Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão

Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão

Asher 8:14 am 8:22 am

Located in Avaré, Brazil, Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão | The Hardt

 

Located in Avaré, Brazil, Ownerless House nº 01 (2015) by Vão. The Ownerless House nº 01 is the first of three contiguous lands bought by the client with the intent of building investment houses in Avaré, a city in the interior of São Paulo. The single-family housing projects usually turn to desires and particularities of the clients but in this case, the client being only an intermediary to the future resident, the program and space should be flexible enough to accommodate the most diverse families dynamics. Get at the link in bio to check the rest of the project. The entire project was designed not as an object but as a route back to the interior with alternating open and closed spaces where natural light and reflections change according to the time and the season. Viewed externally, the house presents itself as a sculpted recess into the built mass, where the leaning red wall directs the perspective to the beginning of the journey.

 

 


 

The living, dining and kitchen areas are spread out over a courtyard located in the center of the plan which, surrounded by large panels of glass, dilutes the limits by integrating them visually. Both the patio and its extension, a lowered floor of hydraulic tiles, are covered by a continuous pergola. These pergola elements were prefabricated individually on the bed and later assembled in order to facilitate assembly and save on shapes and struts. This technique was rescued from studies of the work of the Brazilian architect Rino Levi, where the architect uses the prefabricated elements of concrete in residences in the capital to create light entrances in the middle of the slab.

 

© Pedro Kok

 


 

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Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects

Asher 7:48 pm 7:48 pm

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia | The Hardt

 

Blairgowrie Back Beach (2013) by Wolveridge Architects situated in Blairgowrie VIC, Australia. The clients for this project approached us around Easter in 2011. They are a young family from the city who had purchased this terrific sloping allotment just five minutes’ walk from back beach along Bass Strait. The landform was dominated by an awkward contour and it was clear that the site was halfway up a dune. The block to the west was the top of the dune and the vacant block to the east was the bottom. There was native vegetation, but it was sporadic and insignificant. We were briefed to provide a family home that would give plenty of outdoor space and play area for the kids and their friends, but most importantly the brief insisted that the feel of the house be quite divorced from reminders of life in the city. We studied the landform and we studied the planning requirements. We then prepared a building envelope, placing the dwelling as far to the rear (south) of the lot as possible, providing a terrific expanse of open space to the north. By the time we pushed the form back, it was significantly elevated.

 

As the founding materials are sand, we undertook a major rethink of the landform and the site’s contours by excavating under the dwelling area to create a large undercroft and lower ground floor rumpus area and used that fill to create a north facing quadrangle at the upper level. The result is an apparent single story, low slung dwelling on arrival. A further challenge contemplated the public aspect. The road is located north of the site, therefore a driveway for car parking and arrivals needed to consider how we might plan to make this open space private. We employed a permeable but physical barrier dissecting the public and private aspects of the dwelling. The form of the barrier, a series of free-standing steel sheets with 100mm gaps exists as a sculptural element in the landscape, evoking images of the found object. Access to the dwelling is external, via a garden path defined by a further device, a line of pillars constructed from rammed earth also emerging as objects in the landscape, seemingly molded by the conditions over time. This element clearly defines the public and private realms, yet provides crossovers and transitional spaces in the form of a sandpit, an outdoor shower area, and landscape planting zones. The dwelling itself is conceived over four main modules. Two main living zones separated by a services zone which is located directly over the rumpus room below. The fourth module is the semi roofed external living area, linking the dwelling interior with the landscape. The clients embraced a robust approach to the design of the dwelling. The plan form is rectilinear, with hallways wide enough for kids to ride their bikes. A second linking bbq deck completes the circuit. The materials are generally recycled timbers, with blackened plywood walls, a black ceiling which encourages the enjoyment of light and the externally framed views of the landscape. The bathrooms are glossy heat treated mild steel which reflects the color of the mosaic tiled floors and the shafts of light from the skylights. At night, the sheets imbue a warmth in the reflection of incandescent light.

 

 


 

One of the owners grew up in Eltham, a rural bushland retreat east of the city in a house designed by Alistair Knox. The imagery portrayed by the client of a childhood memory growing up in a Knox dwelling had a significant impact on the project. We considered the use of breeze block and concrete block to provide reminders and links back to notions of the surf clubhouse. Through the development of the design, these elements became more refined with the use of rammed earth and the implementation of laser cut screens employing one of the common motifs of the breeze block.

 

 

© Derek Swalwell

 


 

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Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH Architects

Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH Architects

Asher 10:27 pm 10:27 pm

Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH architects located in Sonnesgade 11, Aarhus C, Denmark | The Hardt

 

Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH architects located in Sonnesgade 11, Aarhus C, Denmark. As the city of Aarhus prepares for 2017, a number of urban districts are being transformed from industry to modern city districts. One of the main cultural venues in 2017 will be Godsbanen – a new lively and cultural district on the old freight terminal area. The new mixed building by SLETH is situated nearby Godsbanen and reflects the transformation from industry to the lively cultural urban district. The starting point for the design of the new office building is an ambition to reuse and rethink spatial and material quality on the former industrial site. The new building is directly grounded on the original underground industrial constructions, which acts as the building’s foundation.

