Privathaus (2011) by Wild Bär Heule

Privathaus (2011) by Wild Bär Heule located in Zollikon, Zurich, Switzerland. The precisely placed empty place in the center of the house. Two U-shaped ground planes, rotated by ninety degrees, form a three-dimensional object and are stacked on top of each other in such a way that the courtyard is placed in the joint of the projectile. Each path through the house leads past the farm with the acacia, which thus always provides orientation. The ground floor opens to the south to the garden, while the upper floor is oriented to a terrace in the west. Concrete slabs and panels limit the room at selected points – window openings are created where vertical and horizontal surfaces meet.

Findlay Residence by Splyce Design

Findlay Residence by Splyce Design

Findlay Residence by Splyce Design, located on a flat, irregular shaped site in North Vancouver, Canada. The house was designed for a young active family of four. The principal living spaces of the home are organized around a beautiful two story exterior void within the main volume of the building. Planted with bamboo and glazed on either side, this cutout serves to create separation between spaces, without fully disengaging them from one another. On the main floor, the bamboo garden subtly divides the kitchen/dining space from the living area- a dynamic that serves the family well with their busy and differing schedules. On the upper floor, the tall bamboo from below screens the master bedroom sleeping and change area from its adjoining bathroom. These two spaces are connected with a glazed bridge.

 

Light and shadow animate the white walls by the passing sun as it enters through the large skylight above the central staircase. Windows and doors are calibrated to capture the natural light and views to the garden and mountains beyond. On the building’s west elevation, large sliding glass doors activate the adjacent patios allowing space to flow from inside to out, and all at once the space becomes pavilion-like with its ample porosity. In contrast, the street elevation on the north reads more formally with its cedar and concrete walls stretching out horizontally across the site and into the landscape. Due to site constraints, there is no usable back yard, so the front serves as a playing field for the client’s two boys.

A simple interior palette consisting of concrete floors, white lacquered and oak cabinets and white walls serve to strengthen the clarity and purity of the spaces and allows the vibrancy of the the natural environment and landscape features to pervade.

Photos: Ivan Hunter Photography

House for Installation (2014) by Jun Murata JAM

House for Installation (2014) by Jun Murata JAM

Located in Kashiwara, Osaka Prefecture, Japan, House for Installation (2014) by Jun Murata JAM. The opening door has detail similar to the storage core is installed on the middle of corridor, which leads as service circulation to the kitchen. Staircase is extended so as to be perpendicular thereto, the amphidromous flow space is provided. The south face part – previously, there was Japanese-style rooms – is converted to one large room which faces a minimum space as white blank. It is used as living, dining and Japanese-style room, prepared various lighting patterns.

 

Roduit House Transformation (2005) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Roduit House Transformation (2005) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Located in Chamoson, Switzerland, Roduit House Transformation (2005) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes. This building was constructed in stages from 1814 onwards and was used as a rural house. It is made up of three adjacent areas on different levels. On the ground floor it is crossed by an access way which indicates the presence of a former right of way to the next-door building.

The imposing proximity of the rocks and its stone construction allows the structure to blend seamlessly into it’s surroundings. The renovation seeks to maintain and reinforce this character, by emphasizing the existing stone structure while using concrete for the parts to be replaced, in order to create a completely mineral feel to the entire project

 

 

The exterior volume has not been changed. The stone has been preserved and lined inside with an insulating layer of concrete based on foamed recycled glass (misapor). This insulating lining forms the new load-bearing structure, and reinforces the old stone walls while providing thermal insulation. The parts of the façade formerly constructed of timber weatherboarding have been replaced by a monolithic wall of insulating concrete with formwork which reproduces the former texture of the timber.

The window apertures have been retained and some larger windows added in order to let more natural light into the main interior spaces and to provide views over the surrounding landscape. These new windows are flush with the exterior in order to minimize their impact on the volume of the building, as well as to emphasize and make good use of the substantial thickness of the walls.

