17BR-House by ONG&ONG 

17BR-House by ONG&ONG 

17BR-House by ONG&ONG located in Singapore | The Hardt

 

17BR-House by ONG&ONG located in Singapore. The 17BR-House is a Peranakan shophouse originally built between 1900 and 1940. The homeowners wanted to build a warm family home that would preserve the shophouse’s historical character and reverse the drastic alterations done during its previous incarnation as an office space. In reinstating 17BR-House as a residence, an inner courtyard was created on the first floor, allowing sunlight and air to flow freely into and throughout the house. The installation of a green wall, as well as the covering of the floor entirely in carpet grass, transforms the courtyard into a quaint indoor garden. This space forms the visual focus for the first floor; with the absence of partition walls, there is a seamless visual transition from the kitchen at the back of the building to the living area at the front, allowing the family-oriented homeowner to interact with his children while indulging in culinary exploits in the kitchen.

 

 


 

A dramatic spiral staircase spanning all three levels maximizes vertical circulation while skylights in the jack roof directly above the staircase provide natural illumination. Timber beams installed in the ceiling of the first floor and the roof adds an old world charm to the home. The second floor holds two bedrooms; both share a bathroom, a long corridor lined with bookshelves and storage space, as well as equally enjoyable views, one of the traditional façade and the other of the green wall in the courtyard. The top floor houses the master bedroom and a separate bathroom visually connected to the bedroom via a long slab of limestone that serves as the top counter of the bathroom’s vanity and continues onward into the corridor, forming a functional desk area amidst a bookshelf-lined wall. The skylight in the master bathroom illuminates both the bathroom and the balcony on the second floor with natural daylight.

 

 

 


 

The shophouse’s rear comprises a kitchen, the service quarters as well as a 23 foot (7-meter) long swimming pool, with traditional glazed floor tiles and a replica spiral staircase at the back reminiscent of the shophouse’s early days. The façade’s restoration, with the reversion to a single point Pagar door, the reinstatement of the traditional, taller windows on the second floor, and the use of shiny enamel-finished dado tiles, completes the project that goes beyond the creation of a perfect, modern family home to a preservation of an invaluable cultural heritage. The shophouse had been in a bad state, having been stripped of its historical characteristics and renovated for office use. With much support from the client, the architects made a conscious effort to bring these traditional elements back while also reinstating the shophouse to residential use. Considering the scale of the restorative work required the final product is both a perfect home for the modern family as well as a fitting tribute to the shophouse’s history.

 

 

Photography by Aaron Pocock

 


 

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The Lodhi + Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects

The Lodhi + Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects

The Lodhi+ Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects located in New Delhi, India | The Hardt

 

 

 

 


 

The Lodhi + Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects located in New Delhi, India. The luxury hotel won the Commendation for International Architecture at the AIA’s 2010 National Architecture Awards. On the streets of New Delhi’s Lodhi quarter, the Hotel Aman New Delhi explodes onto the pious and solemn outskirts of the city, adjacent to the Nizam Uddin mausoleum. Sprung from the imagination of the celebrated Australian architect, Kerry Hill, this luxury establishment is daringly trendy in style, plunging guests into a delicately contemporary universe. The design furniture and sculpted Rajasthan stone walls make the Aman New Delhi a worthy representative of the prestigious Amanresorts hotel group. The 31 rooms and 8 suites spread over 9 floors contain jaalis (perforated stone with geometric patterns) and open onto the hustle and bustle of the Indian capital. But for perfect moments of relaxation, there’s nothing better than taking advantage of the wide range of massages and treatments available at the hotel’s spa.

 


 

 

The stunning silhouette of Aman New Delhi is located not far from the mausoleum of Nizam Ud Din, an Indian Sufi master. Although the neighborhood is as described in the Blue Guide as a “survivor of the medieval world marked with poetry and fervor”, the hotel is a perfect example of a contemporary and daring contrast, in line with all the other contradictions that one finds in the Indian capital. Owned by the Aman Resorts group, the hotel’s 31 rooms and 8 suites are on 9 levels with a magnificent view of Lodhi quarter and its monuments. The sophisticated, modern and elegant interiors are the work of Australian architect, Kerry Hill who created an intelligent blend of traditional Indian architecture and contemporary furniture. Sculpted walls from Rajasthan, windows and partitions pierced with jaalis or embroidery type stone decorations and dark wood furniture give the rooms a discreet luxury, conforming to the Aman group’s policy of hospitality.

