Palmyra House by Studio Mumbai

Palmyra House by Studio Mumbai

Asher 1:30 am 9:19 am

Located in Nandgaon, Maharashtra, India, Palmyra House by Studio Mumbai | The Hardt

 

 

Studio Mumbai / Palmyra House from Daniele Marucci on Vimeo.

 

Located in Nandgaon, Maharashtra, India, Palmyra House by Studio Mumbai. The 3,000 ft² (278 m²) house consists of two wooden louvered structures set inside of a functioning coconut plantation.  Anchored to stone platforms, the structures overlook a network of wells and aqueducts that weave the site into an inhabitable whole. Living room, study, and master bedroom are contained in the north volume, while the south volume contains the kitchen, dining, and guest bedrooms. Set in the plaza between the buildings, the pool provides a channel for swimming, with expansive views of the sea to the west and views into a dense foliage of palms to the east.

 

 

 

Structural framing for the house was built of ain wood, a local hardwood, and was constructed using traditional interlocking joinery. The extensive louvers were handcrafted from the outer part of the Palmyra trunk (a local palm species). Exteriors are detailed with hand-worked copper flashing and standing seam aluminum roofs; interior surfaces are finished with teakwood and India Patent Stone, a refined pigmented plaster. Locally quarried black basalt was used to construct the stone plinths, aqueduct walls, and pool plaza.

©  Helene Binet

 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

The Riparian House (2015) by Architecture BRIO

The Riparian House (2015) by Architecture BRIO

Asher 2:25 pm 8:47 pm

The Riparian House (2015) by Architecture BRIO located in Karjat, India | The Hardt

 

The Riparian House (2015) by Architecture BRIO located in Karjat, India. Not a long drive away from Mumbai, a mountainous landscape rises up, called the Western Ghats. From this UNESCO world heritage area, numerous rivers and streams find their way down through an undulating landscape eventually feeding into the Bombay bay. The Riparian House is placed just below the top of a hillock at the foothills of the Ghats. The top of a vegetated roof merges with the top of the hillock, hiding the house from the approach on the east side. Inside the house, one can nevertheless enjoy the views to the north of the Irshalgad hill fortress and towards the west the sunset while the river winds its way across the agricultural fields.

 


 

Since the most of the site is steeply sloping with a 1:4 gradient, the vegetated roof gives the house an additional usable area. From the top it seems to be an extension of the natural landscape, enhancing the understatedness of the house. The green cover serves to keep the house below cool due to its insulative properties. Along the central axis of the house landscaped steps lead you along a coarse stone wall towards the pool deck. The second set of steps connects to the main level of the house where the axis culminates via the dining room and kitchen into a light-filled courtyard. The experience of being inside the earth is enhanced through the stone boulders which were discovered during the excavation process and retain the earth. The kitchen occupies a central position along with the open to sky courtyard and is flanked on either side by two bedrooms at the two far ends. These spaces are embedded in the earth with windows bringing in ample light from above and the riverside. A master bedroom, bathroom, dining, and living area sit along the front, a more open face of the house. Both the living room in the western corner of the house and the master bedroom in the northern corner enjoy panoramic views of the river.

 

 

 


 

Galvanized steel mullioned windows break down the scale of the front façade of the house. A rhythmic row of bamboo poles is placed at close intervals in front of the house to create a layer of privacy without obstructing the spectacular view of the river and the mountains beyond. The bamboo enclosure creates a dialogue between the interior and the dramatically changing landscape. The natural landscape changes from a dense brightly green colored jungle-like forest during the monsoon months to a pale brown shrubby wasteland during the dry and hot summer months. The building has to respond to these extreme conditions by allowing enough shade and breeze during the summer and providing a waterproof indoor environment during the stormy monsoons. The screen of columns creates an ever-changing pattern of light and shadow throughout the seasons and times of the day, making the building a ‘sensor’ of light. The walls are built in Indian limestone in a coarse pattern, which makes the house seem to rise out of the ground giving it a solid base. This is contrasted by the lightness of a suspended timber deck verandah which surrounds the house on three sides. The covered verandahs allow for comfortably ventilated and shaded semi-indoor spaces. Internally the timber floor continuous as a border around various patterned natural stone floors. In front of the living room, the deck extends to form a large outdoor deck with a panoramic view of the surrounding landscape

