The Hardt Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden 7 Sub Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin Architecture Design Landscape  Myles Baldwin Landscape Architecture landscape australia   Image of Luxurious sub tropical Melbourne garden 7

Sub-Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin

Sub-tropical Melbourne Garden by Sydney landscape designer Myles Baldwin | The Hardt

 

The owners of this Melbourne garden wanted to give it a non-Melbourne look, so they asked Sydney landscape designer Myles Baldwin to help them rework it. The result is a garden that features larger, more exotic foliage in defiance of the usual cooler-climate trends.

 

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(1/6) The entry garden displays layered texture, with a transplanted Japanese maple, Agave attenuate, assorted succulents and soft underplanting.

 

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(2/6) An imposing bronze sculpture by Australian-American artist Clement Meadmore makes a statement in the entry garden, under a canopy of transplanted maples, lush foliage and clipped English box (Buxus sempervirens).

 

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(3/6) Clipped grey germander contrasts with subtropical cycads at the side of the tennis court.

 

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(4/6) French fiber cement pots are planted with fan aloes (Aloe plicatilis) and Senecio.

 

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(5/6) The classic Gothic revival house is accented by the newly transplanted Canary Island date palm. The palm was just one super-advanced plants freighted down from Sydney to provide instant impact and maturity.

 

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(6/6) A geometric tiled wall catches the eye. The layered planting scheme also extends to the vertical surfaces in the garden. On the courtyard walls, English ivy (Hedera helix) and Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) are planted together, with Asian jasmine (Trachelospermum asiaticum) spilling over from the top.

 


 

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Magnum 80 Designed By Pininfarina for Magnum Marine

 


House in Preguiçosas (2015) by Branco-DelRio Arquitectos

IT IS A GARDEN (2016) by ASSISTANT

 

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Black Desert House by Oller & Pejic Architecture

Completed in 2012 and located in Joshua Tree, CA Black Desert House by Oller & Pejic Architecture | The Hardt

 

Completed in 2012 and located in Joshua Tree, CA Black Desert House by Oller & Pejic Architecture. The dark color of the 1,560 ft²  (145 m²) house interior adds to the primordial cave-like feeling.  During the day, the interior of the house recedes and the views are more pronounced.  At night the house completely dematerializes and the muted lighting and stars outside blend to form an infinite backdrop for contemplation. Live on the site right now. Link in bio #JoshuaTree #CA #Architecturelpo#Desert

This project began with an e-mail and a meeting in fall of 2008 for a house in Yucca Valley, which is located near Palm Springs, east of Los Angeles in the high desert near the Joshua Tree National Park. We had completed two projects in Yucca Valley and occasionally received inquiries about projects in the desert.  In the midst of the economic downturn typically these inquiring led nowhere.  We had just had our second child and things were looking rather uncertain.  We decided to meet with Marc and Michele Atlan to see if their project was a reality.  Even from the first communications, Marc’s enthusiasm was noticeable.

 

 

 


 

After the first meeting, we found that we shared a common aesthetic and process and after seeing the property we knew this was a project like nothing else we had done, really almost a once in a lifetime opportunity.  There was no looking back, we immediately began work on the house. Beyond the technical and regulatory challenges of building on the site- several previous owners had tried and given up there was the challenge of how to build appropriately on such a sublime and pristine site.  It is akin to building a house in a natural cathedral.

Our client had given us a brief but compelling instruction at the start of the process- to build a house like a shadow.  This had a very specific relevance to the desert area where the sunlight is often so bright that the eye’s only resting place is the shadows. Unfortunately, the site had been graded in the 1960’s when the area was first subdivided for development.  A small flat pad had been created by flattening several rock outcroppings and filing in a saddle between the outcroppings.  To try to reverse this scar would have been cost prohibitive and ultimately impossible.  It would be a further challenge to try to address this in the design of the new house.  The house would be located on a precipice with almost 360-degree views to the horizon and a large boulder blocking views back to the road. A long process of research began with the clients showing us images of houses they found intriguing- mostly contemporary houses that showed a more aggressive formal and spatial language than the mid-century modern homes that have become the de-facto style of the desert southwest.

