The Hardt Atrium House 2010 by Tham Videga%CC%8Ard Arkitekter 02 e1522779017436 Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter Architecture Decor Furniture Interior Design Minimal View  wabi sabi Tham and Videgård Arkitekter sweden Snow Nature modern landscape Åke E: son Lindman   Image of Atrium House 2010 by Tham Videga%CC%8Ard Arkitekter 02 e1522779017436

Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter

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Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter located in Gotland, Sweden | The Hardt

 

Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter located in Gotland, Sweden. Atrium House is a vacation home for a family of three generations on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. It is built on a slight ridge that marks the former location of the coastline a thousand years ago. In relation to the open and expansive landscape, the building seems more like a low wall than a house. It is built around a completely enclosed atrium courtyard that is designed to serve as a fixed point, a sheltered outdoor room. The rest of the property is left undisturbed as a meadow where grazing sheep prevent the land from returning to forest.


The house is narrow, but its openings facing out are wide, giving the interior the character of a niche like a shelter in the open space of the landscape. While the roof maintains a consistent elevation throughout the house, the interior floor rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding terrain. This means the height of the ceiling varies within the main spaces, which are arranged in a continuous ring around the atrium. Within this continuous space, the smaller rooms are assembled in a number of solid blocks.

 

 


Inspired by the impressive materiality of Gotland’s vernacular agricultural architecture, the masonry construction has a natural plaster color that has been mixed with carbon black, exterior metal parts made of oxidized zinc, and oak doors as well as windows that have been treated with tar oil. The large sliding glass windows are mounted on the surface of the exterior walls, according to the same principle as many barn doors. Also, the interior doors are surface‐mounted, allowing the walls to appear unbroken.

 

© Åke E: son Lindman

 

I try to keep this site free of lackluster projects and try my best to focus solely on above-average projects and art exhibits – catch some more vibes like this Swedish meatball with these projects I handpicked for you;


 

The Hardt V Lodge Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter 2 Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter Architecture Decor Furniture Interior Design Minimal View  wabi sabi Tham and Videgård Arkitekter sweden Snow Nature modern landscape Åke E: son Lindman   Image of V Lodge Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter 2

V-Lodge (2013) by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter

Located in Ål, Norway, V-Lodge (2013) by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter | The Hardt

 

 

Located in Ål, Norway, V-Lodge (2013) by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter. This all-year cabin is located in the mountains above the village Ål, amidst cross-country ski tracks in winter and hiking tracks in summer. It is well suited for the family of five and designed to accommodate changes in family composition and a mix of generations in the years to come. The project has had a particular ambition to adapt to the existing topography and natural surroundings while taking advantage of the beneficial opportunities of the site. Simplicity and restraint characterize the lodge in its form, program, and materials. The building consists of two bodies united in a V-shaped plan with a south-facing glazed wall at its chamfered intersection. The main branch accommodates the entrance hall and combined dining, kitchen, and living zones, orientated in parallel with the contours of the topography. The second branch contains a bathroom, three bedrooms and a youth lodge at the far end, each on stepped levels in alignment with the falling terrain. The exterior is entirely clad in pre-patinated heart pine on the walls and pitched roofs, providing a homogenous skin that blends in with its surroundings.

 

 

 


 

The interior is simple but refined: walls, ceiling, and fixed furniture are finished with bare plywood sheets, and the combined fireplace and kitchen counter are cast in-situ concrete. Glazed openings from floor to ceiling provides ample daylight and transparency to the outside, culminating with the glazed section at the joint of the two branches. While admitting the high sun above the forested crest, its focal point is the forest floor at the base of the hill. A comfortable sitting niche provides the optimal place for relaxation and contemplation. Each bedroom is accessed through sliding doors along a narrow hallway of steps descending with the terrain and ending at a youth lounge with views through its glazed gable end wall. The cabin’s gentle intervention on the site creates small microclimate zones with beneficial sun conditions for outdoor activities and easy access from the interior. Its form reinterprets local and national building traditions, with materials that match and complement the montane birch forest and quality of light.

