Lộc House (2016) by 23o5studio

Lộc House (2016) by 23o5studio

Asher 7:02 am 7:02 am

Lộc House (2016) by 23o5studio located in Thành phố Thủ Dầu Một, Vietnam | The Hardt

 

Lộc House (2016) by 23o5studio located in Thành phố Thủ Dầu Một, Vietnam. Lộc House is a living space of a family with 2 young daughters. The space’s intention is to connect the family members’ activities together. The house’s common area features a small courtyard roofed by a veranda, where the children can enjoy the open space. Lộc house’s colorful veranda casts wavy silhouettes on the wood clad floor. The common space is “Mái hiên” and a small courtyard inside, where children can playing around, reading a book,… In the home, all members are able to observe and communicate with one another through “Khoảng trống.” In the course of operation, human communication of light, wind, and plants act as a resonant and emotional touch. The house’s character then becomes an organic part of the environment, along with the plethora of greenery decorating the rooms. The bedrooms are considered to meet in a just enough way. The architects intentionally left the open space untouched in order to facilitate communication between each other.

 

 

 

© KingKien Photography

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina

Asher 6:39 am 6:39 am

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina located in La Romana, Alicante, Spain | The Hardt

 

Spa + Hotel La Romana (2012) by Isaac Peral Codina located in La Romana, Alicante, Spain. The local field contains oxides that stain the red landscape. The building has been built with local stone, such as Marble Rojo Alicante, blending in well with the surroundings. The block, marble, and scarlet welcomes you inside, austere but comfortable, and offers a sensorial experience of water and light. The soft light from inside only broke with the light entering through the many cracks in the coating carved marble. There is an attractive interior space, which only communicates with the outside through strategically located grooves that discover you the landscape. The concrete ceiling finished with the texture of the wooden forms, reflects the water sparkle, opens through skylights. In this way, the lighting is overhead, which when mixed with water vapor surrounds you in a nice weightless environment.

Living the Spa Sunsets is a vibrant experience. The light is transformed from a natural light cascading down the skylights with orange warm colors. Entering through the cracks in hundreds of lighting lines that reinforce the red light of the stone, until you can feel gradually the artificial lighting designed to introduce a fun and relaxing environment. The Sunrise reverses the process. All used construction materials are natural (stone, iron, and wood), and they are typical for the area, reinterpreting a vernacular architecture and a lyrical form, where predominates the light treatment to perceive the space. This makes a very modern architecture, fed by the building tradition of the area.

 

 


 

In addition to its innovative design of the facilities, unlike any other Spa, in its facilities, there is a saving energy system that uses the bioclimatic techniques which have made the building a sustainable and economical installation. All lighting system in the SPA is natural.  Artificial lighting is necessary only during the night. Inside we use the perimeter skylights. The natural lighting in all spaces is solved by the glass wall facade, whose light will filter through the lattice. The lattice prevents the sunlight to enter straight into de interior space, then, in warm months, cooling is not required. The spaces have cross ventilation to provide dehumidification and hydrothermal comfort. The energy from the solar panels heats the water in the pool and in the indoor spa. The marble stone is an excellent receptive material that keeps the space warm in winter for many hours, even overnight.
All materials used are local, minimizing transportation costs and manufacturing. Therefore the ecological impact of the building is very small.

© David Frutos

Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH Architects

Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH Architects

Asher 10:27 pm 10:27 pm

Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH architects located in Sonnesgade 11, Aarhus C, Denmark | The Hardt

 

Sonnesgade 11 (2016) by SLETH architects located in Sonnesgade 11, Aarhus C, Denmark. As the city of Aarhus prepares for 2017, a number of urban districts are being transformed from industry to modern city districts. One of the main cultural venues in 2017 will be Godsbanen – a new lively and cultural district on the old freight terminal area. The new mixed building by SLETH is situated nearby Godsbanen and reflects the transformation from industry to the lively cultural urban district. The starting point for the design of the new office building is an ambition to reuse and rethink spatial and material quality on the former industrial site. The new building is directly grounded on the original underground industrial constructions, which acts as the building’s foundation.

 


 

The building consists of 3 stacked layers of 50 meters long office floors supported by a core wall. Underneath the office floors, where the sloping terrain defines an opening, the restaurant is located facing the street. The parking garage and a wine retailer is located under the sloping landscape. The building has a high degree of flexibility and interaction between the floors, which enhances the meeting situations between different users of the building. The individual floors are open, flexible working environments with the service functions integrated as a single architectural element in the eastern facade of the building.

