Lavaflow 5 (2013) by Craig Steely Architecture

Lavaflow 5 (2013) by Craig Steely Architecture

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Lavaflow 5 (2013) by Craig Steely Architecture located in Hawaii County | The Hardt

 

Lavaflow 5 (2013) by Craig Steely Architecture located in Hawaii County. The 2,800 ft² (260 m²) house is situated on thirty acres of remote pasture, Lavaflow 5 frames the sea and sky with structure and line. The slender steel frame supports walls of varying opacity; from nothing to glass, to screen, to solid – creating a laminate of materials tempering the expansive view overlooking the Hamakua coastline on the eastern slope of Mauna Kea on Hawaii’s Big Island. The remoteness of the site, our desire for large open expanses, and a commitment to build sustainability led us to investigate prefabrication in steel as a method of construction. We began by researching standard prefabrication systems but all that was available seemed clumsy and lacking the refinement we desired. So working closely with our structural engineer, we designed and developed a bolt together a structural system based on 8”x8” wide flange beams that allowed for long spans of steel while keeping the elegance of scale we had envisioned.

 

 


 

The frame was fabricated in San Francisco by a shop that usually focuses on small-scale architectural steelwork. They built this frame to the tolerances they usually apply to their staircases. An off-the-shelf corrugated self-supporting roof system was integrated into the structural engineering and delivered to the site along with the steel frame. It took five days to erect the steel frame and roof. Lavaflow 5 sits at the top of the property protected from the strong winds that are a constant on this side of the island. The house is long and thin with all rooms looking north towards the ocean. Circulation is on the south side and sun is mitigated along this extended hall with an epoxy resin screen – a product usually used for industrial decking. The house is elevated above the site and entered across a 50’x 50’ reflecting pond.

 


 

The narrow plan of the house provides passive cooling through cross ventilation allowing for the elimination of mechanical air conditioning. The industrial screen filters the sunlight creating a consistent and diffused interior light quality throughout the day. Another sustainable feature includes a solar heating system for all domestic hot water.  This decidedly simple building of steel, concrete, and glass provides the essential requirements for living while focusing attention on living experientially in Hawaii’s dynamic environment.

 

© Bruce Damonte

 

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

House on the Lake (2012) by AUM architecture

 

Horizon Roof House by Shinichi Ogawa & Associates

Jungle House (2015) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo

 


 

Seascape Retreat by Pattersons

Seascape Retreat by Pattersons

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Seascape Retreat by Pattersons situated in secluded Banks Peninsula, Canterbury, New Zealand. The 1,184 ft² (110 m²) cottage was designed as a honeymoon retreat for paying guests and consists of three rooms; a lobby, a living/sleeping room and a bathroom. Constructed largely from rock quarried near its site with in-situ poured concrete floors and an earth turfed roof.  It is self-sustainable with respect to on-site water harvesting and wastewater treatment. The project incorporated an extensive reforestation and re-vegetation subproject.  
 

 


The retreat is constructed largely from rock quarried near its site with in-situ poured concrete floors and an earth turfed roof. This robust structure is integrated into the escarpment above to protect occupants from falling debris and then lined with horizontal macrocarpa timber. The lining forms integrated joinery, services, wall and ceiling panels and shelters behind double glazed low E-glass in a storm and shatterproof steel mullions, which utilize earthquake resistant sliding heads.

The cottage is a shelter designed as a honeymoon retreat for paying guests and consists of three rooms; a lobby, a living/sleeping room and a bathroom.

 
Its plan and section use an interlocking geometry to respond to two views, a three-quarter outlook along the face of the cove and a far view aligning with a double rock arch called “The Comb.” The Comb collapsed into a simple rock spire during the February 2011 Christchurch earthquake.
 

Clover House (2015) by R.C.TECH

Clover House (2015) by R.C.TECH

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Located in Nisi, Greece, Clover House (2015) by R.C.TECH | The Hardt

 

Located in Nisi, Greece, Clover House (2015) by R.C.TECH. Clover House is located on the south side of the island of Kythera in Greece, where gentle Mediterranean hills with low vegetation descend towards the sea. The architectural composition sought to integrate the building harmoniously into the surrounding landscape. The development of the house is linear, parallel to the views and the contour lines. It breaks into two smaller ground floor volumes – the main house and a guests suite. An arch act as the connecting element of the two wings, a reference to the local form of ‘sfendonia’. The corridor created between the two main building blocks, crowned by the large arch, forms a transverse viewing axis. Tapered walls enhance the sense of the building’s proportions, a feature often found in structures around the island.


 


 

The residence develops behind a vertical plane formed by a curved stone wall that runs along the north side of the house. Its monolithic figure refers to the walls of the Venetian castle that sits in direct view, on the opposite slope. This curved diaphragm serves also as a windbreaker to the house from the northerly prevailing winds during the winter months. The openings on the north side are small, yet capable to allow the cool north breeze to enter during the summer months. Large longitudinal pergolas provide shadow to the exterior verandas in the south. A sculptural concrete staircase leads to the terraces above for better viewing angles.

 

© Pygmalion Karatzas

 

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 

 


Plane House (2011) by K-Studio

Plane House (2011) by K-Studio

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Situated in Skiathos Island, Greece, Plane House (2011) by K-Studio | The Hardt

 

Situated in Skiathos Island, Greece, Plane House (2011) by K-Studio. Summer in the Greek islands is all about being outside. The aim of the Plane House is to merge internal and external space, maximizing the benefits of both and minimizing the impact on the surrounding landscape. To avoid block volumes that split and dominate space, horizontal planes are inserted into the slope, immediately providing levels for sunbathing, sleeping and eating, as well as vast, open area of shade. They cool and shade the space beneath whilst allowing the flow of sunlight and maintaining the stunning 270-degree view over the coastline. Space between the planes is defined by various flexible panels and glazed screens. Designated cooking, eating and relaxation zones are offset from each other to provide coziness without sacrificing openness.

