The Hardt house 24 by park and associates32 House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates Architecture Courtyard Design Interior Design Minimal Modern  Singapore Shadows patterns Park + Associates lighting Edward Hendricks   Image of house 24 by park and associates32

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates

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House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates located in Singapore | The Hardt

 

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates located in Singapore. In a usual circumstance, the front of the house is the most important – not in our case. House 24 is sited on a triangular plot, a constraint that we took on as an opportunity to really engage with the siting and planning of the house – to achieve a meaningful footprint that actualized the client’s spatial, functional, and privacy requirement. Moreover, the site adjoins a lushly landscaped state land that we endeavored to take advantage of at every available opportunity and every habitable space. As such, we turned the house away from the main road and neighboring houses, and instead, have the living spaces open out to the mature greenery beyond. The result is amassing comprising of two blocks which, when combined, define a V-shaped patio on the first floor that becomes the focal point of common activities and entertainment, borrowing views from the surrounding greenery.

 

 


 

The courtyard screen fronting the street is an exercise in rethinking the conventional entry sequence of residential dwellings, and an exploration in creating a more layered and sequential experience. It is experienced almost as a ritual space – serene and tranquil – marking the transition between the public and private. It was also an opportunity to explore what timber craftsmanship might mean in contemporary architecture, and we envisioned the screen to be a well-crafted element with a modern aesthetic and detailing. It eventually manifested itself as a refined and rhythmic facade, drawing attention to its delicate scale even as a structure that is over 8m high. A delightful pattern of light and shadow play out over the course of each day whilst allowing sunlight to filter in and natural air to stream in, creating a relaxing ambiance that reinforces the client’s desire to live in a home that reflected its tropical locality.

 

© Edward Hendricks

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects::

 


 

The Hardt Light Walls House mA style Architects 9 House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates Architecture Courtyard Design Interior Design Minimal Modern  Singapore Shadows patterns Park + Associates lighting Edward Hendricks   Image of Light Walls House mA style Architects 9

Light Walls House (2013) by mA-style Architects

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Light Walls House (2013) by mA-style Architects located in Toyo kawa, Japan | The Hardt

 

 

Light Walls House (2013) by mA-style Architects located in Toyo kawa, Japan. The site is in a shady location where a two-story neighboring house closely stands on the south side, and even the shade and shadow on the path intensify the impression of darkness. Therefore, the design intended to create a space with uniformly distributed light by adjusting the way of letting daylight in, and the way of directing the light. By taking into consideration the space for the residents, the functions for a living, and the relationship with the surrounding environment, the creation of a diversity and richness in the house were intended by controlling the concept of light.

 


 

Along the edges of the 9.1m square roof, skylights are made, as if creating an outline, in order to provide sunlight. The roof beams narrow the sunlight, and the slightly angled clapboard interior walls with laminated wood reflect and diffuse the light. As a result, soft and uniformly distributed light is created and surrounds the entire space. Along the outline of lighting, workspaces such as a kitchen, bathroom, and study are arranged. Private spaces such as bedrooms and storage are allocated into four boxes. The path-like spaces created between them are public spaces. Each box attempts to balance within a large spatial volume. Light coupled with the rhythm of scale raises the possibilities of the living space for the residents.

 

 


 

Considering each box as a house, the empty spaces in between can be seen as paths or plazas, and remind us of a small town enclosed in the light. The empty spaces, which cause shortening or elongating of distances between people, are intermediate spaces for the residents, as well as intermediate spaces that are connected to the outside when the corridor is open, and these are the image of a social structure that includes a variety of individuals. In terms of a natural component, in which light is softened by small manipulations, and of a social component, in which a town is created in the house, this house turned out to be a courtyard house of light where new values are discovered.

 

© Kai Nakamura

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically RElated Projects:

 


 

The Hardt Scorpions Retreat Infused with Cycladic Details in Mykonos. Gree232 House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates Architecture Courtyard Design Interior Design Minimal Modern  Singapore Shadows patterns Park + Associates lighting Edward Hendricks   Image of Scorpions Retreat Infused with Cycladic Details in Mykonos. Gree232

Scorpions Retreat by Michael Schickinger

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Scorpions Retreat by Michael Schickinger of Lambs&Lions located in Mykonos, Greece | The Hardt

 