 

 

Around the building, the sloped asphalt terrain is forming the outdoor areas for terraces, bikes, and gardens. The building´s expression is a collage of elements reflecting the surroundings with 6 facades creating a dialogue with the mixed vague context. The project itself is a 1:1 realization of the architecture and challenges of the office SLETH as both landowners, developer, and architects – based on the potential of Sonnesgade. Product Description. The building features a large range of standard industrial materials: glass, steel, concrete. As a contrast to the hard industrial materials, the custom-made doors and furniture (both inside and outside) are done in oak and similar warm materials. 

 

© Rasmus Hjortshøj / C O A S T  

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso

LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso

Asher 12:28 pm 12:33 pm

LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso located in Manuel López Cotilla, Col del Valle Centro, México City, Mexico | The Hardt

 

LC 710 by Taller Héctor Barroso located in Manuel López Cotilla, Col del Valle Centro, México City, Mexico. The building LC710 is located in a residential area in the center of ¨Colonia del Valle¨ in Mexico City. The site has a rectangular form, with a narrow front of 10 meters facing the street and 32 meters in depth. This proportion and the east-west orientation resulted in a compositional scheme which parts from three volumes interleaved with three ¨Patios¨ /voids.

 


 

The diagonal connection between these two program areas allows each unit to take advantage of the first-floor ¨patios¨ and the gardens on the rooftop so that each unit has its own private exterior area that merges with the interior space. Six housing units make up the interior of these volumes through two different typologies. Within the first two volumes, the same four units develop, in which the social area is on the first one facing the street and the private areas are on the second one, linked between the circulation core, evident in the intermediate ¨patios¨/voids. In the third volume, two different units take part, each one consisting of two superimposed levels, that also merge with the exterior spaces in a more intimate and silent atmosphere.

 

 


 

The two materials used are concrete, with a color aggregate, and steel. Finding in both good aging and low maintenance. Their use not only seeks to exalt their structural characteristics but also to generate a good atmosphere through their sensorial qualities.

 

© Rafael Gamo

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

 
Church of San Giovanni Battista (1996) by Mario Botta

Church of San Giovanni Battista (1996) by Mario Botta

Asher 4:53 pm 4:53 pm

 

Mario Botta -The Space Beyond (Official Trailer – English) from Michael Glowacki on Vimeo.

 

 

Located in Mogno, Switzerland, Church of San Giovanni Battista (1996) by Mario Botta | The Hardt

 

The Church of San Giovanni Battista (Italian: Chiesa di San Giovanni Battista; German: Kirche San Giovanni Battista) is located in the alpine village of Mogno in the Swiss canton of Ticino. Mario Botta describes his mountainous architecture as influenced by “two points of interaction: the exterior with the landscape; the interior with the domestic.” In this study I examine how his design of two churches in Ticino, Switzerland addresses the dissonance between the stoic exterior of the mountains and the touch of human scale inviting worshipers to solitude. I analyze Botta’s mountainous churches of the Chapel of St. Mary of the Angels, built in Monte Tamaro, 1990-1996 and the San Giovanni Battista Church, built in Mogno, 1992-1998  

The two churches exemplify the challenges of designing a house of worship for small parishes within breathtaking nature. The first challenge addresses the design solutions in the context of remote areas in the Alps. These locations evoke in themselves a spiritual experience, and the issue is how architecture contributes to the desired spiritual solitude. Second, both buildings were built from local stones linking them to their specific sites, expressing monumental qualities, and adhering to the spiritual qualities of the space: “Although the landscape is immense, the insertion of even a small object changes the scenery.” This solution brings with it the idea of architecture transforming the landscape, which in turn stimulates the spirit of man. Third, in each of the churches light is treated to enhance spiritual transcendence and to illustrate divine presence. Furthermore, these churches may be perceived as part of the continuous attempt of humans to build pillars from stone as a sacred link between earth and heaven, and as an expression of possessing the mountain. 

 

 


 

Mountains

Mountains are perceived as God’s dwelling and as a spot where the sacred manifests itself: “Now Mount Sinai was altogether in smoke, because the LORD descended upon it in fire; and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount quaked greatly” (Exodus 19:18). Moreover, the echoes of the surrounding mountains are perceived as the voices of spirits.4 These spiritual experiences inspire humans to erect their own ‘sacred mountains’. See for example the story of Jacob who set the stone up as a pillar and poured oil on its top to establish a sacred vertical axis (Genesis 28:18). These sacred structures often imitate in stone the form of mountains or are built on top of a mountain.  