In harmony with the exterior, the interior is formed from unrefined mineral materials, with its natural stone, exposed concrete and polished screed floors. Only a few elements, such as the kitchen or the sanitary fittings, are in contrast to this character

Villa 131 (2016) by Bracket Design Studio

Villa 131 (2016) by Bracket Design Studio

Villa 131 (2016) by Bracket Design Studio located in Isfahan, Iran | The Hardt

 

Villa 131 (2016) by Bracket Design Studio located in Isfahan, Iran. During the development of the city, beautiful gardens, beautiful gardens have turned into the streets or highways of the neighborhood. In this change, population migrates to the city skirt and the border towns grows day by day. The client of this project which has been located in one of the border towns of Isfahan had decided to live in the garden as well.

 

 

 

© Farshid Nasrabadi

 


 

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Island House (2012) by Peter Rose + Partners

Island House (2012) by Peter Rose + Partners

Situated in Edgartown, United States, Island House (2012) by Peter Rose + Partners. Nestled in the richly wooded grounds of a narrow strip of land on the island of Chappaquiddick near Edgartown, Massachusetts, this single‐family residence is part of a collection of environment‐ and landscape‐centric interventions that blur the boundaries between structures and landscape, and between inside and outside. Comprised of four structures – a 6,300 SF main residence, a 630 SF garage, a 270 SF storage shed, and a 130 SF boat house – the site is bounded by the ocean to the west and by a well‐protected, shallow bay to the east. The project replaced a house, garage/guest house, and a long driveway running through a meadow, previously located on the site

The site strategy involved moving the road from the middle of an existing meadow to a new location, winding through an oak and pine forest (without damaging any of the existing trees), and terminating it in a hidden courtyard – bounded by the garage, a utility shed, and the forest edge. In addition to providing a remarkable process of entry through the trees, the result of the new road location is that the cars and road, for the most part, disappear completely from view, altering both the scale and atmosphere of the site dramatically.

 

 

Located at the extreme edges of the site, on the water in both cases, the main house and boat house are carefully and strategically located, both in section and plan, to optimize the experience of being in and using these structures, while minimizing their environmental and visual impact on the site. The boathouse, sitting on four thin concrete columns, was stealthily sited among pine trees, and constructed without touching even a branch. The house works in plan and section so as to offer remarkable views of Nantucket and the sunrise over Cape Pogue Bay to the east, and of the ocean and Edgartown and sunset over water to the west. Locust trees on the western side of the house screen it from the late afternoon sun and provide camouflage as well. The house is low to the ground, clad in sealed, unpainted wood to naturally weather to recede over time into the surrounding landscape. One intention of the project is that it be as close to invisible in the larger landscape as possible.

To minimize the environmental impact of the new construction, the house deploys a suite of sustainability strategies that not only conserve energy, reduce waste, and save money, but also promotes intimate encounters between the house’s guests and its surroundings. The structure’s unassuming cedar‐clad façade belies a sophisticated building envelope, which utilizes rigid insulation and other strategies to withstand the hardiest of nor’easters. Where the façade lacks wood, it contains fully operable glass windows, created by a local craftsman who has developed a technique which allows corner windows to open completely, and large panels of glass to slide open along the exterior façade of the building, leaving nothing but the view and the ocean breezes. Strategically placed to encourage natural ventilation, these calibrated window openings work in concert with the structure’s radiant heating and cooling to modulate the residence’s living spaces and vastly reduce the size and operating cost of HVAC equipment. The residence’s southern exposure floods the interior with natural light, maximizing solar heat gain and minimizing electrical consumption, while green roofs – covered in natural sea grasses – provide greater thermal performance and roof insulation, improve air quality and biodiversity, manage rainwater, and reduce noise. The landscape was likewise considered in terms of sustainability using local species, and an irrigation system that uses water collected on green roofs and stored in a large cistern.

© Matthew Snyder

The Hardt

The Hardt

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