House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates located in Singapore | The Hardt

 

House 24 (2016) by Park + Associates located in Singapore. In a usual circumstance, the front of the house is the most important – not in our case. House 24 is sited on a triangular plot, a constraint that we took on as an opportunity to really engage with the siting and planning of the house – to achieve a meaningful footprint that actualized the client’s spatial, functional, and privacy requirement. Moreover, the site adjoins a lushly landscaped state land that we endeavored to take advantage of at every available opportunity and every habitable space. As such, we turned the house away from the main road and neighboring houses, and instead, have the living spaces open out to the mature greenery beyond. The result is amassing comprising of two blocks which, when combined, define a V-shaped patio on the first floor that becomes the focal point of common activities and entertainment, borrowing views from the surrounding greenery.

 

 


 

The courtyard screen fronting the street is an exercise in rethinking the conventional entry sequence of residential dwellings, and an exploration in creating a more layered and sequential experience. It is experienced almost as a ritual space – serene and tranquil – marking the transition between the public and private. It was also an opportunity to explore what timber craftsmanship might mean in contemporary architecture, and we envisioned the screen to be a well-crafted element with a modern aesthetic and detailing. It eventually manifested itself as a refined and rhythmic facade, drawing attention to its delicate scale even as a structure that is over 8m high. A delightful pattern of light and shadow play out over the course of each day whilst allowing sunlight to filter in and natural air to stream in, creating a relaxing ambiance that reinforces the client’s desire to live in a home that reflected its tropical locality.

 

© Edward Hendricks

 


 

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Scorpions Retreat by Michael Schickinger

Scorpions Retreat by Michael Schickinger

Scorpions Retreat by Michael Schickinger of Lambs&Lions located in Mykonos, Greece | The Hardt

 

Scorpions Retreat by Michael Schickinger of Lambs&Lions located in Mykonos, Greece. Situated on the picturesque island of Mykonos, Greece, Scorpios by Michael Schickinger of Lambs&Lions is an exclusive getaway that celebrates beach culture. The project was developed in close collaboration with interior designer Annabell Kutucu to merge natural textures with functional contemporary amenities: “We tried to infuse Scorpios with the classic materials and construction tactics found in Cycladic architecture to root it in its internet site and context. It was then peppered with collected objects discovered by Michael and Annabell on their travels”, the designers stated. Inspired by the contrasts revealed by the island of Mykonos (mainly its rocky, hot landscape juxtaposed by the invigorating the blue sea), the project tea envisioned a holistic retreat: “We wanted the place to be a stage that invites all aspects of Mykonos life but often with a concentrate on leisure. The style is inspired by natural components that set a laid back, down to earth and comfy backdrop for all the various activities that will take place there. It is a spot that simultaneously excites the senses and calms the soul.”

 

 

Photos by Carolin Saage

 


 

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https://thehardt.com/architecture/south-5th-residence-alterstudio-architecture/

https://thehardt.com/architecture/new-concrete-house-in-brissago-2013-by-wespi-de-meuron-romeo-architects/

 

https://thehardt.com/architecture/riverbank-house-kawabe-no-sumika-by-ma-style/

 

 


 

Plain Space Exhibition – John Pawson – Design Museum London 2010

Plain Space Exhibition – John Pawson – Design Museum London 2010

Plain Space Exhibition – John Pawson – Design Museum London 2010 | The Hardt

 

 


 

Plain Space Exhibition – John Pawson – Design Museum London 2010. The goal here was to communicate the thinking and give a sense of the body of work, whilst also engaging the widest possible audience. Since engagement is facilitated by first-hand experience, a site-specific, 1:1 installation was conceived as a key element — the first time anyone had constructed a building inside the Design Museum. As well as the more conventional curated content of an architectural show, the design incorporated subtle changes to the gallery space itself, on the basis that the success of the exhibition would not simply be a matter of the quality of the assembled material, but of the overall atmosphere, this spatial recalibration would generate.   

