The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects

The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects

The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects | The Hardt

The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects is an addition and renovation of a Tribeca loft building. The existing structure, a traditional New York warehouse covers the entire lot, consuming the exterior space traditional in domestic construction. Inverting the conventional townhouse organization recovers this coveted ground. Dissipating energy into the dark center of this converted warehouse, three double story voids animate the missing “garden” of the townhouse providing light, air, and visual contemplation.

Admitting light and townhouse “garden” uses, these new spaces provide the structure for domestic life. Exterior court, reading court, and playroom are suspended into the void. Conceived as a new construction built upside down into an existing building, they dissipate a radiant energy into the host.

Self-structuring corten steel panels are suspended in the voids, their shingle style layering allowing the frameless burgundy glass to float down through the walls. The suspended corten structure extends into the double height volume of the playroom with two-story shelving. Continuing the flow of dissipating energy, the downward trajectory opens the floors of the lower levels, inserting two glass floors. Framed with rolled corten sections, they connect the spaces vertically while opening them to light. Countering the downward hanging of spaces is a courtyard layer of silicone-glazed glass, which lifts delicately to the skyline.

 


Consistent with the logic of inversion, the main entry is onto the fifth floor. Opening onto the tense juxtaposition of exterior and interior voids, the garden lifts to the rooftop while the stair court descends into the private spaces. Two sequences separate public and private routes through these spaces. The upward route joins the public spaces, ending in a continuous roof deck inhabiting the larger space of the city. The downward route traces the inversion into the bedrooms, playrooms, and study through the stair, culminating in the glass floors and extending a view back up through all the gardens to the sky.
© Paul Warchol

 

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Tribeca Loft (2013) by Andrew Franz Architect

Tribeca Loft (2013) by Andrew Franz Architect

Tribeca Loft (2013) by Andrew Franz Architect located in a former warehouse in New York neighborhood of Tribeca.In Manhattan’s landmarked Tribeca North area, the 3,000-ft² (278 m²) top floor and roof of an 1884 caviar warehouse are reconceived as a residence with large open entertaining zones and a fluid connection with the outdoor environment. The residence is transformed by a relocated mezzanine where a sunken interior court with a retractable glass roof connects to the planted green roof garden above. This gesture of subtracting volume from the interior brings the outdoors into the primary living zones. The roof, peeled back, showers the spaces with natural light. When open, ample air flow enters what was once a poorly ventilated and dark loft. By night, the court acts as an internal lantern illuminating the loft below.

 


Embracing the building’s industrial past, a visual discourse between new and old is devised through insertions of modern materials along with restored or reclaimed materials from the loft. A custom steel stair repurposes timbers from the old roof joists as treads and landings. The multiple level residence is unified by a walnut fascia that serves as a conceptual datum. To add to its sustainable nature, new and energy-efficient mechanical systems and appliances are employed. The project reclaims and reuses loft materials while bringing in new, locally sourced products including the appliances, retractable glass roof, architectural metal work, and cabinetry. The new roof terrace utilizes reclaimed bluestone pavers and a majority of native plant species that require little water while insulating the environment below.
© Albert Vecerka/Esto

Sam Shahid’s Apartment in Greenwich Village

Sam Shahid’s Apartment in Greenwich Village

Sam Shahid’s Apartment in Greenwich Village, “As an art director, Sam Shahid composes pictures that make you stop and look: a young couple, nude, on the back of an elephant; a tangle of men engaged in a game of sexual Twister. His provocative advertisements for Calvin Klein, Banana Republic and Abercrombie & Fitch stirred controversy throughout the ’80s and ’90s, paving the way for a more open-minded approach to branding and inspiring countless imitators drawn to his spare aesthetic. Shahid, in his uniform of khakis and a crisp white shirt, describes his style as American Pure. I always use the words ‘simplicity’ and ‘direct’,  he says.
 