 

© Søren Harder Nielsen

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


The Hardt Mountain Cabin Marte.Marte Architekten 7 Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter Architecture Decor Furniture Interior Design Minimal View  wabi sabi Tham and Videgård Arkitekter sweden Snow Nature modern landscape Åke E: son Lindman   Image of Mountain Cabin Marte.Marte Architekten 7

Mountain Cabin (2011) by Marte.Marte Architekten

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Mountain Cabin (2011) by Marte.Marte Architekten, located in Laterns, Austria | The Hardt

 

Mountain Cabin (2011) by Marte.Marte Architekten, located in Laterns, Austria. At the edge of a wooded ravine, beneath the imposing wooden house of the Catholic Community of Sisters, the small tower building rises from the steep hillside. Striking and modest in appearance, it stretches up out of a small hollow situated on a narrow path along the edge of the forest. The only change made to the hillside is the driveway and the terrain has been left in its original form. Fitting into the landscape as if it were a barn, the building, which is a fine example of the homogeneous use of materials, in this case, carefully hewn rough concrete, stands out against the meadow green and winter white. Its ashy-gray color only contrasts slightly with the heavy oak front doors and the anthracite-colored handrails blend in with the branches of the surrounding forest. As if they were punched into the walls, the square windows of different sizes are spread out across the walls, and their full effect is only achieved at the corners.

 


 

The integration of the outer surfaces requested by the client is a kind of artifice. At the entry level, which is accessible via a flight a steps, the structure narrows down to two supporting corner columns, which not only provides guests with the unique opportunity to look through the building while at the same time enjoying a panorama view of the surrounding landscape, the whole time protected from the elements, but also lends the entrance a sense of significance. Inside the column, a spiral staircase connects the living area on the upper level with the two more private areas on the lower level, where the bedrooms and relaxation areas are interlocked like a puzzle. Semantically speaking, this gesture of the tower creates archetypes of fortified structures and abstract computer figures in your mind’s eye, making the tower seem familiar and strange at one and the same time.

 


 

Inside, the openings punched into the double-walled concrete shell are transformed into framed landscape paintings by wide, matte solid oak window frames that do not take up much wall space. These framed windows direct the guest’s attention to the prominent mountain chain, the gentle slopes, and the dense forest grove. Besides the raw concrete surfaces and the untreated oak floors, doors and fixtures, the black metal surfaces complement the harmonious, austere combination of materials. The client and architects haven’t built a flimsy holiday house, but instead a place of retreat that will remain standing for generations, despite any forthcoming changes of climate and landscape.

 

© Marc Lins

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


The Hardt Casa Invisible Delugan Meissl Associated Architects 06 Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter Architecture Decor Furniture Interior Design Minimal View  wabi sabi Tham and Videgård Arkitekter sweden Snow Nature modern landscape Åke E: son Lindman   Image of Casa Invisible Delugan Meissl Associated Architects 06

Casa Invisible (2013) by Delugan Meissl Associated Architects

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Casa Invisible (2013) by Delugan Meissl Associated Architects situated in Austria | The Hardt

 

Casa Invisible (2013) by Delugan Meissl Associated Architects situated in Austria. Casa Invisible is a flexible housing unit, which consists of a prefabricated wood structure designed for turnkey implementation at any designated site. Maximum flexibility and spatial quality are the key elements in its concept of development. The open layout is structured by a chimney and a wet cell creating three spatial units that provide for the individual use and design. The structure and ambience
of the rooms are characterized by the use of domestic woods. The mounting framework and fitments of the housing unit are exclusively assembled from prefabricated elements at the factory. The overall dimensions are 47 ft (14.50) x 11 ft (3.5 meters) which provides for easy transportation by lorry. Design and texture of the interior design and façade can be determined by the client from various options listed in
a design catalog. This provides for tailor-made design options for the housing units as well as for flexible pricing options.

 

 

 

 


 

Through modular element construction and the intensive use of wood, the housing units can be completely disassembled thus minimizing their environmental footprint. By combining innovation and mobility at a reasonable price, Casa Invisible is a product that offers a groundbreaking alternative to an increasingly critical housing situation. Key factors in this unique proposition are its uncomplicated assembly, its attractive price and the free choice of location. Compared to the cost-intensive and bureaucratic construction of a conventional house, these represent the main assets of Casa Invisible.
© Christian Brandstaetter

 

 


 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


 

The Hardt THE HARDT NEW LOGO Atrium House (2010) by Tham and Videgård Arkitekter Architecture Decor Furniture Interior Design Minimal View  wabi sabi Tham and Videgård Arkitekter sweden Snow Nature modern landscape Åke E: son Lindman   Image of THE HARDT NEW LOGO

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