Villa Rotonda (2010) by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten

Villa Rotonda (2010) by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten

Asher 5:14 pm 8:47 pm

Located in Goirle, North Brabant, Netherlands, Villa Rotonda (2010) by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten | The Hardt

 

Located in Goirle, North Brabant, Netherlands, Villa Rotonda (2010) by Bedaux de Brouwer Architecten. A striking combination of contemporary traditionalism and artisanal innovation. The swimming pool, sauna, and hot tub are clear indications of extravagance in this living arrangement in Goirle, a district in the region of the city of Tilburg, in the south of the Netherlands. In any case, the solace of this house is offered by these extravagant conveniences, as well as essentially by its building design.

 


 

Manor Rotonda was planned by the youthful designers Pieter and Thomas Bedaux, who are proceeding with the convention of the department in Goirle which was begun in the 1930s by their granddad Jos Bedaux and assumed control by their dad Peer Bedaux. Since the 1950s, the authority has been concentrating on two streams: a contemporary traditionalism and an artisanal innovation. In both territories, security and solace have a huge impact. Starting thereof perspective, the conventional houses with their pitched rooftops and covered windows are not all that not quite the same as the peaceful, conceptual structural planning which the department has additionally been making for a considerable length of time. The living arrangement in Goirle consolidates both headings.

 


 

From the road, the house looks conventional and shut, from the patio nursery it uncovers itself as a transparent space. The conventional look was directed by the zoning arrangement, which indicated a rooftop which would permit the new building to fit in with the provincial climate of Goirle – an environment, by the way, which has been resolved to a critical degree by the work of the granddad and father Bedaux. With the exception of two extensive windows, the house is shut off to the primary road, shielding the inhabitants from the clamor contamination brought about by the movement from the adjacent occupied circuitous. This additionally clarifies the name of the house, Villa Rotonda. As opposed to a reference to Andrea Palladio’s popular manor close to Vicenza, Italy, it is an unexpected discourse on the house’s area by a circuitous crossing point. The water somewhat encompassing the house strengthens its private, fixed off the character.

 

 


 

From the road, the house looks conventional and shut, from the patio nursery it uncovers itself as a transparent space. The conventional look was directed by the zoning arrangement, which indicated a rooftop which would permit the new building to fit in with the provincial climate of Goirle – an environment, by the way, which has been resolved to a critical degree by the work of the granddad and father Bedaux. With the exception of two extensive windows, the house is shut off to the primary road, shielding the inhabitants from the clamor contamination brought about by the movement from the adjacent occupied circuitous. This additionally clarifies the name of the house, Villa Rotonda. As opposed to a reference to Andrea Palladio’s popular manor close to Vicenza, Italy, it is an unexpected discourse on the house’s area by a circuitous crossing point. The water somewhat encompassing the house strengthens its private, fixed off the character.

 


 

The choice to utilize the moderate variation of CS 68 with concealed vents accentuates the dynamic look of this house with its downplayed plan, in which the presence of straightforwardness is not just found in the windows. This profits, in theory, enumerating of the point where the divider meets the rooftop. The naturally worked sliding entryways and windows are a piece of an amazing cluster of home hardware which serves to further expand the solace level effectively inalienable in the structural engineering itself. Every room in the house confronts the extensive greenery enclosure. With the shut-off roadside façade guarding the back of the house, it is conceivable to appreciate both utter security and light, open living. Thusly, with the outline of the house, the two youthful engineers have accomplished an ideal blend of two universes, cutting edge and conventional, in this manner demonstrating that they are deserving of following in the strides of their ancestors in the workplace.

 

Photography is by Michel Kievits

 


 

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House DM by Lensass Architects

House DM by Lensass Architects

Asher 12:40 am 8:51 pm

Located in Moerdijk, The Netherlands, House DM by Lensass Architects | The Hardt

 

Located in Moerdijk, The Netherlands, House DM by Lensass Architects. A farm in the sloping Pajottenland landscape becomes a private family home and veterinary practice. A masoned brick shaft that connects the practice, the private, home and the garden brings order to a cluster of existing buildings. The shaft was nicknamed ‘the rabbit hole’. It leads to an inside yard, which is also finished in brickwork. From the higher location of the castle of Gaasbeek, the brick roofing of the rabbit hole can easily be spotted. Just like the castle, it has become a visually strong and culturally defining element in the landscape. Once inside the house, other unexpected surprises await the visitor’s eye. Even the smallest of windows frames the age-old landscape with its seventeenth-century castle. Architecture and surroundings are splendidly interlaced. The effect is so natural that it seems to have been shaped by nature and history alone.