 

 
To enter Shahid’s three-story prewar apartment in Greenwich Village is to understand those words, and to get the sense that success has bought him something else: silence. In a way, it is a reaction to the demanding whirl of fashion. He has created a nearly empty setting in which even his most soul-satisfying possessions — books, art — are banished from sight behind doors that blend seamlessly with the walls. It’s as though he has chosen to contain his passions in order to clear his head and, at the same time, draw out the openness of the space.”
 
Cumberland Street Townhouse (2014) by Elizabeth Roberts

Cumberland Street Townhouse (2014) by Elizabeth Roberts

Cumberland Street Townhouse (2014) by Elizabeth Roberts Architecture and Design located in Brooklyn, New York, USA | The Hardt

 

Cumberland Street Townhouse (2014) by Elizabeth Roberts Architecture and Design located in Brooklyn, New York, USA. The Cumberland St Townhouse is located on a park block in the neighborhood of Fort Greene in Brooklyn, NY. The house was in a dilapidated state when the owners purchased the building; the rear wall was falling down and water had been entering the building for several years.

 

 


 

The house was completely transformed with a new rear wall and a two-story addition at the back of the house. The addition is open to the living room above and is connected through interior steel and glass windows that mimic the two-story exterior windows. The doors at the garden open completely to create a seamless connection between the kitchen / dining level and the garden. Vines were planted in recessed planters along the 2 story party walls in the dining room–the room was designed to be an indoor-outdoor space where the garden melds with the interior spaces. The vines now cover the double-story party walls and add an organic quality to the connected interior spaces. The top of the addition serves as a private balcony for the master bedroom

 

© Dustin Aksland


 

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Art Port by Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects

Art Port by Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects

Art Port by Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects located in Water Mill, an affluent hamlet of Southampton, New York, USA | The Hardt

 

Art Port by Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects located in Water Mill, an affluent hamlet of Southampton, New York, USA. Art Port is a free of charge standing pavilion produced for an art dealer as an addition to a present residence. It creates an arrival sequence for the homeowners and their visitor

 

 

 

 


 

Formed from a single flat roof that rests on 2 reliable volumes, it is separated from the major residence by a bamboo garden. A wood walkway slices via the garden creating a bodily connection in between the pavilion and the primary residence. The basic open prepare of the pavilion gives versatility, simply transforming into an impromptu art gallery. Huge glass openings welcome the outdoors in. The pavilion generates the best backdrop for events, in which the architecture and landscape highlight the installations.

 

 

Photos by: Matthew Carbone

 


 

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Further Lane House (2010) by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects

Further Lane House (2010) by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects

Situated in Amagansett, New York, USA Further Lane House (2010) by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects. The 10,000 ft² (930 m²) house is assembled from five quite visible components: three one-story stone-clad structures and a roofed outdoor pavilion, surmounted by a glass-clad volume. Bars of Valmalenco stone clad the first-floor exteriors, appearing inside to identify structural walls as well.


 

Carriage House (2010) by David Adjaye

Carriage House (2010) by David Adjaye

 
Carriage House (2010) by David Adjaye located on The Upper East Side of NY, because, of course. The house belongs to the fairly tasteful collector, Adam Lindemann and his wife Amalia Dayan. Let’s be honest with ourselves, the house is a private museum, at once exhibitionistic and secret. A gallery for Lindemann’s collection occupies nearly the whole ground floor, and the house wraps itself around the art, much in the way a house with this level of collection should. A glass bridge offers a view of Maurizio Cattelan’s dead Pinocchio lying in a pit below. The living-­dining room accommodates Damien Hirst’s vast painting of hugely magnified cancer cells, sprinkled with shards of glass and razor blades. One of the highlights, besides the art, is the vertiginous stack of bedrooms; at the top of the tower, one of Andy Warhol’s “Electric Chair” silk-screens hangs across from the master bed. Collection is serious. So is the house.

 


 

Photos by Lyndon Douglas  & David Adjaye

 

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