 

 

© Ariel Huber / EDIT images

 

 


 

 

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https://thehardt.com/architecture/casa-o-01arq/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/ya-house-2015-by-kubota-architect-atelier/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/borgo-merlassino-2015-by-deamicis-architetti/

 

 


House on Pali Hill by Studio Mumbai

House on Pali Hill by Studio Mumbai

Asher 4:03 am 8:48 pm

House on Pali Hill by Studio Mumbai located in Bandra West, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India | The Hardt

 

House on Pali Hill by Studio Mumbai located in Bandra West, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. An existing house on a narrow site was stripped down, exposing its bare concrete frame to the surrounding trees. Re-programmed and built with an additional floor and terrace, the house sits protected inside layers of glass, wooden screens, planted trellises and curtains providing grades of privacy and enclosure within the urban environment. The entrance gallery leads to a double height living space that opens out onto a timber deck and a public garden. A polished limestone floor gently reflects the landscape while pigmented lime plaster walls softly absorb light. On the first floor, light is drawn through a clerestory volume into the family room, rendering a warm glow to this open, generous space. A corridor leading to the bedrooms culminates in an intimate window seat.

 

 

 

 

Photos by © Helene Binet

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

https://thehardt.com/architecture/utsav-house-2007-studio-mumbai/

 


 

 

The Lodhi + Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects

The Lodhi + Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects

Asher 4:57 am 8:48 pm

The Lodhi+ Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects located in New Delhi, India | The Hardt

 

 

 

 


 

The Lodhi + Aman New Delhi by Kerry Hill Architects located in New Delhi, India. The luxury hotel won the Commendation for International Architecture at the AIA’s 2010 National Architecture Awards. On the streets of New Delhi’s Lodhi quarter, the Hotel Aman New Delhi explodes onto the pious and solemn outskirts of the city, adjacent to the Nizam Uddin mausoleum. Sprung from the imagination of the celebrated Australian architect, Kerry Hill, this luxury establishment is daringly trendy in style, plunging guests into a delicately contemporary universe. The design furniture and sculpted Rajasthan stone walls make the Aman New Delhi a worthy representative of the prestigious Amanresorts hotel group. The 31 rooms and 8 suites spread over 9 floors contain jaalis (perforated stone with geometric patterns) and open onto the hustle and bustle of the Indian capital. But for perfect moments of relaxation, there’s nothing better than taking advantage of the wide range of massages and treatments available at the hotel’s spa.

 


 

 

The stunning silhouette of Aman New Delhi is located not far from the mausoleum of Nizam Ud Din, an Indian Sufi master. Although the neighborhood is as described in the Blue Guide as a “survivor of the medieval world marked with poetry and fervor”, the hotel is a perfect example of a contemporary and daring contrast, in line with all the other contradictions that one finds in the Indian capital. Owned by the Aman Resorts group, the hotel’s 31 rooms and 8 suites are on 9 levels with a magnificent view of Lodhi quarter and its monuments. The sophisticated, modern and elegant interiors are the work of Australian architect, Kerry Hill who created an intelligent blend of traditional Indian architecture and contemporary furniture. Sculpted walls from Rajasthan, windows and partitions pierced with jaalis or embroidery type stone decorations and dark wood furniture give the rooms a discreet luxury, conforming to the Aman group’s policy of hospitality.