 

 

 


 

Amanresorts and The Lodhi have created a six-night itinerary to experience the vibrant culture of India, including two night stays at The Lodhi and Amanbagh and Aman-i-Khas, in Rajasthan. It includes daily breakfast for two and one activity per resort per stay. Visit India’s cosmopolitan capital New Delhi. Located in Lutyen’s Delhi, just minutes from Rashtrapati Bhavan, the peaceful Lodhi gardens, Humayun’s Tomb and many other iconic sites, The Lodhi provides a tranquil heart for one of the world’s most colorful and cosmopolitan capital cities. Offering essential respite on a six-acre property, this city-based retreat is an elegant haven of leisure facilities including The Lodhi Spa, Gym, Pilates studio, Tennis and Squash courts and a variety of restaurants. All Lodhi rooms and suites feature private plunge pools. The Lodhi, formerly the Aman New Delhi, is the ideal base from which to experience the city’s wealth of historical, cultural and contemporary attractions.

 


 

As a haven of serenity in the midst of the urban hustle and bustle of New Delhi, the Aman spirit, a word derived from the Sanskrit word for peace, prevails throughout the hotel. In addition, it’s hard to resist the traditional Indian treatments offered by the hotel’s spa.

 


 

 

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2G House by S-AR Stación-Arquitectura

2G House by S-AR Stación-Arquitectura

2G House by S-AR Stación-Arquitectura situated in San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico | The Hardt

 

2G House by S-AR Stación-Arquitectura situated in San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico. The house was designed as a sanctuary from the surrounding urban environment, as well as a series of memorable architectural spaces with the people that live in them at their conceptual core. Casa 2G creates sensory experiences and moments that enrich its inhabitant’s daily lives, thanks in part to its sparse materiality and handmade features, which pay tribute to the artisan work of local craftsmen. The nature of this space contrasts with false ideas of human progress in a world dominated by appearances and trends. The house is a reinforced concrete monolith that has been perforated to create the interior space which is then defined with a glass membrane to emphasize the continuity of the material in floors, walls and slabs and its quality to be gradually transformed by the movement of the light and the shadows that occurs both inside and outside of the house during the course of the day.

 


 

Proposed as a basic house, the project is a simple rectangular volume with a courtyard that divides the social from the private area. Located in a residential area, the volume starts few meters behind the line of the street creating a courtyard for pedestrian and vehicular access. A concrete wall with a door is to simplify the design of the facade of the house, making it as basic as possible. However, this lack of openings to the street, contrasts with a wide open interior space that visually connects the whole social area with the central patio, the backyard and the Sierra Madre Mountains filling the interior spaces with light and natural ventilation and establishing a strong dialogue with the landscape.

 


 

The private rooms are protected by a segmented wall that allows privacy; also every private room has a private patio to bring lighting and ventilation. The social area is a continuous sequence of kitchen, dining room, lounge and a large terrace that connects to the rear garden. Doors, windows, metalwork, and construction system are the most basic possible. The materials are left in a raw and natural way. Many of them have been done on site using materials and local labor with the intention of rescuing traditional constructive systems and jobs that have been displaced by a market of prefabricated materials, which generates low local employment and architecture based on repetition and mass.

 

 

 


 

Manual opening systems for windows and skylights and doors were designed especially for the project, developed by working closely with experienced local carpenters and blacksmiths. The architecture of the house invites the users to be part of their material structure. The use of the house generates a direct experience with materials, tactile sensations and a different consciousness of the elements that are part of the house in times of extreme lack of contact between people and objects and also between people and architecture. Thus 90% of the components of the house have been made by local labor and have only used the lowest number of industrial materials to preserve the essential idea of the project.

 


 

Structurally, the whole volume made of reinforced concrete made in site (walls, slabs, and inverted beams) floats on a platform that helps to provide insulation for the interior space, also the orientation of the house ensures the protection of the solar incidence using the existing trees on the site which bring shade to the roof of the house and also using higher volumes of neighboring houses. The house is a reinforced concrete monolith that has been perforated to create the interior space which is then defined with a glass membrane to emphasize the continuity of the material in floors, walls and slabs and its quality to be gradually transformed by the movement of the light and the shadows that occurs both inside and outside of the house during the course of the day.

 

 

Photos by Ana Cecilia Garza Villarrea

 


 

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Villa Kaplansky by B-Architecten

Villa Kaplansky by B-Architecten

Located in Wilrijk, Belgium Villa Kaplansky by B-architecten | The Hardt

 

Located in Wilrijk, Belgium Villa Kaplansky by B-architecten. This house, designed by the architect Nachman Kaplansky in 1934, was dramatically rebuilt in 1962. The openings for the windows were changed and nothing remained of the original interior. During the renovation, the original volume was restored and the villa was given back its grandeur. The original steel window frames could be reconstructed thanks to the original building schemes. The interior’s design is new with materials reminiscent of the thirties, such as travertine and terrazzo. The winding stairs and the fireplace are the eye catchers in the living room. In the back of the garden, there is a pond and a modern-day concrete pavilion with a fireplace.