 

 

 

 

© Philippe van Gelooven

 


 

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Villa RR (2017) by Reitsema and Partners Architects

Villa RR (2017) by Reitsema and Partners Architects

Asher 5:46 am 8:51 pm

Villa RR (2017) by Reitsema and Partners Architects situated in Rijssen, The Netherlands | The Hardt

 

Villa RR (2017) by Reitsema and Partners Architects situated in Rijssen, The Netherlands.  How do you transform a 50-year-old villa into a comfortable, contemporary, sustainable home? To find the answer, the architect Theo Reitsema and the interior designer Stephanie Weitering, who are married to each other, spent a year living in a 1967-built house in the Dutch community of Rijssen, looking, listening and feeling. They and their two young children settled in the villa, set in the middle of the forest. Together they explored the possibilities presented by the house and its location. Reitsema and Weitering made discoveries during that first year that would inform the house’s transformation. For instance, the family occupied the villa through all seasons. Living on a hill in the forest means you’re surrounded by greenery in summer. Since the thick foliage provides shade, the house doesn’t need any sun protection or air conditioning beyond an overhang on the west side. And in winter, the low sun warms the house and its occupants can see for hundreds of meters through the branches.

 


 

During the metamorphosis, Reitsema and Weitering took full advantage of Villa RR’s hilltop position. The house comprises two stories on the east side and one on the west. The application of dark stucco to the lower floor, which contains a double garage and a home office, turned it into a sort of plinth for the floor above, where the living and sleeping areas are located. The upper story is given a distinctive appearance by a new wooden facade, which is relatively close on the east side and fully open on the west. The front door marks the transition between the two sections. A playful outdoor staircase gives the entrance extra appeal.

 

 


 

Reitsema and Weitering might not have thought of building the house lengthwise on the deep lot, precisely along the east-west axis. But they applaud the decision by the original architect, J. Abma. The house’s orientation allows for views of both the north and south sides of the garden from the living room. To maximise enjoyment of the landscape, Villa RR has been extended with a glass volume at the western end. The roof is supported by four slender (38mm) chromed columns that reflect the landscape, enhancing the panoramic views from the living room.

 


 

The transformation has kept the living spaces on the west side of the house and the bedrooms on the east. Between the bedrooms and the living room is the garden room. In contrast to the light, airy living room, the garden room is more enclosed. The use of timber cladding continues on the garden room’s walls, transforming it into a veranda when the bi-fold doors are opened fully and creating a smooth transition between the interior and the flower garden. The architects have taken a number of steps to ensure that the house will continue to provide a high level of comfort in the future. They have installed a heat recovery system, triple glazing, high-quality insulation, LED lighting and energy-efficient appliances, making Villa RR nearly energy-neutral and ready for the next 50 years.

 

© Ronald Tilleman

 


 

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Home 11 by i29 Interior Architects

Home 11 by i29 Interior Architects

Asher 7:18 pm 3:19 am

Situated in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Home 11 by i29 Interior Architects

 

Situated in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Home 11 by i29 Interior Architects. A formerly garage space in Amsterdam’s area de Pijp turned into a spacious house naturally lit by large roof lights. The interior with a generous 2,475 ft² (230 m²) on1st floor, is finished in a simple material palette. The repetition of rectangular rough oak wooden surfaces is in great contrast with the stark white walls, black surfaces and grey cast flooring. The custom designed kitchen includes a large wooden sliding door to cover integrated storage areas, with a contrasting black cooking island in front. Built-in cabinets and a fireplace have the same characteristics and contrast in materials. Wooden walls from top to bottom with built-in doors are marking the entrance to the more private areas such as bed- and bathrooms.

 

 


 

Outdoors is a patio in between the living- and master bedroom. In order to connect inside and out, i29 interior architects designed a 20 m2 hand-knotted carpet with a natural mossy pattern. The excess of natural light in combination with the soft layer of green and beige resembles the outdoor experience while being inside.

 

© Ewout Huibers

 


 

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Villa 4.0, ‘t Gooi (2011) by Mecanoo

Villa 4.0, ‘t Gooi (2011) by Mecanoo

Asher 2:58 pm 12:50 am

Located in Hilversum, The Netherlands, Villa 4.0, ‘t Gooi (2011) by Mecanoo | The Hardt

 

Located in Hilversum, The Netherlands, Villa 4.0, ‘t Gooi (2011) by Mecanoo. A bungalow in Naarden built in 1967 was extended and transformed by Dick van Gameren into a contemporary villa. The visionary design led to a timeless house that reflects the personalities and needs of its owners. Previous renovations closed off the original heart of the house from the living space and entrance hall. The renovation restores the relationship between the landscape and the house that had disappeared over the years. Sustainability also played an important role. This renovation marks the fourth version of the house. Using the existing structure as a basis, the elevations and roofs were updated.

 

 


 

Insulating materials were added and windows and facade elements were replaced. Removing the walls in the center of the villa created space for a new living hall that overlooks the landscape on four sides. Two geometric roof constructions with skylights contribute to a spacious and light atmosphere. Adjacent to the living hall, a new glass pavilion extends towards the flowing stream. A fruitful collaboration with various partners ensured the sustainable ambitions of the house were fulfilled. As part of the garden design by Michael van Gessel, felled trees from the site were stored as firewood for the ultra-efficient wood-burning stove in the kitchen. A heat pump, solar water heating system and LED lighting address all other energy-intensive requirements such as the heating, cooling, hot water and electricity. IDing designed the timeless interior to echo the architecture.

 

© Pedro Kok

 


 

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