Linear House (2015) by Palinda Kannangara Architects

Linear House (2015) by Palinda Kannangara Architects

Asher 6:45 am 6:45 am

Situated in Battaramulla, Rajagiriya, Sri Lanka, Linear House (2015) by Palinda Kannangara Architects | The Hardt

 

Situated in Battaramulla, Rajagiriya, Sri Lanka, Linear House (2015) by Palinda Kannangara Architects. Located in the busy Battaramulla area close to the Sri Lankan Parliament, the low-budget single family house designed by Palinda Kannangara Architects stands on a narrow plot. The house has been designed to provide a feeling of being connected to tropics, nature, and trees despite being in a busy and residential neighborhood. The entrance forecourt is paved with the lone existing sapodilla tree as the focus. The designed was meant to provide the couple with the feeling of living within a garden. A series of courtyards link together indoor and outdoor: the inner living room space can totally open out into the exterior pond and garden through large sliding doors. The ground level comprises of a living-dining space intersected by a courtyard with Syzygium trees, a kitchen, and a guest bedroom. The first floor hosts a TV lounge, a master bedroom and two additional bedrooms.  Slender wood bridges cut through the courtyards treetops and lead to the two bedrooms. The master bedroom has a double screen with an exterior balcony that overlooks the sapodilla tree. The timber screen provides filtered light and shade keeping the interiors cool. The uppermost level comprises of a roof garden that not only captures stormwater and favors a microclimate within the house. It also acts as an outdoor garden space for the couple to enjoy quiet dinners and to entertain.

 

 

 

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Matale Holiday Retreat (2009) by Thisara Thanapathy Associates

Matale Holiday Retreat (2009) by Thisara Thanapathy Associates

Asher 8:33 pm 12:50 am

Matale Holiday Retreat (2009) by Thisara Thanapathy Associates located in Matale, Sri Lanka. The building is positioned to create an immense enclosure of space between the building and encircling crescent of mountains across the valley.


The building is linear in form. It does not dominate the landscape but tries to be a gentle noticeable part of it. This thin form does minimum damage to the vegetation while allowing the sun and rain to fall on the ground. All this minimizes the damage to the ecology. By being on pillars it allows the breezes to cool the building. Timber grills used on either side of the upper-level bedrooms provide ample natural ventilation. A thin metal roof with its long eaves shades the building.
 

Salvaged materials are used for the building. These salvaged materials had been purchased prior to designing the building. Steel and timber grills were salvaged from a demolished factory. The decks are out of salvaged railway sleepers. Rest of the timber was purchased from the locality. There are only two main masonry walls, except the peripheral walls of the toilets.
 

 


 
The building is approached via a long walkway by the side of an elongated wall. At the end of the long walkway begins a viewing deck which is perpendicular to it. This viewing deck is pierced through the building and is in the center of the vast space between the mountain range and the building enabling the user to fully experience it. This viewing deck is orientated towards a patch of paddy field, which is a significant feature of this landscape.

While the building tries to capture different views from the dining room and the bedrooms, it is the extreme end of the significant deck that provides the dramatic experience of an encompassing space defined by the mountain range and the building.
The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando

The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando

Asher 12:35 pm 1:06 am

The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando | The Hardt

 

As we’ve gone over before, I am always hesitant to post Tadao Ando’s work, mainly because I never feel like I’ll do the project justice it deserves, presenting it to you all. He is by far my favorite architect and the fact that he’s self-taught is one of the most inspiring aspects of him and his work as I have no formal education or experience in architecture, art or design, everything is intuitive and learning by doing. Anyways, The House in Sri Lanka, or so-called by the Japanese architect Tadao Ando who designed it, is set against a paradise on earth. White sandy beaches, dotted with coconut palm trees and huts draped with leaves from these trees, weave in and out of cliffs in Mirissa, located at the southern tip of Sri Lanka. Crocodiles and water snakes splash in its rivers, black monkeys, wild elephants and even leopards roam freely on its land. Local fishermen languorously wait for fish to swim towards them on wooden sticks firmly wedged into the sand along the edge of the sea. The name of the house is perhaps enough to suggest its majestic presence: clad in exposed concrete, the house perches on top of a cliff, as if it were indeed a leopard whose claws edge towards the Indian Ocean. The house was a gift from a husband to a wife. Sri Lanka has been the Belgian couple’s home for the past 30 years.

 

 

 

 

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