 

 

 


 

The pool is strategically placed to enjoy the view but also to create a cooling breeze over the terrace and into the house as the north wind flows uphill and over its surface. Photovoltaic panels power the pool mechanics and grey-water is recycled and used for irrigation, toilet flushing, and fire extinguishing. The landscape is respected and continues over the green roof plane, creeps up along the site boundaries and penetrates vertically through the roof as existing trees stand in the space, undisturbed.

 


 

The powerful identity of the concrete planes creates a strong narrative on approaching the house from the coastal road that winds below. From a distance, the planes are distinctively separated but as you draw nearer and approach the house from the side, the perspective alters closing the gap between them. On arrival and on entering the space they part once more, opening to reveal the breathtaking view and let the fresh air flow through.

 

© Yiorgos Kordakis

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

Jungle House (2015) by Studio MK27 – Marcio Kogan + Samanta Cafardo

 

 


House in Otori (2014) by Arbol Design

ReSlope House in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata

 


 

Ktima House (2014) by Camilo Rebelo + Susana Martins

Ktima House (2014) by Camilo Rebelo + Susana Martins

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Situated in Antiparos, Greece, Ktima House (2014) by Camilo Rebelo + Susana Martins. The main idea of the project was based on two elements: the existing walls, at different levels, and the platforms created by those walls. The elevations of the two house levels are broken lines that were created as a continuation of the existing site walls. The topography helps to dissimulate the house.


Ktima, in Greek, means farm or parcel with fertile land. The project site is a plot with steep slopes, mostly green, with a few trees that are an exception in the context of Antiparos Island.

 

In the Greek regulations, volumes can’t exceed ten meters long and this rule dictates the composition rhythm, always related to the interior spaces. All of them have distinct landscape framing and particularly varied in the amount and intensity of light. Based on a large program we decided to divide the house into two levels: the entry level being the main house and the lower level the guesthouse, service, and staff areas. The house was built following the local construction tradition and the island regulations – those aspects were crucial to the house expression.

This house has a particularly favorable condition from the sustainable point of view: the green roof guarantees with efficiency a constant temperature in the interior, without the need of powerful cooling systems. On the back of the house, we incorporated a few patios that are extremely important for both levels ventilation. So we tried to use simple architecture elements to achieve low energy consuming.
Residence in Kato Kifissia by Tense Architecture Network

Residence in Kato Kifissia by Tense Architecture Network

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Located in Municipality of Kifisia, Greece, Residence in Kato Kifissia by Tense Architecture Network | The Hardt

 

sLocated in Municipality of Kifisia, Greece, Residence in Kato Kifissia by Tense Architecture Network. The residence’s plot is small and an adjacent building almost blocks the southern sun. The main part of the field should remain free and become the residence itself: an austere prism, centrally supported, hovers above the liberated ground.At first, an area was defined: a cubic shell of plants creates a limit for the house. In order to reside, ones withdraw in. Three metallic columns support a net of inox ropes where plants have already started to climb in order to generate a volume equally important to the house’s prisms.  When the plants are grown the green screen will be penetrated only by the black, central column of the concrete shelter. The basalt-watery surface on which it is based reflects the light in the interior. Exposed concrete is dark tinted where a greater depth, a sense of anchoring was necessary. Artificial light is cautiously managed in order to protect the night and the intimacy that dim light offers.

 

 


 

The shell remains intact towards the main façade. The public image of the residence will eventually recede behind the plants and the house will claim the whole field. The vigorously detached prism lets the sun enter and functions as a shelter: living space lies beneath. When the sliding panels retreat, the merging with the garden is complete. The space that the elevated prism creates is the main compositional gesture. The manner that this gesture is performed is crucial:  it is the manner through which the hovering prism is supported by the central column. A calm tension is realized, a simple yet clear correlation of forces. The synergy between structural and architectural design gives a residence where the shell is not more important than its field. Those are juxtaposed: one to one.

 

© Filippo Poli

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando

The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando

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The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando | The Hardt

 

As we’ve gone over before, I am always hesitant to post Tadao Ando’s work, mainly because I never feel like I’ll do the project justice it deserves, presenting it to you all. He is by far my favorite architect and the fact that he’s self-taught is one of the most inspiring aspects of him and his work as I have no formal education or experience in architecture, art or design, everything is intuitive and learning by doing. Anyways, The House in Sri Lanka, or so-called by the Japanese architect Tadao Ando who designed it, is set against a paradise on earth. White sandy beaches, dotted with coconut palm trees and huts draped with leaves from these trees, weave in and out of cliffs in Mirissa, located at the southern tip of Sri Lanka. Crocodiles and water snakes splash in its rivers, black monkeys, wild elephants and even leopards roam freely on its land. Local fishermen languorously wait for fish to swim towards them on wooden sticks firmly wedged into the sand along the edge of the sea. The name of the house is perhaps enough to suggest its majestic presence: clad in exposed concrete, the house perches on top of a cliff, as if it were indeed a leopard whose claws edge towards the Indian Ocean. The house was a gift from a husband to a wife. Sri Lanka has been the Belgian couple’s home for the past 30 years.

 

 

 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

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