Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner

Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner

Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner located in Downtown Los Angeles, CA. USA | The Hardt

 

Arts District Loft (2016) by Marmol Radziner located in Downtown Los Angeles, CA. USA. The Arts District Loft is an alteration of a 2,000 ft² (186 m²) condominium loft in one of my favorite buildings in the arts district, or downtown LA for that matter, the Toy Factory Lofts, a 1924 warehouse located in the Arts District in Downtown Los Angeles. The alteration included the removal of existing partitions to combine two bedrooms into one master suite; the installation of casework to reconfigure the living room and bedroom; and the renovation of the kitchen, bathroom, and powder room. To create a more intimate living space also suitable for entertaining, we aimed to create distinct areas within the existing open floor plan. In the main space, we raised a 20-foot by 20-foot (6 x 6 meter) area 18 inches (46 cm) in the southeast corner to delineate a living room area and optimize the south- and east-facing windows. The resulting floor-to-ceiling windows provide a visual connection to the street that previously did not exist.

 

 


 

Separating the living room from the adjacent master suite is a custom bookcase with three bays that rotate 90 degrees. When left open, the bookcase lets in natural light from the living room windows, while the resulting ledge doubles as flexible seating for the master suite sitting area. Just north of the bedroom, we converted the area surrounding an existing concrete column into a study and coat closet. Against the industrial backdrop of the existing concrete floor and exposed structural concrete of the ceiling are inviting, modern interiors. We worked with an assortment of woods, textures, and metal finishes to visually warm and soften the space. A color palette of primarily warm gray tones and black complement the gray herringbone pattern oak floor and bold black custom casework built by our wood shop. The result is a comfortable home well-suited for entertaining – simple yet sophisticated.

 

© Jessie Webster

 


 

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The Loft by Architects EAT

The Loft by Architects EAT

The Loft by Architects EAT located in Australia | The Hardt

 

The Loft by Architects EAT located in Australia. “The loft – built inside the iconic MacRobertson chocolate factory in Melbourne‘s Fitzroy is a conversion of a gritty 2,690 ft² (250 m²) brick warehouse into a family home. Architects EAT have manipulated the former industrial building into a mixture of intimately scaled family spaces and vast entertaining voids. Two full height courtyards act as the lungs of the design, bringing both light and sky views deep into the internal space. The private areas such as the study and the bedroom are accommodated on the first floor, inside volumes of a more intimate scale.” The 125-year-old warehouse is now mostly residential, although the site was previously an advertising agency before the current owners purchased it. Before that, it was Melbourne’s first Akido Dojo martial arts studio. The architects made a huge effort to respect the building’s rich past, with initial plans often changing to suit on-site findings. The steel bridge made from a perforated base and stringers, connecting the upstairs mezzanine on either side of the loft, is especially compelling.

 

 

 

 

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Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider situated in Rotkehlchenweg, Potsdam, Germany | The Hardt

 

Antivilla by Brandlhuber+ Emde, Schneider situated in Rotkehlchenweg, Potsdam, Germany. Antivilla, the refurbished former German Democratic Republic lingerie factory “Ernst Lück“ at the Krampnitzsee, southwest of Berlin, questions the relationship between building regulations and standards, energy efficiency together with the idea re-use and adaptive living. Built between 2010 and 2014 Brandlhuber+ together with Pichler engineers developed a combined living and studio building with a new approach.

 

 

 


 

Instead of insulating the existing structure and to save costs, the façade was covered with shotcrete. To generate an open space all non-bearing walls were removed and a functional 20 square meter core with the staircase, bathroom, kitchenette, fireplace as well a sauna were installed in the center of both floors. Space can be zoned by simple transparent PVC curtains according to the actual climate needs. In the summertime, the curtains are retreated only to a 10 square meter bedroom in the 230 square meters open loft space, while in winter the heated area makes only 60 square meters of the whole floor area which includes moving the bed closer to the open fire.

 

The gable roof, made of corrugated asbestos plates, was removed and replaced by a flat concrete slab that structurally allowed big openings in the walls. These, up to five meters, large windows on the north and south facade, are the result of the collective work by friends hammering away the wall to create big openings which provide a scenic view over the nearby lake.

 

© Erica Overmeer

 


 

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Katzden Architec Factory (2016) by NISHIZAWA ARCHITECTS

Katzden Architec Factory (2016) by NISHIZAWA ARCHITECTS

Katzden Architect Factory (2016) by NISHIZAWA ARCHITECTS located in Ben Cat Town, Binh Duong Province, Vietnam | The Hardt

 

Katzden Architect Factory (2016) by NISHIZAWA ARCHITECTS located in Ben Cat Town, Binh Duong Province, Vietnam. Located in the Hardt of a new industrial park in Binh Duong, the factory was considered to be an iconic construction which is “simple but must-be-impressive” enough to be the face of this park. The client is a steel manufacturing company with the architectural products including staircases, handrails, bicycle stands,… Although factories are usually figured by purely pragmatic boxes for its efficiency and flexibility, we were strongly asked to design this factory to be an aesthetic object while functionality means everything with a limited budget but on the other hand, could offer a fresh working environment for human activities in a tropical climate.

 


 

Initially, to meet the demand of the standard budget for normal built-in factories, cubic simple form with 8m-span grid system was chosen as the dominant mass so as to match the neighborhood while reducing the expenditures. Using bricks for the exterior of the building would provide the opportunities to let the building itself work as a landmark with natural clay color contrast to the unobstructed neighborhood. Old bricks were collected from abandoned colonial buildings in the Mekong Delta area and recycled for the exterior layer. In order to decrease the weightiness of the massive brick cube as well as provide the air ventilation for the whole building, an enormous roof made by galvanized corrugated metal is lifted up with 10 ft (3-meter)-cantilevered-canopy in order to protect the indoor working areas from harsh sunlight, gusts, and squalls.

 

 


 

Right at the center of this man-made construction, 52 ft x 52 ft (16m x 16m) open-air garden celebrates a serene fragment of the tropical garden and refreshes the working spaces with the natural elements. When all the rotating doors are opened, the air flows could go through and refresh the environment inside the building. The courtyard itself, along with the water feature could functionally build up its own tropical diverse ecology with a sensual connection to changing the light and seasonal qualitative.

 


 

The landscape concept that we most desire for approach should provide as much as possible the tropical scenario for the factory. By that meaning, many kinds of tropical plants and fruit plants were installed such as Papayas, Bananas, Tamarinds, Malpighi glabras, Coconut trees, and especially dragon fruit ones which could be considered as one of our first-time attempts. We were inspired by the image of a field with countless rows of poles covered by dragon fruits triangular stems, which would be considered as common sceneries in middle Vietnam. The in-order pole system made by old bricks intentionally becomes the important landscape element, and tightly connects with the architecture itself. The design, which could preserve a large amount of greenery in order to serve as a “working environment closed to nature” for the employees as well as interacts the landscape and the building itself, could obtain the new tropical approach of designing factory.

 

© Hiroyuki Oki

 


 

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