House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk

House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk

House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk located in Tigre, Argentina | The Hardt

 

House 2LH (2016) by Luciano Kruk located in Tigre, Argentina. The client – a medium-scale construction company – carried out a market study on the housing demands of the average socio-economic class in the northern area of Greater Buenos Aires. When finding scarce in the commercial offer of houses of constructive and architectural quality -for which there is a great demand-, he decides to commission the Study the design of a prototype of housing capable of being replicated: the Casa 2HL.

 

The housing commissioned would have to be configured in a single plant. It had to adapt to lots of medium dimensions (17 to 20 m wide by 35 to 40 m deep approximately) and its footage could not exceed 170 m² total. The program -established by the client- should respond to the needs of a family type: a social area composed of a living-dining-kitchen, a master bedroom served by a bathroom en suite, two secondary bedrooms with shared bathroom, local service, solarium, pool, and barbeque.

 

 


 

In response to these requirements, the Study proposes a dwelling contained in a pure prism organized on a modular grid of 1×1 m, of lateral en-suite mostly paraments and open to the front and the quiet part of the building. The distribution of the spaces around a central patio was proposed, which would not only help to illuminate the interior circulations but also -for its plant layout- to generate cross ventilation through all the premises of the house. The selection of materials was made with the intention of prioritizing the control of costs and their speed and constructive practicality. Instead of the traditional exposed concrete used in our homes, we used the masonry of load-bearing hollow brick; and instead of the smoothed cement floor, it was decided to coat them with 1×1 m plates of cement-like termination porcellanite.

 

In order to preserve the privacy of the front bedrooms -without these losing the views to the outside- and to protect them from the direct incidence of the sun, an artifact was constituted by vertical shutters and a hardwood pergola, structured by profiles of double steel T. A similar resource was used to create a gallery in the quiet part of the building that served as an expansion to the master bedroom and the social area. With the purpose of emphasizing the luminosity and spaciousness of their spaces dimensions, we suggest a chromatically clear interior, while for the exterior we proposed a darker finish, able to dialogue without competition with its natural environment. The first house of the series was built in 2016 in the neighborhood of La Comarca (neighbor to Nordelta) in the Tigre Party of the Province of Buenos Aires.

 


 

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Villa Criss Cross Envelope (2015) by OFIS Architects

Villa Criss Cross Envelope (2015) by OFIS Architects

Villa Criss Cross Envelope (2015) by OFIS Architects located in Ljubljana, Slovenia | The Hardt

 

Villa Criss Cross Envelope (2015) by OFIS Architects located in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The Villa is located in the Mirje Suburbs within the city center of Ljubljana, Slovenia. The street of the villa runs perpendicular to the ancient Roman Wall and continues into a pedestrian passageway under the stone pyramid designed by Plecnik (as part his reconstruction project along the wall). The Villa’s new structure embeds an existing retaining wall along the street front. By incorporating the wall as part of the new construction, the new house keeps original position on this street in an axial alignment to the pyramid.

 


 

The external structure is composed of a cube volume and perforated metal envelope. The volume extracts cut-outs to create pockets of space that provide a pyramidical stepping down along the roof, avoid along the entrance and private glass patios with terraces for living areas of the house. Using a material with holes on both sides aims to make an abstract interpretation of the texture of classical villas in the historical suburb. The rough classical façade was represented with double perforated panels; the task was to achieve texture through the illusion of depth which allows a light presence and enhances the shadows and reflections of a palette of beige tints. The three-dimensional texture creates a dynamic abstraction while encapsulating its coherent volume. Diagonal crosses act as a functional and graphic representation. The crosses brace the frames of panels and create identity like façade ornaments on historical citizen villas.

 


 

The internal volume embodies two elements: exposed structural concrete walls and a wooden shell. The project required a residence for a single family with three children. The brief was to maximize the living area with a minimum of the service space. The concept divides space based on a distinct program by separating function not by walls but floor levels: the ground floor is living/communal space, the first floor is children area and second-floor parents area. With no cellar, the shell is integral to provide all of the space for storage. The flush walls fold out to house cupboards, shelves, and drawers throughout the living areas and furniture such as beds, seating and counters are built into the floor in order to optimize space and provide easy maintenance. This connects different spaces in the house by giving a common function to partitions.

