The Hardt Pear Tree House 2012 by Edgley Design 344 1080x675 Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design Architecture Concrete Courtyard Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern Video Wood  UK London Jack Hobhouse Edgley Design   Image of Pear Tree House 2012 by Edgley Design 344 1080x675

Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design

Asher 12:36 pm 12:36 pm

Situated in London, UK, Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design | The Hardt

 

Concrete Elegance: Pear Tree House by Edgley Design from The Building Centre on Vimeo.

 

Situated in London, UK, Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design. The concept began with a 100-year-old pear tree, a remnant of the site’s history as a Victorian fruit orchard. The house has been built around the tree, creating an internal courtyard that brings light and air to the center of the plan, while turning the house inward to remain private from the surrounding terraced houses. The site is long and thin, and the layout is arranged around the changing light of the day, with the kitchen looking to the northeast for morning light, the living areas looking southwest onto the pear tree courtyard for light from midday, and the lowered snug in the centre of the building as a cosy retreat in the evening. 

 

 

© Jack Hobhouse

 

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The Hardt Tiverton Road by Takero Shimazaki Architects t sa located in London UK w 1080x675 Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design Architecture Concrete Courtyard Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern Video Wood  UK London Jack Hobhouse Edgley Design   Image of Tiverton Road by Takero Shimazaki Architects t sa located in London UK w 1080x675

Tiverton Road by Takero Shimazaki Architects (t-sa)

Asher 11:34 pm 11:39 pm

Tiverton Road by Takero Shimazaki Architects (t-sa) located in London, UK | The Hardt

 

Tiverton Road by Takero Shimazaki Architects (t-sa) located in London, UK. Modestly veiled behind layers of silvering chestnut cladding, this monastic oasis, with courtyard garden, has recently been completed to a beautifully contemplative and tactile design by Takero Shimazaki Architects. The house can be found on Tiverton Road, a short walk from Kensal Rise, between the green spaces of Queen’s Park and Tiverton Green. Taking its inspiration from Turner’s ‘Interior of an Italian Church’ the house is intended as a sanctum from the modern world, its monolithic structure and measured pools of light a rare environment for focus and reflection. The design expertly marries light and lighting with a simple, textured palette of concrete, natural wood, and stone, echoing the Japanese philosophy of Wabi-Sabi.

 

 

Entry from the street is through the concealed door of a chestnut fence. A polished-concrete gallery, with a steel barrier to the courtyard void, continues through the arched opening of an entrance porch, into a hallway of bare plaster. To the left is the main bedroom, with a dramatic wall of shuttered concrete and two high-arched windows overlooking the courtyard garden below. To the right is a versatile room with sedum roof and large circular roof light. The corridor continues toward a study space, with a glass floor directly over the kitchen. Three roof lights, within a steep double-height mono-pitch, flood the space with light, with one opening electrically for ventilation. To the left is a bathroom with marble herringbone tiling, brass fittings and a reclaimed bird-bath stone sink with bespoke stand.

 

 

A brass handrail descends to the lower-ground floor alongside a wonderful concrete spiral staircase, lit from above by a high, arched window. The kitchen pairs Corian worktops with Dornbracht fittings and Miele appliances. Light comes from the glass floor above and an open porthole through to the staircase and dining room. Arched glazing opens from here onto a pebbled-courtyard garden with Japanese Acer tree and an outdoor shower. The living room also opens to the courtyard and between the two rooms is a utility room with washer/dryer, and a shower room with cement tiling and brass fittings. The house is brilliantly located between Kensal Rise and Queens Park. Both areas have an excellent selection of independent shops, cafes, pubs, and restaurants. There is a well-established farmers’ market that takes place every Sunday nearby. The green spaces of Queens Park are a short walk away, particularly popular with local families, whilst Tiverton Green is well known amongst dog walkers. The closest station is Kensal Rise, running London Overground services to Highbury & Islington and Stratford in on direction, and Richmond in the other. Nearby Queens Park is on the Bakerloo Line. The Westway provides easy road access out of London and Heathrow Airport.

