Villa Kaplansky by B-Architecten

Villa Kaplansky by B-Architecten

Asher 12:41 am 8:48 pm

Located in Wilrijk, Belgium Villa Kaplansky by B-architecten | The Hardt

 

Located in Wilrijk, Belgium Villa Kaplansky by B-architecten. This house, designed by the architect Nachman Kaplansky in 1934, was dramatically rebuilt in 1962. The openings for the windows were changed and nothing remained of the original interior. During the renovation, the original volume was restored and the villa was given back its grandeur. The original steel window frames could be reconstructed thanks to the original building schemes. The interior’s design is new with materials reminiscent of the thirties, such as travertine and terrazzo. The winding stairs and the fireplace are the eye catchers in the living room. In the back of the garden, there is a pond and a modern-day concrete pavilion with a fireplace.

 

 

 

 

Status completed – 2011
Location Wilrijk
Client private
Team Sarai Bervoets, Nele Boussemaere, Christophe Combes, Evert Crols, Ilse De Ridder, Dirk Engelen, Christoph Fischer, Sven Grooten

 

 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 

 


 

The Barn (2016) by Carney Logan Burke

The Barn (2016) by Carney Logan Burke

Asher 6:03 pm 12:51 am

Situated near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, United States, The Barn (2016) by Carney Logan Burke Architects | The Hardt

 

Situated near Jackson Hole, Wyoming, United States, The Barn (2016) by Carney Logan Burke Architects. Whatever the attraction, the architectural barn style was the look that the homeowners were after when they decided to add a guesthouse to their 15-acre property on Tucker Ranch.  The couple’s architect and friend, John Carney of Carney Logan Burke Architects in Jackson, equivocated – for a minute. “I remember they handed me photos of the real barns. I suggested maybe we didn’t want to settle on a form so quickly, but in this case, it really was them saying ‘No, this is what we want’”.

 


 

But because the barn shape “is very classic and traditional”, Carney says, “we knew we wanted to add an element of surprise in the design.  That surprise took the form of a huge second-story gridded glass wall, which looks due north to the Tetons and the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort and has two lower hopper windows that open up to provide fresh air. “The whole thing is proportioned to look like a loft hay-loading space as if it were big double doors you brought hay into,” says Carney.

 

 


 

Besides needing a guest house for the family’s many visitors, the homeowners wanted a dedicated workout area for her (“I exercise outside whenever I can, but needed something with views to use in bad weather” she says.) and, for him, an expansive first-floor garage with a ceramic checkerboard tile floor. The building pays homage to 19th-century working barns: the exterior and interior walls, in fact, are built of old barn wood (from Montana Reclaimed Lumber), two-foot-square punched windows on the first floor mimic traditional barn windows and the interior has a pitched ceiling supported by knee braces interspersed between trusses, a design that is both striking to look at and necessary to support the cedar shake roof during Wyoming’s heavy winter snows.

 

© Audrey Hall Photograph

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 

https://thehardt.com/architecture/vanvaaso-2015-by-design-work-group/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/de-baedts-house-2016-by-architektuuburo-dirk-hulpia/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/the-timber-house-from-kuhnlein-architektur/

 


 

Brise House (2013) by Gisele Taranto Arquitetura

Brise House (2013) by Gisele Taranto Arquitetura

Asher 2:20 am 12:46 am

Brise House (2013) by Gisele Taranto Arquitetura located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil | The Hardt

 

Brise House (2013) by Gisele Taranto Arquitetura located in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This project consists of a renovation of a house located in a noble neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Set in a lively area, the noise control was one of the top challenges, which in the end, had great influence on the final look of the architecture itself.

The main guidelines to solve this question was to turn the house to an interior courtyard, while movable shutters were integrated to the main facade, working as noise filters, but at the same time letting natural light into space. The courtyard, integrated to the living area, also lets natural light inside all rooms. The gardens – that surround the whole structure – let the green foliage visually connected with the interior area through glass panels that build the facade.

 

 

The house was originally composed of two separate buildings. Their integration was also an important key point of this project. Only one main block was created, with living area on the ground floor, private areas on the second floor, all directed to the interior courtyard, where the swimming pool and a living room were located; and service area on the basement. There was also a huge concern in keeping the original features of the house, like the stairs, for example, that had its original structure kept and was updated to contemporaneity through the materials and the new rail made of iron. Were also kept the Portuguese tiles from the dining room.

© MCA Estudio

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

https://thehardt.com/architecture/9763-2/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/flower-cage-house-2017-anonym/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/portobello-house-2016-by-tripper-arquitetura/

 

Roduit House Transformation (2005) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Roduit House Transformation (2005) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Asher 5:25 pm 6:44 pm

Located in Chamoson, Switzerland, Roduit House Transformation (2005) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes | The Hardt

 

Located in Chamoson, Switzerland, Roduit House Transformation (2005) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes. This building was constructed in stages from 1814 onwards and was used as a rural house. It is made up of three adjacent areas on different levels. On the ground floor, it is crossed by an access way which indicates the presence of a former right of way to the next-door building. The imposing proximity of the rocks and its stone construction allows the structure to blend seamlessly into it’s surroundings. The renovation seeks to maintain and reinforce this character, by emphasizing the existing stone structure while using concrete for the parts to be replaced, in order to create a completely mineral feel to the entire project

 

 


 

The exterior volume has not been changed. The stone has been preserved and lined inside with an insulating layer of concrete based on foamed recycled glass (misapor). This insulating lining forms the new load-bearing structure and reinforces the old stone walls while providing thermal insulation. The parts of the façade formerly constructed of timber weatherboarding have been replaced by a monolithic wall of insulating concrete with formwork which reproduces the former texture of the timber.

 

The window apertures have been retained and some larger windows added in order to let more natural light into the main interior spaces and to provide views over the surrounding landscape. These new windows are flush with the exterior in order to minimize their impact on the volume of the building, as well as to emphasize and make good use of the substantial thickness of the walls. In harmony with the exterior, the interior is formed from unrefined mineral materials, with its natural stone, exposed concrete, and polished screed floors. Only a few elements, such as the kitchen or the sanitary fittings, are in contrast to this character

 

 

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Garth (2015) by Ola Studio

Garth (2015) by Ola Studio

Asher 1:57 pm 12:46 am

Situated in Melbourne, Australia, Garth (2015) by Ola Studio | The Hardt

 

Situated in Melbourne, Australia, Garth (2015) by Ola Studio. Located in Northcote, Garth was once a dilapidated nineteenth-century Italianate Victorian masonry dwelling which has since been restored and added to with an elegant and restrained timber addition to accommodate a young family of five and two energetic dogs.

 


 

The original house is one solid form with all rooms contained within a single volume, and on a high level when considering how to add to what was already there, a conscious decision was made to approach the design with architectural contrasts and similarities. The new build adopts the rectilinear forms of the old, but varies their sequence and size to create a series of intimate internal and external spaces. Externally the new addition reads as a reserved collection of rigid forms stacked on top of, or next to one another, while the internal circulation functions as a seamless transition from one defined space to the next.

 

© Derek Swalwell

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

https://thehardt.com/architecture/house-mv-2017-by-cristian-alvarado-espinoza/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/armadale-residence-be-architecture/

 


 

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