 

 

 


 

Amanresorts and The Lodhi have created a six-night itinerary to experience the vibrant culture of India, including two night stays at The Lodhi and Amanbagh and Aman-i-Khas, in Rajasthan. It includes daily breakfast for two and one activity per resort per stay. Visit India’s cosmopolitan capital New Delhi. Located in Lutyen’s Delhi, just minutes from Rashtrapati Bhavan, the peaceful Lodhi gardens, Humayun’s Tomb and many other iconic sites, The Lodhi provides a tranquil heart for one of the world’s most colorful and cosmopolitan capital cities. Offering essential respite on a six-acre property, this city-based retreat is an elegant haven of leisure facilities including The Lodhi Spa, Gym, Pilates studio, Tennis and Squash courts and a variety of restaurants. All Lodhi rooms and suites feature private plunge pools. The Lodhi, formerly the Aman New Delhi, is the ideal base from which to experience the city’s wealth of historical, cultural and contemporary attractions.

 


 

As a haven of serenity in the midst of the urban hustle and bustle of New Delhi, the Aman spirit, a word derived from the Sanskrit word for peace, prevails throughout the hotel. In addition, it’s hard to resist the traditional Indian treatments offered by the hotel’s spa.

 


 

 

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The House Of Secret Gardens (2018) by Spasm Design

The House Of Secret Gardens (2018) by Spasm Design

Asher 2:59 am 3:51 am

The House Of Secret Gardens (2018) by Spasm Design located in Ahmedabad, India | The Hardt

 

The House Of Secret Gardens (2018) by Spasm Design located in Ahmedabad, India. This is a private home in Ahmedabad, is an expression in Dhrangadhra stone. The stone used in many of the architectural antiquities of Ahmedabad. The stone has a mottled texture and bone coloration, available in blocks; slabs and dust from quarries nearby it became an obvious choice. It ages pretty well too. The cellular structure of this sandstone holds intermittent microscopic air gaps, acting as an insulation panel itself. This led to the idea of cladding the entire body of the house as a monolith. The organization of the plan is like a simple cross. This allows for one room thick arms, hence permitting easy cross ventilation and the possibility of a seamless connection with the outdoors. The stone is used in giant blocks vertically to form a periphery, a border to the gardens to frame the edges, allow breezes, and a sense of containment and scale. This frame allows the home to be immersed in the greens, considered imagery and landscape will form the surrounds of the cross-shaped construct.

 


 

From the entry through to the main stair volume at the Centre of the cross, the hallways of the home are so modulated that the sense of sauntering between inside and outside is heightened. Even externally, the body of the house can be surmounted via ascending stairs in solid stone, to discover an elevated garden roof. This home promotes the use of external spaces, all along the edges of the cross layout. Courtyards facilitating the conventional movement of air will be a major part of the passive climate control in the home, stone fins, rough cuts perpendicular to the building face, cause incident shadows hence cooling the face and creating an ever-changing rhythm of shadows and light. The interiors are embellished with rich woodwork boxes that contain wardrobes and large luxurious ensuite bathrooms, sitting within a volume of ceilings and walls all rendered in lime plaster had applied like stucco. Chosen from the client’s collection and commissioned from local artists, the home will abound several bespoke objects and pieces, many of which are designed by SPASM for this project in particular. We searched for a custom fit to the client’s lifestyle, aspirations, and needs. A project in which the architecture is inspired and echoes a contemporary yet sensible and slick way of occupying the site. Intended as seamless extensions of the living spaces the gardens will over the years mature as view boxes which come alive with the moving sun, breezes animating them and rain imbuing the home with the fresh aroma of the dry earth thirst quenched.

 

 

 

 


 

A long search for an appropriate emotion for the water body, ended in the commissioning of a life-size sculpture of a pensive monk, in Beslana stone gingerly poised on the water’s surface as if levitating. His long search for the right architect ended with us, ever since a call every single day without fail followed, clearly we became like a drug, a fix, keeping the daily sense of invention, ideas and fervor going. We, love this depth of involvement, his curious nature in unraveling how each aspect of his ask and beyond was arrived at…The aim was to deliver a home which allows its occupants to live a life in the bosom of nature, sensing the seasons, entertaining their family and friends and juicing the joys of a well-played life… with art, sculpture, objects, contributing to the serenity of the home. The architecture we believe is about summoning beauty and distilling moments of tranquil inner happiness, an awareness of just being and celebrating a single breath when everything is perfect.

 

 
 
© Umang Shah

 

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