In Praise of Shadows (2014) by Pitsou Kedem Architects

In Praise of Shadows (2014) by Pitsou Kedem Architects

Located in Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel, In Praise of Shadows (2014) by Pitsou Kedem Architects | The Hardt

 

Located in Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel, In Praise of Shadows (2014) by Pitsou Kedem Architects. Mass and space combine together in a perforated, weathered steel (Cor-Ten™) structure that creates and sets clear boundaries for the home. The structure regulates the amount of sunlight penetrating the building’s spaces and controls the angle of sight both into and from the building whilst creating a controlled, visual dialogue between the inside and the outside. The structure is constructed from layers and areas. The central area which is the central space, the residential area which centers around a double, communal living space and the external area, the weathered steel structure which defines a border and area for the building whilst creating new, intermediary areas that combine the inside and the outside.

 

 


 

The external area, the weathered steel layer is seen as being two dimensioned from afar but does, in effect, have volume and can be experienced almost as a piece of sculpture or work of art and not just in terms of its function as part of the building’s structure. This same structure creates the building’s most important element, an element that has no physical aspect and takes up no volume or space – the layer of shadow. Shadows projected onto the walls and floor result from the building’s external structure’s early planning that relates to the angle of the suns light on the plot. This early planning allowed the architect to create areas and complete surfaces used as a canvas for the shadows to paint upon. The building is constructed of exposed concrete walls, large and inanimate and, without the movement of light and shade, they appear almost monastic. The shade and shadows moving across the building’s surfaces create a dynamic drama that makes the entire mass seem to be alive and full of movement. Sometimes the shadows and shade create repeating geometric shapes that sometimes stretch the entire length of the wall and sometimes creating unique blends of color and depth on the grey walls.

 

 


 

Light and shade on the structure enhance the user’s experience in the space and provides the space with structural richness, movement, and a certain mystery. The materials chosen for the building’s construction are all in their raw state (concrete, weathered steel, and wood) with sunlight changing their colors throughout the day. The weathered steel takes on a bright orange color during the day and towards evening, appears almost black. The considered use of the most abundant resource available in the local climate, sunlight, allowed the designer to create an entire world of contrasts and suspense seen in one project: between mass and lightness, between silence and dynamism, between simple and complex, between light and dark, between mysterious and the known. Together, they enrich the structure both from an architectural point of view and the relationships between the building’s spaces and those living in them. A still cactus garden enhances the dry atmosphere and the silence with only the shadows of the cacti on the concrete walls and ceilings bringing the garden to life and acting as a symbol for the entire project.

 

© Amit Geron

 


 

 

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House in Rishpon (2017) by Studio de Lange

House in Rishpon (2017) by Studio de Lange

Located in Rishpon, Israel, House in Rishpon (2017) by Studio de Lange | The Hardt

 

Located in Rishpon, Israel, House in Rishpon (2017) by Studio de Lange. Laid on a 2 acre (8,000 sqm) (2 Acre) plot, two concrete rectangles perpendicular to one another form the letter T. Between them stands a light vertical element. This home was envisioned as an unfolding sequence of simple geometric forms that compose an entire spatial experience. The abundant landscape, including grassland areas and pool, was seen as an integral part of the whole form. Weaving their way through the concrete structures, they merge the outdoors with the built environment. The design plan is minimalist and the material scale is monochrome. It includes natural stone, exposed concrete, and aluminum, all found in varying quantities on the exterior as well as the interior of the home. The material and color palettes were greatly restrained so not to overbear the space; allowing space itself to be an adequate airy platform for the residents and their exquisite art and design collection.

 

 

 


 

Concrete and white walls combine with large slabs of natural stone flooring. These are strung together by natural wood staircases that delicately stitch the different floors. The prominent color detail found is an array of black. Used throughout in architectural details, such as all the window profiles & outdoor porches as well as in design choices such as the entry door and kitchen façade. Black is used in both wood and metal textures, as those are complementary to the exposed concrete; which serves as the base material in the palette. This work is the result of a fruitful dialogue with veteran clients who have vast knowledge and love of art and design. It is the owners’ art and design collection, intertwined with the architecture that creates this home elegant atmosphere.

© Amit Geron

 


 

 

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Private House in Tel Aviv (2016) by Bar Orian Architects

Private House in Tel Aviv (2016) by Bar Orian Architects

Located in Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel, Private House in Tel Aviv (2016) by Bar Orian Architects | The Hardt

 

Located in Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel, Private House in Tel Aviv (2016) by Bar Orian Architects. Although at first glance the exterior of this home reminds one of a prison, its just seems to work. The reasoning behind the design of it is a rather common exploitation of natural light, executed nicely. Each window is set for an interior function and acts as an interior frame from the shading system that has been positioned to accommodate sunlight and the climatic needs of each interior space. This system allows various degrees of light filtering, creating an additional layer that enriches the space and brings the tangible outdoors experience into the house. This layer changes continuously with the direction of the sun, the amount of opening of the shading system. At the time, the rooms are flooded with shades of red, creating unique compositions inside and varying exposure outside.

 

 

 

 

 

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