Botta’s two churches are good examples for both of these approaches. The chapel in Monte Tamaro stands on top of the mountain and “’detaches’ itself from the mountain to form a new horizon, the starting point of an ideal viaduct.”5 The external horizontal axis of this chapel creates a sacred path offering a new glimpse of the mountains as a continuation of the worshiper-pilgrim’s infinite path for meditation and thought. Botta claims that building the chapel was a sign of a man in the landscape encompassing “the tension between man and nature.” The Church in Mogno was constructed as a vertical “pillar” becoming the focal point of the valley’s skyline, where two points in the valley are bridged to transform the landscape. This vertical axis expresses the spiritual axis mundi of the village, standing “as a bulwark for the village, in defiance of the mountain.” Indeed the church in Mogno was built in a place of an avalanche that caused death and loss. The location was requested by the residents of the village who said, “We want to construct a new church because there used to be a church here.” Thus the driving force underlying the project was maintaining the collective memory of the community. Botta’s design “brings with it not only the geography but also the memory, the culture, the history of that very place.” 

 

 


 

Stone

The use of locally quarried stones in the design of these churches expresses the specificity of the place as well as permanence and human longings for eternity. Stone is part of the layers and colors of the earth as shaped by winds and water and reveals the sacredness of the earth. In a poetic way stone is a gift of nature that illustrates the soul of the earth. Botta believes that putting a stone on earth is a sacred act of architecture and signifies the possession of the earth. This act “strives to evoke the deepest values suggested by the language of stones. Their symbolic and metaphoric meaning becomes an extraordinarily current message that involves the architect beyond the religious sphere.”

The chapel in Monte Tamaro is constructed from reinforced concrete faced with rusticated porphyry. This stone façade makes the chapel blend into the rocks of the mountain and transforms the mountain’s peak into a new height. Botta introduces us to a temporal visual experience with an outdoor procession on top of the chapel/the mountain. The stone of this chapel is facing the exterior only; the interior concrete is painted black and white to enhance the interplay of light and shadow and to create an intimate place to showcase contemporary liturgical art. Plastering the walls for displaying art resembles the fresco chapels in history.

In contrast, the church in Mogno is built of alternating courses of gray Riveo granite and white Peccia marble outside and inside, reminding us of some of the Tuscan Romanesque cathedrals. As such it continues a long history of church construction and creates a statement of permanence. The stone in this church demonstrates Botta’s mass architecture and enhances the transformation of the geometry of the building from a square plan to an ellipse and then to a circle. 

Light

While stone construction is a sacred act of architecture representing earth and permanence, the light becomes the soul of this act by introducing heaven. Eliade stated: “Even before any religious values have been set upon the sky it reveals its transcendence. The sky symbolizes transcendence, power, and changelessness simply by being there. It exists because it is high, infinite, immovable, powerful.”15 Light enhances the meaning of materials, forms, lines, and colors and beautifies the building. The visual experience in sacred settings contributes to the connection of the human with a higher order of things, with the essential and the immutable truth. The heavenly light in sacred settings illustrates the divine presence and is perceived as an attempt to enrich the inner spiritual experience of Lord as Light.17 This, in turn, fulfills human striving to be closer to the Divine. Moreover, light creates the temporal ambiance of the sacred since it is “the visual sign of the relationship that exists between the architectural work and the cosmic values of the surroundings.” Interestingly Botta treated this relation of light to the cosmos differently in the two churches. The chapel at Monte Tamaro, which is located below the outdoor crucifix, under the walkway on top of the mountain, is dimly lit like a grotto. Natural light penetrates through very small windows in the bottom of the circular sidewalls and through slits from a skylight. This light effect and the space’s strong linear path draw our attention to the artwork at the apes and diminish the invitation to meditation inside a protective ‘cave’ in the mountains. 

In the Mogno church, Botta introduced the ever-changing patterns of light and the relation to the cosmos through a circular glass roof. The sky opens up beyond the glass roof and brings the worshiper closer to the Divine. Two granite buttresses pierce the envelope of the building, arch over the interior and create an axis that aligns with the nave’s axis of the destroyed historic church. The light coming from above highlights this connection to the past and eternity. It also demonstrates Botta’s transformational geometry in stone. This, in turn, creates an interplay of stone layout, natural light, and shadows. In this church, Botta used light to capture the passage of time and establish our relationship with the solar, seasonal cycles and the eternal.  

Intense Text via ArtWay

Today marks 2 years since I started TheHardt Instagram account. I had no clue that I would end up embracing my creativity to such an extent that an excitingly beautiful website would be born. Thanks for joing me on this adventure and I promise to continue curating fire content for you plus lots more. 

 

Check out more on Mario Botta below

 

 

MARIO BOTTA, Mountain Church, Ticino, Switzerland from Ivan Maria Friedman on Vimeo.

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 

 


 

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