Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect located in Urada, Niigata, Japan | The Hardt

 

Australia House (2012) by Andrew Burns Architect located in Urada, Niigata, Japan. The project was initiated following the collapse of the original Australia House (a 100-year-old Japanese farmhouse). It is essentially a disaster recovery project, but of a cultural type. The structure has been overdesigned so it can function as a refuge during future disasters.

Less than one year from the announcement of a competition to completion of construction. This required fantastic groundwork from the Australian Embassy, Tokyo, and rapid construction by the local contractors, Iizuka Constructions and Onojeima Constructions. Simple clear geometry that creates possibilities, rather shutting them down through excessive architectural authorship… The main gallery focusses on the embankment, rather than the dramatic valley view. In this way the embankment, tilted up, becomes the third wall of the gallery, creating opportunities for artists and curators to engage with the landscape.

 

 


 

By focussing on an ordinary view, rather than an extraordinary view, it seeks to remind us of the value of ordinary, local things, post GFC and post great east Japan Earthquake. A unique collaboration between artist and architect to embed a permanent work within the gallery. The work can be concealed by a large cedar clad panel. It is my hope that a new permanent work will be embedded in the gallery space at each Triennale, so in 15 years time you could walk into the space and reveal 6 compelling permanent works.

 


 

The design resonates with the many utilitarian structures in the region, a steep roof, direct expression and located close to the road so as to be easy to access during snowfall. I did not so much as reference these buildings when I was designing it, but followed the same basic logic that they follow. The steeply pitched roof form rises to the daikoku-bashira (king post), creating a tall gallery space within a compact volume. Despite its size (120 sqm), this building conveys an institutional quality, although it also has the ambiguous presence of a rural structure and an art object.

 

© Brett Boardman

 


 

 

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F-House by Kubota Architect Atelier

F-House by Kubota Architect Atelier

F-House by Kubota Architect Atelier, located in Yamaguchi, Japan | The Hardt

 

F-House by Kubota Architect Atelier, located in Yamaguchi, Japan. The concrete panel of this house, whose form appears to be derived from a folded piece of paper, brings in the scenery of the surrounding mountain, while the visibility from the exterior in shut on the other side, from the roadside. Although the maximum height of the building is 4.75m and its exterior appears to be quite compact, its interior space has a large volumetric capacity. The reason for applying such form language is to provide an experience of realizing your perception extending over the cliff and the scenery of it’s beyond by standing inside of the building. The sharply cut end of the panel, the deeply extending eaves, the glass fixing details reducing the visibility of lines-all those are done to produce such experience. I essentially think that a house will be better to be a quite and a casual space for spending daily lives. Then, this building is completed by overlaying the beauty of the surrounding nature that constantly changes.

 

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White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects

White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects

White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects situated in Kanazawa City, Japan | The Hardt

 

White Cave House by Takuro Yamamoto Architects situated in Kanazawa City, Japan, an area known for heavy snowfall. The white minimal house still features many external spaces, despite the weather. The house’s exterior appears as a plain white volume, with one surface interrupted by an aperture that creates the parking space and a covered entrance passage to protect the owners from the winter snowfall. This void continues around a corner, where it becomes a secluded courtyard visible from the open plan kitchen and living space through full-height windows.

 

White Cave House is a massive lump engraved by a series of voids interconnected in the shape of a kinked tube. The connection of voids – we call it Cave – is the theme of this house. Internal rooms are designed to enjoy the minimum views of Cave characterized by its whiteness. At the same time, this concept is also the practical solution to realize a courtyard house in Kanazawa city known for heavy snow in Japan. The client’s original request was a white minimally-designed house with many external spaces, such as a large snow-proof approach to the entrance, a roofed garage for multiple cars, a terrace facing to the sky, and a courtyard. Though a roofed entrance and a garage are desirable for a snowy place, it takes so many floor areas away from the internal rooms for the family, while space and the budget is limited. In addition, the courtyard style itself is not suitable to the snowy country because courtyards would be easily buried under snow.