 


 

The team at Studio Hardie, based in Lewes, East Sussex, has a wide range of specialist expertise from cutting-edge design to age-old craft skills. In this post, Hamish Boden describes the challenges they faced when creating the ultimate modern exhibition space using traditional skills. This project was a 1:1 scale architectural installation to host the Plain Space exhibition for British architect John Pawson , described by the New York Times as “the father of modern architectural minimalism”.  The installation space was both a location for the exhibition and part of the event and was based at the Design Museum, London, in September 2010.  Hamish writes “This was one of Studio Hardie’s first full-scale architectural installations, essentially a building inside a building. The difficulty with achieving a crisp minimal look is that exposed fixings are not allowed so all the mechanics go on behind the scenes. Another major hurdle of the project was the timescale, achieving the level of tolerance and perfection on a really tight installation turnaround. The beauty of having such a big workshop is that you can create entire structures, test them check everything fits and make fine adjustments before leaving the workshop, this can save days of site work.

 

 


 

Spending time meticulously planning the install is critical; the choreography of how everything comes together quickly, accurately and beautifully. We couldn’t rely on ‘off the shelf’ being totally straight so we designed a new system for making dead flat-straight walls out of MDF torsion boxes. You often hear carpenters complaining about using MDF but for us it was a rare treat.  We are used to using solid timber that shrinks cracks and moves.  MDF, in contrast, is a very predictable and versatile material. It was a real challenge to create the curved ceiling.  We knew that constructing the sections on the floor would mean we could make a much better quality finish than working over-head. This is where modern technology meets classic old-fashioned carpentry knowledge. To get the perfect curve we had some roof fins cut with CNC and covered them with a thin sheet of MDF.

 

 

Photos: Gilbert McCarragher and Marco Zanta

Project Team Mark Treharne, Chris Masson, Nicholas Barba, Alison Morris

 


 

 

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Pergola (2014) by APOLLO Architects & Associates

Pergola (2014) by APOLLO Architects & Associates

Located in Sakura-ku, Japan, Pergola (2014) by APOLLO Architects & Associates | The Hardt

 

Located in Sakura-ku, Japan, Pergola (2014) by APOLLO Architects & Associates. The site is situated at the back of a parking lot rented out on a monthly basis, and we decided to provide no openings on the exterior façades to protect privacy. The house has a simple L-shaped plan, built around a covered entrance courtyard in the center, to decrease the construction cost. The covered courtyard, also used as an entrance approach, serves as an intermediate space between inside and outside. The main bedroom, located next to the entrance on the first floor, is a small private room with a sense of calmness. On the contrary, the children’s room is an open space located next to the courtyard, which can be appropriately adjusted and subdivided according to their growth. Skeleton stairs, which can also be appreciated as an art piece, are located in front of the main entrance, leading to the second floor. The second floor is comprised of an open space without partitions. Space is defined by the sequence of beautifully exposed wood ceiling rafters constituting the horizontal ceiling. The wood rafters extend outside and constitute a pergola above the entrance courtyard, integrating the interior and exterior spaces. The strip skylight window is located on the second-floor ceiling and one can enjoy the magnificent effect of natural light and shadow on the wall. LED lamps are embedded between the rafters, illuminating SPF structural members and ceiling panels and creating a dramatic gradation of light. The exterior pergola is lit up from below, creating a floating feeling at night.

 

 

© Masao Nishikawa

 


 

 

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Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz

Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz

Located in Zapallar, Chile, Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz | The Hardt

 

Located in Zapallar, Chile, Aguas Claras House (2009) by Ramon Coz + Benjamin Ortiz. The house is inserted in the terrain taking advantage of the panoramic views and topography. A perpendicular slope towards the sights and the main volume define two levels which are linked by a single vertical element, the black-edged stone chimney that goes through both floors. Access at the top level leads to major facilities: living, dining, kitchen areas and master bedroom, accompanied with two wind protected terraces and a balcony running across all its length, defined by the recessed glass windows in its west view. The lower level contains five bedrooms and a family room.

 

 


 

The immediate surroundings and the panoramic views towards the ocean’s horizon, determine the main building programme to open its body parallel to this gifted sight, while all circulations take place around the building’s forest sides. The said situation defines two distinctly different sides; it comes forward with a fully glazed facade that opens entirely to the sea views when the back entrance is defined with a sealed facade, worked out with timber sleepers interspersed with glass, giving partial views of the woods.

 

 

 

© Sergio Pirrone

 

 


 

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