 


 

The building consists of 3 stacked layers of 50 meters long office floors supported by a core wall. Underneath the office floors, where the sloping terrain defines an opening, the restaurant is located facing the street. The parking garage and a wine retailer is located under the sloping landscape. The building has a high degree of flexibility and interaction between the floors, which enhances the meeting situations between different users of the building. The individual floors are open, flexible working environments with the service functions integrated as a single architectural element in the eastern facade of the building.

 

 

Around the building, the sloped asphalt terrain is forming the outdoor areas for terraces, bikes, and gardens. The building´s expression is a collage of elements reflecting the surroundings with 6 facades creating a dialogue with the mixed vague context. The project itself is a 1:1 realization of the architecture and challenges of the office SLETH as both landowners, developer, and architects – based on the potential of Sonnesgade. Product Description. The building features a large range of standard industrial materials: glass, steel, concrete. As a contrast to the hard industrial materials, the custom-made doors and furniture (both inside and outside) are done in oak and similar warm materials. 

 

© Rasmus Hjortshøj / C O A S T  

 


 

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LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso

LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso

Asher 12:28 pm 12:33 pm

LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso located in Manuel López Cotilla, Col del Valle Centro, México City, Mexico | The Hardt

 

LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso located in Manuel López Cotilla, Col del Valle Centro, México City, Mexico. The building LC710 is located in a residential area in the center of ¨Colonia del Valle¨ in Mexico City. The site has a rectangular form, with a narrow front of 10 meters facing the street and 32 meters in depth. This proportion and the east-west orientation resulted in a compositional scheme which parts from three volumes interleaved with three ¨Patios¨ /voids.

 


 

The diagonal connection between these two program areas allows each unit to take advantage of the first-floor ¨patios¨ and the gardens on the rooftop so that each unit has its own private exterior area that merges with the interior space. Six housing units make up the interior of these volumes through two different typologies. Within the first two volumes, the same four units develop, in which the social area is on the first one facing the street and the private areas are on the second one, linked between the circulation core, evident in the intermediate ¨patios¨/voids. In the third volume, two different units take part, each one consisting of two superimposed levels, that also merge with the exterior spaces in a more intimate and silent atmosphere.

 

 


 

The two materials used are concrete, with a color aggregate, and steel. Finding in both good aging and low maintenance. Their use not only seeks to exalt their structural characteristics but also to generate a good atmosphere through their sensorial qualities.

 

© Rafael Gamo

 


 

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House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk

House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk

Asher 11:08 am 11:08 am

House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk located in Tigre, Argentina | The Hardt

 

House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk located in Tigre, Argentina. The client – a medium-scale construction company – carried out a market study on the housing demands of the average socio-economic class in the northern area of Greater Buenos Aires. When finding scarce in the commercial offer of houses of constructive and architectural quality -for which there is a great demand-, he decides to commission the Study the design of a prototype of housing capable of being replicated: the Casa 2HL.

 

The housing commissioned would have to be configured in a single plant. It had to adapt to lots of medium dimensions (17 to 20 m wide by 35 to 40 m deep approximately) and its footage could not exceed 170 m² total. The program -established by the client- should respond to the needs of a family type: a social area composed of a living-dining-kitchen, a master bedroom served by a bathroom en suite, two secondary bedrooms with shared bathroom, local service, solarium, pool, and barbeque.

 

 


 

In response to these requirements, the Study proposes a dwelling contained in a pure prism organized on a modular grid of 1×1 m, of lateral en-suite mostly paraments and open to the front and the quiet part of the building. The distribution of the spaces around a central patio was proposed, which would not only help to illuminate the interior circulations but also -for its plant layout- to generate cross ventilation through all the premises of the house. The selection of materials was made with the intention of prioritizing the control of costs and their speed and constructive practicality. Instead of the traditional exposed concrete used in our homes, we used the masonry of load-bearing hollow brick; and instead of the smoothed cement floor, it was decided to coat them with 1×1 m plates of cement-like termination porcellanite.

 

In order to preserve the privacy of the front bedrooms -without these losing the views to the outside- and to protect them from the direct incidence of the sun, an artifact was constituted by vertical shutters and a hardwood pergola, structured by profiles of double steel T. A similar resource was used to create a gallery in the quiet part of the building that served as an expansion to the master bedroom and the social area. With the purpose of emphasizing the luminosity and spaciousness of their spaces dimensions, we suggest a chromatically clear interior, while for the exterior we proposed a darker finish, able to dialogue without competition with its natural environment. The first house of the series was built in 2016 in the neighborhood of La Comarca (neighbor to Nordelta) in the Tigre Party of the Province of Buenos Aires.

 


 

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