House 0614 (2011) by Simpraxis Architects

House 0614 (2011) by Simpraxis Architects

House 0614 (2011) by Simpraxis Architects located in Nicosia, Lebanon | The Hardt

 

House 0614 (2011) by Simpraxis Architects located in Nicosia, Lebanon. The house designed for a couple with two children is situated in a suburban area of Nicosia that is only recently undergoing development. The square footprint of the house is largely determined by the rectangular shape of the site subtracting the three meters required setback on three sides and allowing for a large yard at the back that faces south. The house attempts to address the dual nature of the largely undeveloped landscape that can be inviting but also intimidating. The box is programmatically divided into two parts. A two-story rectangular box along the east boundary includes bedrooms and a bathroom for the children as well as guest areas, service areas, kitchen, and parking. The remaining void of the double height ‘box’ includes the common areas, the outdoor covered areas on the ground floor and the master bedroom and bath on the second floor.

An intermediary space with glass floor functions as a bridge that connects the master bedroom to the rest of the second floor. The experience of the floating transparent floor, besides physically connecting the two parts of the second floor, introduces an element of autonomy to the parents’ personal space within the bigger void of the house.

 

 


 

A system of glass sliding doors, together with folding metal/wood doors, enclose an outdoor space that connects the interior spaces. A gap on the second floor of the box allows for natural light to enter the courtyard and the interior spaces. A tree shades the interior courtyard in the summer and protects the interior spaces from the summer western sun. Once all glass doors are open the enclosed courtyard and the interior spaces function as one. Opening the exterior folding doors expands the boundary of the space to the edges of the rectangular lot and beyond.

 


 

Opening the folding wooden-clad doors during the winter months and maintaining the glass doors closed, allows for sunshine throughout the day. The deciduous tree situated in the portion of the courtyard open to the sky allows for southern light to warm up the areas located in the north part of the house. Keeping the folding wooden doors closed during the summer and opening the glass sliding doors allows for effective cross-ventilation and passive cooling and also helps to shade the spaces, both indoor and outdoor, from the harsh direct and indirect sunlight. Clearstory, electrically operated windows facilitate ever more the creation of a comfortable environment during summer.

 

 

© Marios Christodoulides, Christos Papantoniou

 


 

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Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau

Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau

Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau located in Beirut, Lebanon | The Hardt

 

Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau located in Beirut, Lebanon. The project is an interior refurbishment of a two floors penthouse for a family of four, located in Wadi Abu Jamil in Beirut Central District. The original arrangement of the penthouse presented a fragmented circulation between its two floors with poor spatial interaction and a narrow main foyer. The most significant spatial intervention was the introduction of a double-height space at the center of the house, reorganizing around it the once fragmented realms of living areas, work areas, storage, and bedrooms.


Defined by a clad wooden skin, such element features a widened entrance that transitions smoothly to the reception and brings back to its center the staircase as a feature element.The stairs become a floating structure within such space, suspended from the ceiling through vertical steel profiles that emphasize its lightness and its detachment from skin and slab as if it’s floating in the middle of the double height space.

 

 

 


The wooden skin’s form reconciles the different misalignments and provides a curvilinear horizontal and vertical continuity between the widened lobby and adjacent spaces on both floors. This skin integrates doors to adjoining rooms, storage closets, see-through cutouts and incorporated lighting.It turns the corner to maintain the same treatment for the inner living room wall. Steel profiles stick out of the skin to create door handles and shelves. Complementing the minimal materiality, a playful custom-made steel and copper lighting fixture hangs from the double height reception.


In contrast with its wooden skin core, the remaining surfaces of the penthouse are white paint for walls, white marble for floors and white steel for the staircase. The different rooms are designed with a recurrent system of having the exterior walls painted white and the internal walls with different playful wood cladding to incorporate doors, library, and closets. During its development and execution phases, the project became an exploration of the wide array of means for both designing and fabricating architecture on the light on local craftsmanship constraints.

 

© Wissam Chaaya

 

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Tahan Villa (2013) by BLANKPAGE Architects

Tahan Villa (2013) by BLANKPAGE Architects

Located in Kfour, Lebanon, Tahan Villa (2013) by BLANKPAGE Architects | The Hardt

 

Located in Kfour, Lebanon, Tahan Villa (2013) by BLANKPAGE Architects. The position of the house is optimized to enhance the view at a maximum while respecting the sloped nature of the terrain. It was conceived as an architectural adaptation of the rocks that characterized the surrounding scenery. In essence, it is a massive volume, seemingly floating in the landscape. The facade is clad with sliding stone panels that resemble the texture of the rocks. It rests on a transparent box which is shaped by a series of platforms that adapt to the topography. These platforms form a transition, from a stepped access, that links the street level to the house. On the roof of the house, there is a light steel pergola which is finished with terracotta louvers and contains a painting studio surrounded by a roof terrace. The final outcome resulted in a prismatic stone volume within an existing landscape. The house can be read as a subversion of the traditional Lebanese village house.

 

 

© Ieva Saudargaitė

 


 

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Amchit Residence by BLANKPAGE Architects

Amchit Residence by BLANKPAGE Architects

Amchit Residence by BLANKPAGE Architects located in Amchit, Lebanon | The Hardt

 

Amchit Residence by BLANKPAGE Architects located in Amchit, Lebanon. The 4,200 ft² ( 390 m²) home was conceived as a layering of decks, the beach house seeks to maximize its relationship with the sea through a visual and compositional celebration of horizontality in general and the Mediterranean horizon in particular. Conceived as a layering of decks, the beach house seeks to maximize its relationship with the sea through a visual and compositional celebration of horizontality in general and the Mediterranean horizon in particular. The slabs are held by a minimal steel structure made of equally sized square columns on a regular module of 2.55m, as well as a discreet glass enclosure.

 

 

 


 

Given the inclined nature of the site, the house is approached by a car on the street level just below the upper deck. At the external landing entrance, the circulation interconnects the three levels of the house. The upper platform contains the master bedroom that opens up on an elongated lap pool and expansive sun deck. The middle platform houses two bedrooms and a family living. Finally, the lower deck serves as a reception area that extends outdoors towards the sea through an infinity pool as well as a staircase to the shore. In addition to the inner circulation core, a smooth promenade formed by a system of external ramps and staircases connects the platforms, linking the various levels of the rocky landscape that stretches between the street all the way to the sea.

 

© Ieva Saudargaitė

 


 

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