 

 


 

We looked back at precedents for how architects have dealt with houses located in similar topography and found that generally they either sought to integrate the built work into the landscape, as in the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and later Rudolf Shindler or to hold the architecture aloof from the landscape as in the European modernist tradition of Mies van der Rohe.  While on a completely virgin site, the lightly treading minimalist approach would be preferred, here we decided that the Western American tradition of Land Art would serve as a better starting point, marrying the two tendencies in a tense relationship with the house clawing the ground for purchase while maintaining its otherness. The house would replace the missing mountain that was scraped away, but not as a mountain, but a shadow or negative of the rock; what was found once the rock was removed, a hard glinting obsidian shard.

A concept in place, we began fleshing out the spaces and movement through the house.  We wanted the experience of navigating the house to remind one of traversing the site outside.  The rooms are arranged in a linear sequence from the living room to bedrooms with the kitchen and dining in the middle, all wrapping around an inner courtyard which adds a crucial intermediate space in the entry sequence and a protected exterior space in the harsh climate.

 


 

The dark color of the house interior adds to the primordial cave-like feeling.  During the day, the interior of the house recedes and the views are more pronounced.  At night the house completely dematerializes and the muted lighting and stars outside blend to form an infinite backdrop for contemplation. The project would never have come about without the continued efforts of the entire team.  The design was a collaborative effort between Marc and Michele and the architects.  The patience and dedication of the builder, Avian Rogers, and her subcontractors were crucial to the success of the project.  Everyone who worked on the project knew it was something out of the ordinary and put forth incredible effort to see it completed.

 

© Marc Angeles

 


 

 

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Boxy Kitchen Pavilion (2003) by Maarten Van Severen

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Boxy Kitchen Pavilion (2003) by Maarten Van Severen located in Deurle, Belgium | The Hardt

 

Boxy Kitchen Pavilion (2003) by Maarten Van Severen located in Deurle, Belgium. In 2000, the residents of a nineteenth-century villa with beautiful sight axes and an original interior in Deurle, Maarten Van Severen, asked for an upgrade of their home. With a few accurately balanced interventions the designer picked up the kitchen, work, and living space. Two new windows in the living room also marked his intervention on the outside. They gave the villa a facelift that came across as radical yet integrated.

 


 

Shortly after the completion of this work, the client asked Van Severen to build a new pavilion on the same plot. The building had to be able to combine work, receive and live. Not only would the new pavilion accommodate the activities of a catering service – from preparation to administration – the co-owner also had to stay overnight. Exactly in that order, the different functional spaces follow up within the new volume. Via a service road serving the site on the west side, products are delivered to the frontal façade that is furthest away from the villa. There, bulky doors provide direct access to the cold store. On the inside, the ingredients find their way via the cold store to the kitchen.

 

 


 

Personnel is coming and going, smells and noises fill the room. Behind the kitchen is the reception table, where it is tasted and served. In the same room, someone is working at a desk. Between table and desk grows, the trunk enclosed by a glass tube, an oak. Then follows the living space of the apartment, which is located at the head of the pavilion and therefore has glass walls on two sides. Views in all directions determine the experience value of the entire interior. In the view of the longitudinal axis, the successive functions join together as spatial sequences. Sliding and rotating panels that are sometimes reflective, sometimes translucent, sometimes painted, support this sequence and filter or block the transparency. The views transverse to the longitudinal axis are directed through the interior to the garden. There is the low line of sight from the bath incorporated in the floor. Those who sit in it can look straight through the fireplace to the garden. Van Severen built the pavilion along the southern border of the plot so that the new building does not obstruct the view through the large window in the side wall of the villa. The elongated beam is directed towards the garden as a transparent volume, while on the south-facing rear the roof covering – in silver-colored PVC skin – flows seamlessly into the façade. At the explicit request of the clients, the construction took place with great respect for the environment. No tree grubbed: the oak that was within the expanded contours was incorporated into the whole. That decision determined for a large part the technical approach. To provide the roots of the oak with air and moisture, it was founded on piles. The slope of the site remained unaffected so that the floor slab seems to float above it. A steel structure supports the elongated volume. The shortest side of it is covered in two unequal phases, resulting in two zones on the longitudinal axis.