 

 


 

To solve the problems, we proposed to connect these external spaces one another into a large single tube, or Cave, and have each part serve multiple purposes in order to make up for the space limitations. We designed Cave unstraight because it prevents passengers outside from seeing through, though it is not closed. By this arrangement, Cave takes a new turn for each part letting in the sunshine while protecting the privacy of the courtyard, the terrace, and the internal rooms. The family inside can enjoy the view of Cave changing its contrast throughout a day under the sunshine. Cave also serves as a route to remove snow from the external spaces in winter, otherwise, you would be at a loss with a lot of snow in the enclosed courtyard. In order to make Cave deserve its name more, we wondered if we could add the reflection of water to the house because we thought water is inseparable from white caves. We eventually figured out that the terrace was an appropriate site to place it.  The terrace covered by white waterproof FRP holds a thin layer of water like a white basin. On the terrace reflecting the sky view without obstacles, you may feel that Cave has brought you to another world far from the daily life.

 


 

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Fleuve (2013) by APOLLO Architects & Associates

Fleuve (2013) by APOLLO Architects & Associates

Fleuve (2013) by APOLLO Architects & Associates located in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan | The Hardt

 

Fleuve (2013) by APOLLO Architects & Associates located in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. The client, who is a hair stylist/a salon owner, requested us to design a house with a hair salon. It is an exclusive and luxurious hair salon where the salon owner himself provides all services, and the number of clients is limited to only two at the same time. Our design strategy is to minimize the size of the salon, to create a compact and intimate space where the hair stylist gives utmost attention and professional service to the customer. On the contrary, we provide the maximum floor area of the house. The glass-clad salon has a stylish and sharp atmosphere, but the sharpness is softened by greenery in the front yard and low and deep eaves above it.  Lounge for resting is provided as a buffer zone between the hair salon and the house. And entrance court with a family symbol tree is specially designed as a transitional zone where the client is able to switch his mood from business to private.

 

 


 

The client’s wife practices tea ceremony, so we design a Japanese room to welcome tea guests, with a compact courtyard (called “Tsubo-Niwa” in Japanese) attached. Our intention is to fill the space with an atmosphere of a warm welcome from the hair salon to the tearoom, and in and out of the house. On the second floor, family room and child’s room are divided by the stairs in between. Study room in the middle acts as an intermediate space in between. The roof of the hair salon becomes a wide roof balcony adjacent to the family room. It can be used as an extended family room on occasions such as big parties with many guests. From the windows, one can enjoy the view of the family symbol tree, along with the beautiful background of the adjacent park and trees along the street.

 

© Masao Nishikawa

 


 

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Light Walls House (2013) by mA-style Architects

Light Walls House (2013) by mA-style Architects

Light Walls House (2013) by mA-style Architects located in Toyo kawa, Japan | The Hardt

 

 

Light Walls House (2013) by mA-style Architects located in Toyo kawa, Japan. The site is in a shady location where a two-story neighboring house closely stands on the south side, and even the shade and shadow on the path intensify the impression of darkness. Therefore, the design intended to create a space with uniformly distributed light by adjusting the way of letting daylight in, and the way of directing the light. By taking into consideration the space for the residents, the functions for a living, and the relationship with the surrounding environment, the creation of a diversity and richness in the house were intended by controlling the concept of light.

 


 

Along the edges of the 9.1m square roof, skylights are made, as if creating an outline, in order to provide sunlight. The roof beams narrow the sunlight, and the slightly angled clapboard interior walls with laminated wood reflect and diffuse the light. As a result, soft and uniformly distributed light is created and surrounds the entire space. Along the outline of lighting, workspaces such as a kitchen, bathroom, and study are arranged. Private spaces such as bedrooms and storage are allocated into four boxes. The path-like spaces created between them are public spaces. Each box attempts to balance within a large spatial volume. Light coupled with the rhythm of scale raises the possibilities of the living space for the residents.

 

 


 

Considering each box as a house, the empty spaces in between can be seen as paths or plazas, and remind us of a small town enclosed in the light. The empty spaces, which cause shortening or elongating of distances between people, are intermediate spaces for the residents, as well as intermediate spaces that are connected to the outside when the corridor is open, and these are the image of a social structure that includes a variety of individuals. In terms of a natural component, in which light is softened by small manipulations, and of a social component, in which a town is created in the house, this house turned out to be a courtyard house of light where new values are discovered.

 

© Kai Nakamura

 


 

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