House DM by Lensass Architects

House DM by Lensass Architects

Located in Moerdijk, The Netherlands, House DM by Lensass Architects | The Hardt

 

Located in Moerdijk, The Netherlands, House DM by Lensass Architects. A farm in the sloping Pajottenland landscape becomes a private family home and veterinary practice. A masoned brick shaft that connects the practice, the private, home and the garden brings order to a cluster of existing buildings. The shaft was nicknamed ‘the rabbit hole’. It leads to an inside yard, which is also finished in brickwork. From the higher location of the castle of Gaasbeek, the brick roofing of the rabbit hole can easily be spotted. Just like the castle, it has become a visually strong and culturally defining element in the landscape. Once inside the house, other unexpected surprises await the visitor’s eye. Even the smallest of windows frames the age-old landscape with its seventeenth-century castle. Architecture and surroundings are splendidly interlaced. The effect is so natural that it seems to have been shaped by nature and history alone.

 

 

 

 

© Philippe van Gelooven

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


Villa RR (2017) by Reitsema and Partners Architects

Villa RR (2017) by Reitsema and Partners Architects situated in Rijssen, The Netherlands | The Hardt

 

Villa RR (2017) by Reitsema and Partners Architects situated in Rijssen, The Netherlands.  How do you transform a 50-year-old villa into a comfortable, contemporary, sustainable home? To find the answer, the architect Theo Reitsema and the interior designer Stephanie Weitering, who are married to each other, spent a year living in a 1967-built house in the Dutch community of Rijssen, looking, listening and feeling. They and their two young children settled in the villa, set in the middle of the forest. Together they explored the possibilities presented by the house and its location. Reitsema and Weitering made discoveries during that first year that would inform the house’s transformation. For instance, the family occupied the villa through all seasons. Living on a hill in the forest means you’re surrounded by greenery in summer. Since the thick foliage provides shade, the house doesn’t need any sun protection or air conditioning beyond an overhang on the west side. And in winter, the low sun warms the house and its occupants can see for hundreds of meters through the branches.

 


 

During the metamorphosis, Reitsema and Weitering took full advantage of Villa RR’s hilltop position. The house comprises two stories on the east side and one on the west. The application of dark stucco to the lower floor, which contains a double garage and a home office, turned it into a sort of plinth for the floor above, where the living and sleeping areas are located. The upper story is given a distinctive appearance by a new wooden facade, which is relatively close on the east side and fully open on the west. The front door marks the transition between the two sections. A playful outdoor staircase gives the entrance extra appeal.

 

 


 

Reitsema and Weitering might not have thought of building the house lengthwise on the deep lot, precisely along the east-west axis. But they applaud the decision by the original architect, J. Abma. The house’s orientation allows for views of both the north and south sides of the garden from the living room. To maximise enjoyment of the landscape, Villa RR has been extended with a glass volume at the western end. The roof is supported by four slender (38mm) chromed columns that reflect the landscape, enhancing the panoramic views from the living room.

 


 

The transformation has kept the living spaces on the west side of the house and the bedrooms on the east. Between the bedrooms and the living room is the garden room. In contrast to the light, airy living room, the garden room is more enclosed. The use of timber cladding continues on the garden room’s walls, transforming it into a veranda when the bi-fold doors are opened fully and creating a smooth transition between the interior and the flower garden. The architects have taken a number of steps to ensure that the house will continue to provide a high level of comfort in the future. They have installed a heat recovery system, triple glazing, high-quality insulation, LED lighting and energy-efficient appliances, making Villa RR nearly energy-neutral and ready for the next 50 years.

 

© Ronald Tilleman

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 


Home 11 by i29 Interior Architects

Home 11 by i29 Interior Architects

Situated in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Home 11 by i29 Interior Architects. A formerly garage space in Amsterdam’s area de Pijp turned into a spacious house naturally lit by large roof lights. The interior with a generous 2,475 ft² (230 m²) on1st floor, is finished in a simple material palette. The repetition of rectangular rough oak wooden surfaces is in great contrast with the stark white walls, black surfaces and grey cast flooring. 


The custom designed kitchen includes a large wooden sliding door to cover integrated storage areas, with a contrasting black cooking island in front. Built-in cabinets and a fireplace have the same characteristics and contrast in materials. Wooden walls from top to bottom with built-in doors are marking the entrance to the more private areas such as bed- and bathrooms.
 
 

Outdoors is a patio in between the living- and master bedroom. In order to connect inside and out, i29 interior architects designed a 20 m2 hand-knotted carpet with a natural mossy pattern. The excess of natural light in combination with the soft layer of green and beige resembles the outdoor experience while being inside.
 
 
© Ewout Huibers
 

Villa Kogelhof (2013) by Paul de Ruiter Architects

Villa Kogelhof (2013) by Paul de Ruiter Architects

Villa Kogelhof (2013) by Paul de Ruiter Architects located in Noord-Beveland, Netherlands | The Hardt

 

Villa Kogelhof (2013) by Paul de Ruiter Architects located in Noord-Beveland, Netherlands. The 25-hectare estate is part of a larger program initiated by the government, which aims to connect regional ecological zones throughout the country. The current owner bought the site, once farmland, in 2006. It is a protected habitat for animals and plants and a major tourist draw in the area, open to the public. Permission to build a house on the land was given only on condition that it was returned to its pre-agricultural state. The planting of some 71,000 six-year-old trees hint at the future of the estate as ‘a villa in the woods’ and was planted already in 2006. A rectangular pond was dug, requiring the removal of 70,000 cubic meters of soil.

 

 


 

The underground volume of the house consists of the entrance, parking (for 6 cars and a tractor), storage, bathroom and a workspace which looks out over the pond. The living area is situated in the floating glass box above ground. Its floor plan is completely open, except for some subtle glass room dividers. There are several separate volumes for the kitchen, bedrooms, bathroom and a multifunctional room. The patio has glass doors on both sides so that it’s both accessible through the living room and the bathroom. The entire floor is covered with white epoxy and the furniture consists of designer classics from Le Corbusier and Eileen Grey. The façade is completely made out of glass and offers a spectacular view over the surrounding landscape.

 


 

One of the main principles of Villa Kogelhof was to translate luxury into the happiness of independence. The goal for the villa was to be self-sufficient; to generate its own energy, to heat its own water and to recycle the garbage. To make sure Villa Kogelhof is energy neutral, the façade offers an important contribution. This so-called climate-façade is composed of an outer layer of clear insulated glass from floor to ceiling and an inner layer of sun-reflecting fabric that can be rolled up and unrolled. When the fabric is lowered, an air cavity is formed in which the air from the villa is extracted from a central ventilation system. The house is heated by a central heating system in combination with an air pump. Warm water will in the near future be generated by using a range stove, in which wood will be fired from the trees out of the private forest of the estate. Electricity is generated from the PV-cells on the roof and also from the planned windmill.

 

© Jeroen Musch

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

 


 

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