor entirely in carpet grass, transforms the courtyard into a quaint indoor garden. This space forms the visual focus for the first floor; with the absence of partition walls, there is a seamless visual transition from the kitchen at the back of the building to the living area at the front, allowing the family-oriented homeowner to interact with his children while indulging in culinary exploits in the kitchen.

 

 


 

A dramatic spiral staircase spanning all three levels maximizes vertical circulation while skylights in the jack roof directly above the staircase provide natural illumination. Timber beams installed in the ceiling of the first floor and the roof adds an old world charm to the home. The second floor holds two bedrooms; both share a bathroom, a long corridor lined with bookshelves and storage space, as well as equally enjoyable views, one of the traditional façade and the other of the green wall in the courtyard. The top floor houses the master bedroom and a separate bathroom visually connected to the bedroom via a long slab of limestone that serves as the top counter of the bathroom’s vanity and continues onward into the corridor, forming a functional desk area amidst a bookshelf-lined wall. The skylight in the master bathroom illuminates both the bathroom and the balcony on the second floor with natural daylight.

 

 

 


 

The shophouse’s rear comprises a kitchen, the service quarters as well as a 23 foot (7-meter) long swimming pool, with traditional glazed floor tiles and a replica spiral staircase at the back reminiscent of the shophouse’s early days. The façade’s restoration, with the reversion to a single point Pagar door, the reinstatement of the traditional, taller windows on the second floor, and the use of shiny enamel-finished dado tiles, completes the project that goes beyond the creation of a perfect, modern family home to a preservation of an invaluable cultural heritage. The shophouse had been in a bad state, having been stripped of its historical characteristics and renovated for office use. With much support from the client, the architects made a conscious effort to bring these traditional elements back while also reinstating the shophouse to residential use. Considering the scale of the restorative work required the final product is both a perfect home for the modern family as well as a fitting tribute to the shophouse’s history.

 

 

Photography by Aaron Pocock

 


 

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Kirchplatz Office + Residence (2012) by Oppenheim Architecture + Design

Kirchplatz Office + Residence (2012) by Oppenheim Architecture + Design

Located in Muttenz, Switzerland, Kirchplatz Office + Residence (2012) by Oppenheim Architecture + Design | The Hardt 

 

Located in Muttenz, Switzerland, Kirchplatz Office + Residence (2012) by my dear friend Chad Oppenheim of Oppenheim Architecture + Design. The design of this adaptive re-use project was born initially out of a design competition initiated by the City of Muttenz/Basel. The design was based on the renovation of a historic farmhouse situated within the historic central core of the city. The original farmhouse was constructed in 1743.  Today the converted farmhouse serves as an office for an architectural design company, provides community meeting space, and serves as a compelling link to a new, adjacent private residence. The new design aimed to provide a fresh interpretation to the existing traditional features of the historic farmhouse building and its interior. This is achieved by creating new openings for natural daylight and by using a crisp white finish in the interiors, which juxtapose against the texture of the old wood and through the way in which the spaces open up, overlap, and merge together with one another.

 

 


 

The sustainability considerations included maintaining an energy-efficient building through the use of current MINERGIE (energy efficiency) construction standards, solar roof panels, a sustainable choice of materials such as reclaimed wood used for the facade, and the restoration of existing architectural elements where possible. The project also included the design of a new single-family house adjacent to the adaptively re-used historic farmhouse that was converted into the office. This elegant contemporary residential structure juxtaposes with the historic building. The new and old share commonalities of materials and colors, yet have distinctly different expressions with the interplay of modern and historic delighting the senses. The 3-floor house is organized with the master bedroom and guest bedroom on the top floor; the kitchen, dining and living spaces on the ground level; and the children’s bedrooms below ground with a ramped outdoor backyard terrace leading up to the ground level.

 

 

 

© Borje Müller

 


 

 

 

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Bunker Industrial Apartment in Hamburg (2017) by Thomas Schacht

Bunker Industrial Apartment in Hamburg (2017) by Thomas Schacht

Bunker Industrial Apartment in Hamburg (2017) by Thomas Schacht located in Hamburg, Germany

Bunker Industrial Apartment in Hamburg (2017) by Thomas Schacht located in Hamburg, Germany. The Bunker Apartment is your safe nest when you are working in Hamburg for a shorter or longer period of time. It is your home or your hideaway for a long weekend. In a period of 3 years from 2014 to 2017, the original Bunker has been rebuilt and renovated to become a unique location close to the city center of Hamburg. The build is a statement in itself bearing witness of another time and a precise purpose of protecting people from what was happening around it.