 

 

 

 

Status completed – 2011
Location Wilrijk
Client private
Team Sarai Bervoets, Nele Boussemaere, Christophe Combes, Evert Crols, Ilse De Ridder, Dirk Engelen, Christoph Fischer, Sven Grooten

 

 

 

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Villa-Safadasht (2016) by Kamran Heirati Architects

Villa-Safadasht (2016) by Kamran Heirati Architects

Located in Tehran, IranVilla-Safadasht (2016) by Kamran Heirati Architects | The Hardt

 

Located in Tehran, IranVilla-Safadasht (2016) by Kamran Heirati Architects. This project seeks to develop one of the essential structures of Persian architecture, The” Garden”. In a Persian garden, architecture seeks to see the building and the site as a whole and unique entity. This project also intends to identify itself as a passage or a frame to emphasize on the presence of the site not only as the exterior but also as a stream which flows around and inside the building. The axes of the building and the site intersect at the center or the “heart” of the building. The heart in this scenario is a space where the exploration of the building starts and ends.

 

 

 

Photos © Abdolreza Bassiri

 

 


Interested in similar inspirational projects? Get at the links below for more. Keep your momentum going.

 


 

S House By Nicolas Schuybroek

S House By Nicolas Schuybroek

S House By Nicolas Schuybroek located in Cap d’Antibes, Côte d’Azur, France | The Hardt

Continuing in the Belgian theme I’ve been going with lately, S House By Nicolas Schuybroek located in Cap d’Antibes, Côte d’Azur, France. Belgian architect Nicolas Schuybroek of NS Architects had recently completed a remarkable minimalist single story holiday house in the South of France. Situated in the Mediterranean on the Côte d’Azur, more specifically in Cap d’ Antibes. The linear, geometric, elegant and stunningly simple design is indeed rather artful in and of itself. However, when you bring into account, that of which the subtle way the landscape enters into and then exits the house,  can only be described as masterful. The single-family house which is located in a landscape of unique beauty holds a prime position where it looks out onto the natural milieu of the Mediterranean Sea and the Lérins Islands.  Schuybroek’s accomplishment is in both merging and juxtaposing the strong use of concrete with the surrounding lush environment. The single-story linear S House conceived as a volume positioned in its sea-side setting is indeed a volume which provides a sense of constructive continuity with large openings for enjoying the pool and sea-side views.

 

 

 

Photo © Julien Claessens & Thomas Deschamps

 


 

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ReSlope House in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata

ReSlope House in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata

Situated in Kobe, Japan ReSlope House in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata | The Hardt

 

Everyday life of 10000 times

The number of times for daily living will amazingly expand when you begin your life in a new house. First, notice that one year contains 365 days. Within 30 years, you will have spent more than 10,000 days. Everyday necessities such as cooking, cleaning, laundry, using the restroom or taking a bath are repeated more than 10,000 times. Thinking about it, to live daily in an affluent place such as a house can lead to enriched things. We try to consciously design houses for long-term daily living.

Joy, Anger, Grief, and Pleasure

In daily life, people live, experiencing a variety of emotions. One day you may feel fine as you can forgive anything. The next day you may feel withdrawn or overwhelmed by deep grief as you don’t feel like talking to anyone. There may be days positive feelings are encouraged by listening to the voice of your children jumping around at a reading room. We think that creating a house is to create a personal space which can embrace the complexity of human psychology.

Resident and Residence

People change as time goes by. Naturally, families can change as well. We have never ever thought of creating a house in order to adjust it to our clients or their families. We do keep in mind that we uniquely design a house for the existence of the person so that the space and the resident can connect with each other. We embrace a natural flow every time we create a totally different house.

Client and Architect

As an architect, listening to a client’s demand is essential. However, we do not think of creating architecture solely by accepting anything the client wishes. Space should be created by considering the essence of what a client does and does not wish. Every single day we design with such considerations in mind

 


 

© Toshiyuki Yano

If you’re as obsessed with Japanese architecture as much as I am, you’ll want to check these projects out as well – House In Kakinokizaka by Satoshi Okada – House in Hiro by Suppose Design Office – The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando (Not located in Japan but designed by a Japanese LEGEND) –  House in Hanekita by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

 


 

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