Tramuntana House by Perretta Arquitectura

Tramuntana House by Perretta Arquitectura

Tramuntana House by Perretta Arquitectura located in Bétera, Spain  | The Hardt

Tramuntana House by Perretta Arquitectura located in Bétera, Spain. Tramuntana House is a two-story residential structure that features clean lines and sharp edges. Its east orientation is open, with huge glass walls that allow indoor-outdoor interplay. The house is finished in concrete. This contributes to its modern, contemporary vibe. The Tramuntana house is one of the most unique homes that can be seen from the golf club, in Torre en Conill. The house is totally turned over to it, it is distributed over two floors, where only the bedroom in the suite is available on the upper floor. The house consists of a set of planes that fold up forming the rooms, the vertical ones are cut obliquely giving the whole a remarkable singularity and making the house a prow pointing to the winds coming from the Tramuntana.

 

 

 

 

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Mejiro House (2004) by MDS Architectural Studio

Mejiro House (2004) by MDS Architectural Studio

Mejiro House (2004) by MDS Architectural Studio located in Toshima-ku, Tokyo, Japan | The Hardt

 

Mejiro House (2004) by MDS Architectural Studio located in Toshima-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Residential areas in densely populated downtown Tokyo tend to be claustrophobic and closed off, with individual plots surrounded by high walls to ensure privacy, and a concerted effort to avoid having windows facing the road. Ideally, though, aren’t houses supposed to maintain a certain openness with regard to the surrounding neighborhood while protecting the privacy of their inhabitants and admitting light and air into their interior? For this project, the first thing we did was to position the living room – often regarded as the part of the house that requires the most light – in the basement, which is normally considered to be an especially tricky area to ensure adequate sunlight exposure in.

 

 


 

A stairwell leading to the first floor above this basement was then installed. Although this stairwell adjoins a dry area that faces the road outside, a landscaped greenbelt along the dry area positioned roughly at shoulder height helps to ensure a sense of privacy from passers-by. The result is a pleasant underground space that is both brightly lit and well ventilated. The first story, which features one entrance for each of the two private lanes leading up to the house, is laid out like a gallery space that encircles the stairwell leading up from the basement. Thanks to the configuration of the exterior, a sense of openness to the exterior extend throughout the entire first floor, which is continuous with the urban streetscape outside (and from which one can catch a glimpse of both the exterior and interior of the house).

 

 


 

In addition to functioning as an entrance, this open plan first floor is also a point of connection to the private family zone in the basement and the intimate private area on the upper floor.” Although construction fees for the basement were high, the proactive use of this underground space proved to be extremely effective in the context of Tokyo’s high land prices. The angle and intensity of the sunlight that enters through the skylight at the top of the staircase and dry area changes according to the season, time of day, and weather, reaching as far down as the basement level. The result is a basement space located within a dense residential area that still manages to be open and comfortable.”

 

 


 

 

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I HOUSE by Kubota Architects located in Hatsukaichi, Hiroshima, Japan

I HOUSE by Kubota Architects located in Hatsukaichi, Hiroshima, Japan

I HOUSE by Kubota Architects located in Hatsukaichi, Hiroshima, Japan | The Hardt

 

 

I HOUSE by Kubota Architects located in Hatsukaichi. Hiroshima, Japan. The unbelievably gorgeous minimalist dreamboat of a house was built in between 2001-2003. The 1,660 1,660 ft² (154 m²) reinforced concrete, partly steel flamed gem sits on a 2,852 ft² (265 m²) site with completely unobstructed views of the harbor.

 

 

 

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V House by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos

V House by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos

V House by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos situated in Guadalajara, Jalisco, México | The Hardt

 

V House by Abraham Cota Paredes Arquitectos situated in Guadalajara, Jalisco, México. Completed in 2015, the patio in the 3,821 ft² (355 m²) home became the Hardt of the house, and articulates public and private areas, providing lighting and ventilation. In the patio, there is a body of water with a tree, which captures light from the south, through a kind of chimney that blends the light. The land is located in the limit of a closed condominium, with a height difference of 8 meters at the back, which allows us to release the views to the east of the metropolitan area of Guadalajara. To take advantage of the location, the plant plays a staggered, making the space to expand, as the visitor walks deeper into the house. A large window frames the horizon but preserving privacy due to the change in ground level. In the middle of the field, a patio, which will become the heart of the house, articulates public and private areas, providing lighting and ventilation. In the patio there is a body of water with a tree, which captures light from the south, through a kind of chimney that blends the light A wooden cross reminiscent Barragan, seems to float in space, framing the patio.  Water, tree, and light, fill the space with an aura of serenity.

 

 


 

The double height of the 3 levels is concatenated, creating a spatial continuity or fluidity. Upstairs, the master bedroom face to the east of the city. Leading the field, facing the neighboring houses, 2 bedrooms are placed. United through a balcony, which allows correctly orient your windows, protecting them from the heat of the setting sun. Formally the house seeks to be solid with the least possible subtractions. Two subtractions generate the main facade. Downstairs, the entrance and garage, and a balcony, which in turn opens onto the street and the sky. Upstairs, a cantilevered staircase leads to the terrace, which seeks to preserve the essence of the regional architecture. Contained by walls and a steel structure which in the future will be covered with plants. The terrace opens to the east, allowing you to enjoy a panoramic view of the city.

 

© César Béjar

 


 

 

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Owl House (2017) by BAAG

Owl House (2017) by BAAG

Located in Gonnet, Argentina, Owl House (2017) by BAAG | The Hardt

 

Located in Gonnet, Argentina, Owl House (2017) by BAAG Within the framework of the housing loan program Pro.Cre.Ar, the project is being implemented in the outskirts of the city of La Plata (Prov. Bs. As.) In a still undeveloped area. It is part of the double challenge of colonizing an extensive land expanding a house that could not surpass 1,400  ft² (130 m²), but considering the future consolidation of the fabric and its urban responses.

 


 

In addition, it was proposed to create outdoor spaces with different atmospheres: a more contained interior patio but in turn, the house will take advantage of the ground and the liberated view. Faced with the frequency of flooding of the site and the proximity of a stream, the need to raise part of the house was raised. In this way, the public and the private part (bedrooms) articulated by a single roof slope are divided. The house is made up of the combination of an industrialized and standardized system (a structure of metal profiling makes support) that accelerates the construction times by responding to the terms required by the credit, and a masonry system that allows to use the hand of local work.

 

 

 

A series of brick modules defined according to their orientation make up combined walls of exposed bricks and hollow ceramics, generating insulating walls to the south and accumulators to the north. These modules of bricks arranged in tambourine and a series of regulated winnowing, prioritize the thermal conditioning and calibrate the openings towards the patio and the views to the exterior forming the envelope of the house.\ via ArchDaily

 

 

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