Mountain Cabin (2011) by Marte.Marte Architekten

Mountain Cabin (2011) by Marte.Marte Architekten

Mountain Cabin (2011) by Marte.Marte Architekten, located in Laterns, Austria | The Hardt

 

Mountain Cabin (2011) by Marte.Marte Architekten, located in Laterns, Austria. At the edge of a wooded ravine, beneath the imposing wooden house of the Catholic Community of Sisters, the small tower building rises from the steep hillside. Striking and modest in appearance, it stretches up out of a small hollow situated on a narrow path along the edge of the forest. The only change made to the hillside is the driveway and the terrain has been left in its original form. Fitting into the landscape as if it were a barn, the building, which is a fine example of the homogeneous use of materials, in this case, carefully hewn rough concrete, stands out against the meadow green and winter white. Its ashy-gray color only contrasts slightly with the heavy oak front doors and the anthracite-colored handrails blend in with the branches of the surrounding forest. As if they were punched into the walls, the square windows of different sizes are spread out across the walls, and their full effect is only achieved at the corners.

 


 

The integration of the outer surfaces requested by the client is a kind of artifice. At the entry level, which is accessible via a flight a steps, the structure narrows down to two supporting corner columns, which not only provides guests with the unique opportunity to look through the building while at the same time enjoying a panorama view of the surrounding landscape, the whole time protected from the elements, but also lends the entrance a sense of significance. Inside the column, a spiral staircase connects the living area on the upper level with the two more private areas on the lower level, where the bedrooms and relaxation areas are interlocked like a puzzle. Semantically speaking, this gesture of the tower creates archetypes of fortified structures and abstract computer figures in your mind’s eye, making the tower seem familiar and strange at one and the same time.

 


 

Inside, the openings punched into the double-walled concrete shell are transformed into framed landscape paintings by wide, matte solid oak window frames that do not take up much wall space. These framed windows direct the guest’s attention to the prominent mountain chain, the gentle slopes, and the dense forest grove. Besides the raw concrete surfaces and the untreated oak floors, doors and fixtures, the black metal surfaces complement the harmonious, austere combination of materials. The client and architects haven’t built a flimsy holiday house, but instead a place of retreat that will remain standing for generations, despite any forthcoming changes of climate and landscape.

 

© Marc Lins

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


Evans House (2014) by A4ESTUDIO

Evans House (2014) by A4ESTUDIO

 

Located in Tunuyán, Argentina, Evans House (2014) by A4ESTUDIO. The vineyard landscape with the Andes Mountains is subtle, we must rise over the vegetation line to get the views of the valley and the Andes mountains. The project is a prism that sits in a basement. The natural landscape of Uco`s Valley, framed by the Andes, gets culturalized with the vineyards plots. It is extensive. It invites us to contemplate, to breathe … to stay …

 

Working in such context is a challenge, but a great responsibility as well. The project resulting from this process should meet the spirit of this natural background, be part of it …

The project is designed with the logic of the hollowed trunk. From the inside, space concentrates the west and east views. The exterior coated in rusty metal dialogues with the cultural landscape of vineyards … while the inside is coated in natural wood.
The basement is built with local river stones, their colors dialogue with the mineral and arid natural landscape.

 
 

 
 On top of the basement, the house arranges the diurnal areas, placing the viewer in a dominant position, framing views of the landscape.

 
 
The research focuses on the relation between the project and the landscape where it sits. A process that goes from the dominant landscape and the constructed element in contact with the natural soil, to get shelter and perceive the dominant views.
Haus Rüscher by OLKRÜF

Haus Rüscher by OLKRÜF

Haus Rüscher by OLKRÜF located mountains of Western Austria around a kilometer away from the nearest village and OLKRÜF designed the house as two self-contained buildings that impact as little possible on the surrounding countryside. “It was important for the client to build a very compact house that would not spoil the local landscape by sealing over the top surface with unnecessary concrete, gravel or tarmac,” the architects explain.

The outer shell of each building comprises a single casting of concrete, designed to reference the solid volumes of the surrounding mountains. “The most challenging part of the project was the single-piece construction,

Exposed concrete walls are sandblasted to create smooth interior surfaces on the lower level. Floors are lined with elm boards, which also clad the walls and ceilings in the bedrooms.

 

Large windows pierce the concrete facade on different sides to give residents clear views across the mountain and forest landscape.

“The most successful thing for us was managing not to compromise on the design from start to finish,” added Read. “That is something that rarely happens in the industry, but in this case the final result is almost identical to the original concept. Partly this was due to our perseverance and partly it was due to the client believing and sharing in our vision.”

Photography is by Adolf Bereuter.

Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez

Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez

Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez | The Hardt

 

The unreal views from Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez. The hotel sits an altitude of 9,500-feet in the Chilean Andes on the edge of the Inga Lagoon. Special consideration was taken not to spoil the view over the lake and surrounding mountains by partially inserting the 3,175 ft² (295 m²) Chalet C7 within a slope. With unreal views of the untouched landscape. The only visible sign of a dwelling existing at all from the surface is the bunker-like entrance shaft which guides the inhabitants down into the hillside.

 


 

The interior has two levels. A base level, built with rocks taken from the same hill, protects from snow in the winter. This wall defines the first floor, anchoring the building to the ground; the bedrooms and private spaces of the house are located behind it. These areas, whose dimensions vary according to domestic needs, are open to the outside. Over the main floor is a second level completely open to the landscape and the northern lights. In this open-plan space, the objects are organized in a flexible way. A robust structure of metal beams defines the tectonic quality of space and allows this open space. The exposure of the large beams, unusual in a domestic space, makes gravity visible.

 

 

 

© Erieta Attali

 

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

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