 


 

Along the closed southern façade are the entrances and smaller service spaces – library, bathroom, hall, cloakroom, stairway zones. The large functional spaces – kitchen, dining room, office, living space – are located on the northern façade. Here, in order not to obstruct the view of the garden, the glass façade was kept as open as possible. The steel grid also determined the window rhythm. The profiles of the window frames were kept as slim as possible so as not to impede the view. This effect, plus the limited thickness of the floor and ceiling package at the windows, creates a lightness that gives the building the status of an object. From the terrace on the south side of the villa, the connection with the pavilion becomes clear: the story that Van Severen started with the large, accurately proportioned steel windows in the rear façade of the villa will be fully rounded off in the garden pavilion. Old and new play adequately and without scruples

 

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https://thehardt.com/architecture/3209-2/

House In Eifukucho (2011) by Upsetters Architects

The Hill House (2012) by Andrew Maynard Architects

 

 


 

The Hardt amangiri resort 4 corners utah architects marwan al sayed wendell burnette and rick joy 1 Sub Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin Architecture Design Landscape  Myles Baldwin Landscape Architecture landscape australia   Image of amangiri resort 4 corners utah architects marwan al sayed wendell burnette and rick joy 1

Amangiri Resort by Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy

Amangiri Resort located in 4 Corners Utah by an all-star squad of architects Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy | The Hardt

 

 

Amangiri Resort located in 4 Corners Utah by an all-star squad of architects Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy | The Hardt

 

Amangiri Resort located in 4 Corners Utah by an all-star squad of architects Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy. Amangiri is located on 243 hectares (600 acres) in Canyon Point, Southern Utah, close to the border with Arizona. The resort is tucked into a protected valley with sweeping views over colorful, stratified rock towards the Grand Staircase – Escalante National Monument. The resort is a 25-minute drive The Hardt amangiri resort 4 corners utah architects marwan al sayed wendell burnette and rick joy0204  Sub Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin Architecture Design Landscape  Myles Baldwin Landscape Architecture landscape australia   Image of amangiri resort 4 corners utah architects marwan al sayed wendell burnette and rick joy0204from the nearest town of Page, Arizona and a 15-minute drive to the shores of LakePowell.  Architecturally, the resort has been designed to blend into the landscape with natural hues, materials, and textures a feature of the design. The structures are commanding and in proportion with the scale of the natural surroundings, yet provide an intimate setting from which to view and appreciate the landscape

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Arrival to the resort is via a winding road that descends into the valley and leads to the central Pavilion. Built around the main swimming pool, the Pavilion embraces a dramatic stone escarpment. Within the Pavilion is the Living Room,  Gallery,  Library,  Dining Room,  Private Dining Room, and Cellar.  Two accommodation wings lead from the Pavilion into the desert: 17 suites are located within the North Wing and another 17 suites together with the Aman Spa are located within the South Wing. Outward views from the resort look over the untouched valley surrounded by lofty bluffs. Amangiri offers 34 suites in total: 13 Desert View Suites, 14 Mesa View Suites, one Terrace Suite, two Pool Suites, two Terrace Pool Suites, the Girijaala Suite and the Amangiri Suite.

 

Entry to each suite is via a private the courtyard that features a Douglas Fir timber screen and includes a dining table, two chairs, and a sculptured light form. A glass wall with a central door opens to a combined bedroom and living area which includes a writing desk and a king-sized bed. Beyond the bed is a sitting area which features a low-set sofa, a coffee table, reading chairs and a side table.  A soaring timber cabinet separates the bedroom and living area from the dressing room and houses a television and combined CD/DVD  player. Concertina glass doors open from the sitting area to a spacious desert lounge that frames the view of the natural landscape beyond. The lounge contains a plinth with resting mattresses and a central fireplace.

