Ecork Hotel (2013) by José Carlos Cruz | The Hardt

Ecork Hotel (2013) by José Carlos Cruz | The Hardt

Ecork Hotel (2013) by José Carlos Cruz located in Evora, Portugal | The Hardt

 

Ecork Hotel (2013) by José Carlos Cruz located in Evora, Portugal. Ecork is a Hotel in Évora, Portugal, with a spa, health club, gym, restaurant, bar, conference rooms, outdoor pool and 56 bungalows. Built on a set of cork and olive trees, the general plan is inspired in the Medieval villages of the Alentejo, where it was common to find the main complex (Castle ) and several white buildings around it.

 

 

 


 

All services and hotel facilities are aggregated into a single building, freeing the land outside the bungalows. Influenced by the vernacular and Arabic architecture, is created a monolithic volume with small openings to the outside, which together with cork coating, fully recyclable, ensures the thermal protection of the building. Built around a large courtyard, the layout is designed so as to take advantage of crosswinds and air circulation, thus reducing power consumption to the minimum necessary.

 

 

 


 

In order to ensure the lowest possible occupation and overview of the Alentejo Landscape, outdoor pool and bar are located on the roof of the building. All 56 bungalows are suites. Their deployment, scattered among the olive trees around the property is defined by the structure of internal thoroughfares. These paths are read as a series of abstract volumes and surfaces, plastered and whitewashed.

 

 

© Fernando Guerra I FG+SG

 

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

 

Matale Holiday Retreat (2009) by Thisara Thanapathy Associates

Matale Holiday Retreat (2009) by Thisara Thanapathy Associates

Matale Holiday Retreat (2009) by Thisara Thanapathy Associates located in Matale, Sri Lanka. The building is positioned to create an immense enclosure of space between the building and encircling crescent of mountains across the valley.


The building is linear in form. It does not dominate the landscape but tries to be a gentle noticeable part of it. This thin form does minimum damage to the vegetation while allowing the sun and rain to fall on the ground. All this minimizes the damage to the ecology. By being on pillars it allows the breezes to cool the building. Timber grills used on either side of the upper-level bedrooms provide ample natural ventilation. A thin metal roof with its long eaves shades the building.
 

Salvaged materials are used for the building. These salvaged materials had been purchased prior to designing the building. Steel and timber grills were salvaged from a demolished factory. The decks are out of salvaged railway sleepers. Rest of the timber was purchased from the locality. There are only two main masonry walls, except the peripheral walls of the toilets.
 

 


 
The building is approached via a long walkway by the side of an elongated wall. At the end of the long walkway begins a viewing deck which is perpendicular to it. This viewing deck is pierced through the building and is in the center of the vast space between the mountain range and the building enabling the user to fully experience it. This viewing deck is orientated towards a patch of paddy field, which is a significant feature of this landscape.

While the building tries to capture different views from the dining room and the bedrooms, it is the extreme end of the significant deck that provides the dramatic experience of an encompassing space defined by the mountain range and the building.
Yoshino-sugi Cedar House (2016) by Go Hasegawa

Yoshino-sugi Cedar House (2016) by Go Hasegawa

Yoshino-sugi Cedar House (2016) by Go Hasegawa, located in Tokyo | The Hardt

 

Yoshino-sugi Cedar House (2016) by Go Hasegawa, located in Tokyo, Japan. Leading the world in the community-driven hospitality business, Airbnb is creating a new narrative with Nara Prefecture’s Yoshino town through HOUSE VISION. Using Yoshino cedar, the architect Go Hasegawa designed a house that aims to build new relationships with the area, as the community acts as the host. The first floor of this house is opened up to the townspeople as a community space—for free use. Mothers can let children play while enjoying a chat, and the elderly can stop by on their walk for a cup of tea.

 

 

 

 

The gable-roofed loft on the second floor is space provided for accommodating outside guests. After the exhibition period, the house will be brought back to Yoshino and registered on Airbnb. The reconstructed house in Yoshino will be set along the river, with the sunrise room facing east and the sunset room facing west. Travelers using Airbnb can engage more deeply with the local community. It is a house made to create new relationships between the people of the community and its visitors.

 

Check the rental listing here

 

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

The Farm (2015) by Fergus Scott Architects.

The Farm (2015) by Fergus Scott Architects.

Winner of a 2016 AIA Award, The Farm (2015) by Fergus Scott Architects, located in New South Wales, Australia. Four rammed earth pavilions make up this remote and very unique property. They provide refuge from the elements, elements of which are concurrent with the open environment and the seemingly endless grassland. The communal environment and the coastal views make this a truly one a kind retreat. This project received a 2016 AIA Award.

 


 

Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez

Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez

Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez | The Hardt

 

The unreal views from Chalet C7 by Nicolás del Rio and Max Núñez. The hotel sits an altitude of 9,500-feet in the Chilean Andes on the edge of the Inga Lagoon. Special consideration was taken not to spoil the view over the lake and surrounding mountains by partially inserting the 3,175 ft² (295 m²) Chalet C7 within a slope. With unreal views of the untouched landscape. The only visible sign of a dwelling existing at all from the surface is the bunker-like entrance shaft which guides the inhabitants down into the hillside.

 


 

The interior has two levels. A base level, built with rocks taken from the same hill, protects from snow in the winter. This wall defines the first floor, anchoring the building to the ground; the bedrooms and private spaces of the house are located behind it. These areas, whose dimensions vary according to domestic needs, are open to the outside. Over the main floor is a second level completely open to the landscape and the northern lights. In this open-plan space, the objects are organized in a flexible way. A robust structure of metal beams defines the tectonic quality of space and allows this open space. The exposure of the large beams, unusual in a domestic space, makes gravity visible.

 

 

 

© Erieta Attali

 

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

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