Scorpions Retreat by Michael Schickinger of Lambs&Lions located in Mykonos, Greece. Situated on the picturesque island of Mykonos, Greece, Scorpios by Michael Schickinger of Lambs&Lions is an exclusive getaway that celebrates beach culture. The project was developed in close collaboration with interior designer Annabell Kutucu to merge natural textures with functional contemporary amenities: “We tried to infuse Scorpios with the classic materials and construction tactics found in Cycladic architecture to root it in its internet site and context. It was then peppered with collected objects discovered by Michael and Annabell on their travels”, the designers stated. Inspired by the contrasts revealed by the island of Mykonos (mainly its rocky, hot landscape juxtaposed by the invigorating the blue sea), the project tea envisioned a holistic retreat: “We wanted the place to be a stage that invites all aspects of Mykonos life but often with a concentrate on leisure. The style is inspired by natural components that set a laid back, down to earth and comfy backdrop for all the various activities that will take place there. It is a spot that simultaneously excites the senses and calms the soul.”

 

 

Photos by Carolin Saage

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

Clover House (2015) by R.C.TECH

Tramuntana House by Perretta Arquitectura

House in Salento (2014) by Iosa Ghini Associati

 


 

The Hardt IMG 4060 House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates Architecture Courtyard Design Interior Design Minimal Modern  Singapore Shadows patterns Park + Associates lighting Edward Hendricks   Image of IMG 4060

House in Nagoya (2009) by SUPPOSE DESIGN OFFICE

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House in Nagoya (2009) by SUPPOSE DESIGN OFFICE Co., Ltd. located in Moriyama, Nagoya, Japan | The Hardt

 

House in Nagoya (2009) by SUPPOSE DESIGN OFFICE Co., Ltd. located in Moriyama, Nagoya, Japan. This Nagoya home features rooms designed for plants. This home is built on a small, narrow plot surrounded by other houses, making the location less than ideal. Responding to the client’s desire to have a vibrant garden we suggested a design featuring a room for plants, a “garden room” in other words. Essentially, in this home the garden, which usually exists in the so-called exterior, is incorporated into the interior as landscaping to surround the tenant’s living space.

 

 


 

It was our intention to treat rooms and gardens as equivalent and make the relationship between inside and out closer, by creating a design featuring this garden-like room so that things normally decorating a room such as art, books, and furnishings would in a way almost be thrust into an exterior space. Rather than a design that begins to grow stale as soon as it is completed, through this design featuring the constantly changing and vibrant “garden room” we hope that the ttenant’sdaily lives will be richer than before. Using this design as a starting point, we hope that words such as garden and landscape that had only been used for exteriors can begin to take on new and varied meanings, bringing vibrant and beautiful scenery into the interior of homes as well, and make architectural aesthetics more and more diverse/

 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

 

The Hardt House 0614 Simpraxis Architects 3 House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates Architecture Courtyard Design Interior Design Minimal Modern  Singapore Shadows patterns Park + Associates lighting Edward Hendricks   Image of House 0614 Simpraxis Architects 3

House 0614 (2011) by Simpraxis Architects

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House 0614 (2011) by Simpraxis Architects located in Nicosia, Lebanon | The Hardt

 

House 0614 (2011) by Simpraxis Architects located in Nicosia, Lebanon. The house designed for a couple with two children is situated in a suburban area of Nicosia that is only recently undergoing development. The square footprint of the house is largely determined by the rectangular shape of the site subtracting the three meters required setback on three sides and allowing for a large yard at the back that faces south. The house attempts to address the dual nature of the largely undeveloped landscape that can be inviting but also intimidating. The box is programmatically divided into two parts. A two-story rectangular box along the east boundary includes bedrooms and a bathroom for the children as well as guest areas, service areas, kitchen, and parking. The remaining void of the double height ‘box’ includes the common areas, the outdoor covered areas on the ground floor and the master bedroom and bath on the second floor.

An intermediary space with glass floor functions as a bridge that connects the master bedroom to the rest of the second floor. The experience of the floating transparent floor, besides physically connecting the two parts of the second floor, introduces an element of autonomy to the parents’ personal space within the bigger void of the house.

 

 


 

A system of glass sliding doors, together with folding metal/wood doors, enclose an outdoor space that connects the interior spaces. A gap on the second floor of the box allows for natural light to enter the courtyard and the interior spaces. A tree shades the interior courtyard in the summer and protects the interior spaces from the summer western sun. Once all glass doors are open the enclosed courtyard and the interior spaces function as one. Opening the exterior folding doors expands the boundary of the space to the edges of the rectangular lot and beyond.