 

The adjacent sky-lit dressing room extends the full length of the suite and features an extensive wardrobe with a personal safe and spacious dressing area with twin vanities atop a stone plinth. To one end of the dressing room is a separate toilet room and to the other, a spacious bathroom lined with sage green tiles. The bathroom features twin rain showers and a comfortable soaking tub with uninterrupted views of the landscape.

Design finishes include white stone floors and concrete walls that echo the natural stone of the surrounding landscape.  The furniture features rawhide, natural timbers, and fittings in blackened steel, while light-colored cushions and soft throws add warmth.The Hardt amangiri resort 4 corners utah architects marwan al sayed wendell burnette and rick joy88 Sub Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin Architecture Design Landscape  Myles Baldwin Landscape Architecture landscape australia   Image of amangiri resort 4 corners utah architects marwan al sayed wendell burnette and rick joy88

Photography: Courtesy of Aman Resorts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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The Hardt Guerrero House Alberto Campo Baeza. Photograph by Roland Halbe THE HARDT6 Sub Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin Architecture Design Landscape  Myles Baldwin Landscape Architecture landscape australia   Image of Guerrero House Alberto Campo Baeza. Photograph by Roland Halbe THE HARDT6

Guerrero House (2005) by Alberto Campo Baeza

Guerrero House by Alberto Campo Baeza situated in Cádiz, Spain | The Hardt

 

Guerrero House – Unreal Engine 4 realtime walktrough from Mateusz Klepadło on Vimeo.

 

Guerrero House by Alberto Campo Baeza situated in Cádiz, Spain. Completed in 2005, the central and main axis of the 1,829 ft² (170 m²) home’s entrance is marked by four orange trees, flanked by low walls that hide service areas. The home “is the construction of a luminous shadow. To build a well-balanced house full of light and shade. We built very tall, 26 foot (8 meters) high, walls around a 108 x 60 foot (33 x 18-meter) rectangle and covered the central strip,30 ft x 60 ft (9 x 18 meters.) We raised the ceiling of the 30 x 30 ft (9 x 9 meter) central square to the same height as the 26 foot (8 meters) high outside walls. To fill this central space with shade, we opened it to the front and back, creating 10 feet (3 meters) deep porches that protect these openings from the sun, tempering the light. To either side, bedrooms, and baths. In the front courtyard, the entrance to the house, four orange trees mark the central and main axis, flanked by low walls that hide service areas. In the back courtyard, another four orange trees are similarly aligned. And at the end, carved into the ground, a trough-like pond stretches from side to side. The house is the construction of a luminous shadow.

 

 

© Roland Halbe

 


 

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PA House (2017) by IDIN Architects

PA House (2017) by IDIN Architects located in Thailand | The Hardt

 

PA House (2017) by IDIN Architects located in Thailand. The private house was designed for a small and new settled family. There are 3 bedrooms including one master bedroom and two bedrooms reserving for guest and their child in the future. Not only the bedrooms but there are also 2 more main requirements from the owner which are a great common area for living and dining, where the owners always get together with their friends as the new generation’s lifestyle does, and the privacy, the owner’s most important issue, from the unpleasant surroundings. While the house needs privacy, it still has to be roomy and clear at the same time.

 

 


 

Therefore, the concept design begins with studying the surrounding buildings about their height to outside-in and inside-out view of the house, to fit each function to the site appropriately. In the other hand, the surrounding buildings are not only the conditions but also the assistance to help the architects plan the layout and zoning of this house. In order to achieve such requirements, the wall planes are created for screening out the outside-in view, opening the inside-out view and creating an internal space at the same time. The main area of the house is the common area where owners can have a dinner and take a 180-degree view of the green area through the swimming pool. Each wall plane is intentionally designed to float and locate around the house to define the house’s view and shade out the sunlight getting into the area simultaneously.