 

 

© Tomaz Gregoric 

 


 

 

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House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates located in Singapore | The Hardt

 

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates located in Singapore. In a usual circumstance, the front of the house is the most important – not in our case. House 24 is sited on a triangular plot, a constraint that we took on as an opportunity to really engage with the siting and planning of the house – to achieve a meaningful footprint that actualized the client’s spatial, functional, and privacy requirement. Moreover, the site adjoins a lushly landscaped state land that we endeavored to take advantage of at every available opportunity and every habitable space. As such, we turned the house away from the main road and neighboring houses, and instead, have the living spaces open out to the mature greenery beyond. The result is amassing comprising of two blocks which, when combined, define a V-shaped patio on the first floor that becomes the focal point of common activities and entertainment, borrowing views from the surrounding greenery.

 

 


 

The courtyard screen fronting the street is an exercise in rethinking the conventional entry sequence of residential dwellings, and an exploration in creating a more layered and sequential experience. It is experienced almost as a ritual space – serene and tranquil – marking the transition between the public and private. It was also an opportunity to explore what timber craftsmanship might mean in contemporary architecture, and we envisioned the screen to be a well-crafted element with a modern aesthetic and detailing. It eventually manifested itself as a refined and rhythmic facade, drawing attention to its delicate scale even as a structure that is over 8m high. A delightful pattern of light and shadow play out over the course of each day whilst allowing sunlight to filter in and natural air to stream in, creating a relaxing ambiance that reinforces the client’s desire to live in a home that reflected its tropical locality.

 

© Edward Hendricks

 


 

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Lotus House (2005) by Kengo Kuma

Lotus House (2005) by Kengo Kuma

Lotus House (2005) by Kengo Kuma, located in eastern Japan by a quiet river, deep in the mountains | The Hardt

 

Lotus House (2005) by Kengo Kuma, located in eastern Japan by a quiet river, deep in the mountains. Kengo says he thought of filling water between the river and the house and planting lotus so that the dwelling would be conveyed by the lotus to the river and continue into the woods on the other side of the river. The architecture itself is basically composed of holes. It is divided into two wings, with the hole-shaped terrace in between serving to connect the wood in the back of the house with the woods on the opposite bank. Wall surfaces are also designed as countless holes.

 

I thought to build a state where nature and architecture were blended on a quiet riverbank in a deep mountain. I thought about watering between the river and the house, planting a lotus, and creating a state where the house continues to the river and the forest of the opposite bank with Lotus pond as a medium.

 

 


 

Construction of the building itself is based on a hole. The building is divided into two buildings, and a large terrace-shaped in the shape of the holes that occurred during that time plays a role of connecting the forest on the back side and the forest on the other side. The wall is also designed as countless holes. While using a material with a sense of weight as a stone, we made a light wall like the wind blows through. By hanging a thin travertine plate of 20 cm × 60 cm, 30 mm in heat from a flat bar of 8 × 16 mm and making it a detail constituting a checkered board like porous pattern, it is like a paper while it is a stone, and a lotus I could make a light wall like a petal.

 

Photo © Daici Ano


 

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Wakaka Temporary Store by Penda

Wakaka Temporary Store by Penda

Wakaka Temporary Store by Penda, Tianjin – China | The Hardt

 

Wakaka Temporary Store by Penda, located in Tianjin – China. Architecture studio Penda has designed a retail outlet for Wakaka, a Chinese mobile app developer, formed from carefully arranged wooden boxes. The team was commissioned to conceive a temporary store to display the client’s gadgets and advertise its apps. This brief resulted in a design which bridged virtual and physical worlds, connecting visitors to their online store.

 

The boxes form a modular arrangement, designed to represent digital pixels. The units have been coupled together to form a continuous landscape that spans the length of the store. Each box serves as a frame to display products and can be readily adapted in a multitude of ways to meet the demands of the client. All 2,000 pieces were prefabricated before being delivered to the site, where they were assembled in less than 10 hours.

 

The current configuration is a temporary pop-up store in the Chinese city of Tianjin. After seven months, the store will be dissembled and all its parts relocated to six smaller outlets across both Tianjin and Beijing. As the shop moves, its ‘pixels’ will be reassembled in a variety of different configurations depending on each location’s characteristics and functions. The fully modular, prefabricated design seeks to offer a great degree of flexibility while providing a pleasant and habitable environment for guests and staff.

 

 

 

 

 

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