 


 

Opening the folding wooden-clad doors during the winter months and maintaining the glass doors closed, allows for sunshine throughout the day. The deciduous tree situated in the portion of the courtyard open to the sky allows for southern light to warm up the areas located in the north part of the house. Keeping the folding wooden doors closed during the summer and opening the glass sliding doors allows for effective cross-ventilation and passive cooling and also helps to shade the spaces, both indoor and outdoor, from the harsh direct and indirect sunlight. Clearstory, electrically operated windows facilitate ever more the creation of a comfortable environment during summer.

 

 

© Marios Christodoulides, Christos Papantoniou

 


 

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The Hardt Japan House N 2008 by Sou Fujimoto.0 2880x1800 House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates Architecture Courtyard Design Interior Design Minimal Modern  Singapore Shadows patterns Park + Associates lighting Edward Hendricks   Image of Japan House N 2008 by Sou Fujimoto.0 2880x1800

House N (2008) by Sou Fujimoto

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[Japanese Collection] Episode 5: House N by Sou Fujimoto – 2008 from Vincent.Hecht on Vimeo.

 

Located in Oita, Japan House N (2008) by Sou Fujimoto | The Hardt

 

Located in Oita, Japan House N (2008) by Sou Fujimoto. The house itself is comprised of three shells of progressive size nested inside one another. The outermost shell covers the entire premises, creating a covered, semi-indoor garden. The second shell encloses a limited space inside the covered outdoor space. The third shell creates a smaller interior space. Residents build their life inside this gradation of the domain. A home for two plus a dog. The house itself is comprised of three shells of progressive size nested inside one another. The outermost shell covers the entire premises, creating a covered, semi-indoor garden. The second shell encloses a limited space inside the covered outdoor space. The third shell creates a smaller interior space. Residents build their life inside this gradation of the domain.

 

 


 

I have always had doubts about streets and houses being separated by a single wall, and wondered what a gradation of rich domain accompanied by various senses of distance between streets and houses might be a possibility, such as a place inside the house that is fairly near the street; a place that is a bit far from the street, and a place far off the street, in secure privacy. That is why life in this house resembles living among the clouds. A distinct boundary is nowhere to be found, except for a gradual change in the domain. One might say that an ideal architecture is an outdoor space that feels like the indoors and an indoor space that feels like the outdoors. In a nested structure, the inside is invariably the outside and vice versa. My intention was to make an architecture that is not about space nor about form but simply about expressing the riches of what are `between` houses and streets.

 

 


 

Three nested shells eventually mean infinite nesting because the whole world is made up of infinite nesting. And here are only three of them that are given barely visible shape. I imagined that the city and the house are no different from one another in the essence, but are just different approaches to a continuum of a single subject, or different expressions of the same thing- an undulation of a primordial space where humans dwell. This is a presentation of an ultimate house in which everything from the origins of the world to a specific house is conceived together under a single method.

 

 

 

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The Hardt IDIN Architects 1241 House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates Architecture Courtyard Design Interior Design Minimal Modern  Singapore Shadows patterns Park + Associates lighting Edward Hendricks   Image of IDIN Architects 1241

PA House (2017) by IDIN Architects

PA House (2017) by IDIN Architects located in Thailand | The Hardt

 

PA House (2017) by IDIN Architects located in Thailand. The private house was designed for a small and new settled family. There are 3 bedrooms including one master bedroom and two bedrooms reserving for guest and their child in the future. Not only the bedrooms but there are also 2 more main requirements from the owner which are a great common area for living and dining, where the owners always get together with their friends as the new generation’s lifestyle does, and the privacy, the owner’s most important issue, from the unpleasant surroundings. While the house needs privacy, it still has to be roomy and clear at the same time.

 

 


 

Therefore, the concept design begins with studying the surrounding buildings about their height to outside-in and inside-out view of the house, to fit each function to the site appropriately. In the other hand, the surrounding buildings are not only the conditions but also the assistance to help the architects plan the layout and zoning of this house. In order to achieve such requirements, the wall planes are created for screening out the outside-in view, opening the inside-out view and creating an internal space at the same time. The main area of the house is the common area where owners can have a dinner and take a 180-degree view of the green area through the swimming pool. Each wall plane is intentionally designed to float and locate around the house to define the house’s view and shade out the sunlight getting into the area simultaneously.

 

 

© Ketsiree Wongwan

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

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