 

 

© Ketsiree Wongwan

 


 

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The Hardt Villa Rotonda Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten 1 Sub Tropical Melbourne Garden by Myles Baldwin Architecture Design Landscape  Myles Baldwin Landscape Architecture landscape australia   Image of Villa Rotonda Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten 1

Villa Rotonda (2010) by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten

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Located in Goirle, North Brabant, Netherlands, Villa Rotonda (2010) by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten | The Hardt

 

Located in Goirle, North Brabant, Netherlands, Villa Rotonda (2010) by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten. A striking combination of contemporary traditionalism and artisanal innovation. The swimming pool, sauna, and hot tub are clear indications of extravagance in this living arrangement in Goirle, a district in the region of the city of Tilburg, in the south of the Netherlands. In any case, the solace of this house is offered by these extravagant conveniences, as well as essentially by its building design.

 


 

Manor Rotonda was planned by the youthful designers Pieter and Thomas Bedaux, who are proceeding with the convention of the department in Goirle which was begun in the 1930s by their granddad Jos Bedaux and assumed control by their dad Peer Bedaux. Since the 1950s, the authority has been concentrating on two streams: a contemporary traditionalism and an artisanal innovation. In both territories, security and solace have a huge impact. Starting thereof perspective, the conventional houses with their pitched rooftops and covered windows are not all that not quite the same as the peaceful, conceptual structural planning which the department has additionally been making for a considerable length of time. The living arrangement in Goirle consolidates both headings.

 


 

From the road, the house looks conventional and shut, from the patio nursery it uncovers itself as a transparent space. The conventional look was directed by the zoning arrangement, which indicated a rooftop which would permit the new building to fit in with the provincial climate of Goirle – an environment, by the way, which has been resolved to a critical degree by the work of the granddad and father Bedaux. With the exception of two extensive windows, the house is shut off to the primary road, shielding the inhabitants from the clamor contamination brought about by the movement from the adjacent occupied circuitous. This additionally clarifies the name of the house, Villa Rotonda. As opposed to a reference to Andrea Palladio’s popular manor close to Vicenza, Italy, it is an unexpected discourse on the house’s area by a circuitous crossing point. The water somewhat encompassing the house strengthens its private, fixed off the character.

 

 


 

From the road, the house looks conventional and shut, from the patio nursery it uncovers itself as a transparent space. The conventional look was directed by the zoning arrangement, which indicated a rooftop which would permit the new building to fit in with the provincial climate of Goirle – an environment, by the way, which has been resolved to a critical degree by the work of the granddad and father Bedaux. With the exception of two extensive windows, the house is shut off to the primary road, shielding the inhabitants from the clamor contamination brought about by the movement from the adjacent occupied circuitous. This additionally clarifies the name of the house, Villa Rotonda. As opposed to a reference to Andrea Palladio’s popular manor close to Vicenza, Italy, it is an unexpected discourse on the house’s area by a circuitous crossing point. The water somewhat encompassing the house strengthens its private, fixed off the character.

 


 

The choice to utilize the moderate variation of CS 68 with concealed vents accentuates the dynamic look of this house with its downplayed plan, in which the presence of straightforwardness is not just found in the windows. This profits, in theory, enumerating of the point where the divider meets the rooftop. The naturally worked sliding entryways and windows are a piece of an amazing cluster of home hardware which serves to further expand the solace level effectively inalienable in the structural engineering itself. Every room in the house confronts the extensive greenery enclosure. With the shut-off roadside façade guarding the back of the house, it is conceivable to appreciate both utter security and light, open living. Thusly, with the outline of the house, the two youthful engineers have accomplished an ideal blend of two universes, cutting edge and conventional, in this manner demonstrating that they are deserving of following in the strides of their ancestors in the workplace.

 

Photography is by Michel Kievits

 


 

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