 

 

 


In this case, function dictated form meaning solid concrete and open spaces. We respect that and have left the raw walls as they were made by the hand of workers in 1939. Big windows has been cut in the whole south- south and east facing walls letting in bright light and a wonderful view over the city. The Bunker apartment offers the highest standard possible in terms of interior design and furniture. It is well conceived in every detail which not only brings joy and but also makes it easy to use. In other words; You will feel comfortable and at home from the moment you enter.”
Photo: Thomas Schacht

 

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Tribeca Loft (2013) by Andrew Franz Architect

Tribeca Loft (2013) by Andrew Franz Architect

Tribeca Loft (2013) by Andrew Franz Architect located in a former warehouse in New York neighborhood of Tribeca | The Hardt

 

Tribeca Loft (2013) by Andrew Franz Architect located in a former warehouse in New York neighborhood of Tribeca. In Manhattan’s landmarked Tribeca North area, the 3,000-ft² (278 m²) top floor and roof of an 1884 caviar warehouse are reconceived as a residence with large open entertaining zones and a fluid connection with the outdoor environment. The residence is transformed by a relocated mezzanine where a sunken interior court with a retractable glass roof connects to the planted green roof garden above. This gesture of subtracting volume from the interior brings the outdoors into the primary living zones. The roof, peeled back, showers the spaces with natural light. When open, ample air flow enters what was once a poorly ventilated and dark loft. By night, the court acts as an internal lantern illuminating the loft below.

 

 


 

Embracing the building’s industrial past, a visual discourse between new and old is devised through insertions of modern materials along with restored or reclaimed materials from the loft. A custom steel stair repurposes timbers from the old roof joists as treads and landings. The multiple level residence is unified by a walnut fascia that serves as a conceptual datum. To add to its sustainable nature, new and energy-efficient mechanical systems and appliances are employed. The project reclaims and reuses loft materials while bringing in new, locally sourced products including the appliances, retractable glass roof, architectural metal work, and cabinetry. The new roof terrace utilizes reclaimed bluestone pavers and a majority of native plant species that require little water while insulating the environment below.

 

© Albert Vecerka/Esto

 


 

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Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner

Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner

Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner located in Downtown Los Angeles, CA. USA | The Hardt

 

Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner located in Downtown Los Angeles, CA. USA. The Arts District Loft is an alteration of a 2,000 ft² (186 m²) condominium loft in one of my favorite buildings in the arts district, or downtown LA for that matter, the Toy Factory Lofts, a 1924 warehouse located in the Arts District in Downtown Los Angeles. The alteration included the removal of existing partitions to combine two bedrooms into one master suite; the installation of casework to reconfigure the living room and bedroom; and the renovation of the kitchen, bathroom, and powder room. To create a more intimate living space also suitable for entertaining, we aimed to create distinct areas within the existing open floor plan. In the main space, we raised a 20-foot by 20-foot (6 x 6 meter) area 18 inches (46 cm) in the southeast corner to delineate a living room area and optimize the south- and east-facing windows. The resulting floor-to-ceiling windows provide a visual connection to the street that previously did not exist.

 

 


 

Separating the living room from the adjacent master suite is a custom bookcase with three bays that rotate 90 degrees. When left open, the bookcase lets in natural light from the living room windows, while the resulting ledge doubles as flexible seating for the master suite sitting area. Just north of the bedroom, we converted the area surrounding an existing concrete column into a study and coat closet. Against the industrial backdrop of the existing concrete floor and exposed structural concrete of the ceiling are inviting, modern interiors. We worked with an assortment of woods, textures, and metal finishes to visually warm and soften the space. A color palette of primarily warm gray tones and black complement the gray herringbone pattern oak floor and bold black custom casework built by our wood shop. The result is a comfortable home well-suited for entertaining – simple yet sophisticated.

 

© Jessie Webster

 


 

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