 

Text via themodernhouse.com

 

 

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The Hardt Union Wharf by Nicholas Szczepaniak Architects located in London UK. 1080x1000 Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design Architecture Concrete Courtyard Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern Video Wood  UK London Jack Hobhouse Edgley Design   Image of Union Wharf by Nicholas Szczepaniak Architects located in London UK. 1080x1000

Union Wharf by Nicholas Szczepaniak Architects

Asher 8:04 pm 2:41 pm

Union Wharf by Nicholas Szczepaniak Architects, located in London, UK | The Hardt

 

Union Wharf by Nicholas Szczepaniak Architects, located in London, UK. Union Wharf is a mid terrace canal side property built within the footprint of a converted factory building. It is located along the Regents Canal in Islington, London. The aspiration of the project was to transform a dated, under-performing and compromised couple’s dwelling into a contemporary, energy efficient and spatially generous family home. Works consisted of a full refurbishment and remodel of the three-story property including the replacement and extension of an existing rooftop conservatory to transform it from an unusable storeroom into a contemporary habitable space that can be used all year round with an external terrace. The approach throughout the project was to use moderately priced materials, adding value through thoughtful, crafted details and care during execution

 

 


 

The footprint of the existing conservatory was increased to create a flexible space that can either be used as a guest suite, lounge and/ or study. Located along Regents Canal, the new rooftop structure is inspired by canal boats incorporating an enveloping oak and ash interior. As the rooftop expresses so much of the structure, Nicholas Szczepaniak Architects worked closely with Blue Engineering from an early design stage. Timber and steel flitched components create structural legibility adding rhythm and texture whilst enhancing the perception of volume. The layered south elevation maximizes light, views and enhances connectivity with the terrace and sky. It is articulated by 3 bespoke picture frames fabricated from 10mm steel plates that respond to the interior zoning of the space. The frames accommodate full height sliding glass doors as well as glare reducing steel cables strung vertically in tension in front of the glass to diffuse daylight.

 

The primary living space on the ground floor was reconfigured to resolve the disconnection of the kitchen, lounge and dining area whilst creating an open free flowing space. A sliding glass partition allows a new playroom to be concealed or connected when appropriate to the main living space. Bespoke rotating window shutters fabricated from fluted glass provide privacy from users of the canal towpath whilst maximizing natural light and views.

 

 


 

Inspired by the former industrial use of the building, the material palette incorporates raw and uncovered finishes such as the original concrete soffit, which contains the scars of where walls were located whilst the building was used as a factory. In contrast to this, elements such as the kitchen, fixtures, and fittings are precisely detailed, warm in color and texture to create a unique material palette with a contemporary yet homely atmosphere.

 

Photos by

© Nicholas Worley

 


 

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Richmond Avenue House by Lipton Architects

Asher 7:55 pm 8:47 pm

Richmond Avenue House by Lipton Architects located in London, UK | The Hardt

 

Richmond Avenue House by Lipton Architects located in London, UK. “Our unique process has transformed Richmond Avenue to create a site-specific result that is recognizably original, intelligently resolved, aesthetic, enduring and valuable. The creation of a two-story high glass rear addition playfully connects family life together. A double-height glass extension was designed to sit gracefully, transforming the introvert lower ground space, with its closed in corridors and segregated rooms, to an extrovert space that reaches out and makes connections with the garden and ground floor. A glazed tryptic – a ground floor balcony, an oriel stair seat and an internal study window – overlooks the double height space, creating playful and connected family spaces.” Lipton Architects

 

 

Photography: David Vintiner

 


 

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Private House by David Chipperfield Architects

Asher 8:48 pm 6:04 pm

Private House by David Chipperfield Architects located in London’s Kensington | The Hardt

 

Private house by David Chipperfield Architects located in London’s Kensington, off Brompton Road in the Brompton Square Conservation Area. The building’s structure is made of in-situ concrete with an 8.5 in (215mm) brick skin, and precast concrete soffits and sills. The visible concrete has colored red to match the bricks and has an exposed aggregate finish. All exterior door and window frames are generous in size and made of bronze. The main materials inside include travertine floors, oak doors and fittings, and polished plaster walls. Several rooms have been lined with different materials to emphasize their function: a small alcove-like space on the piano nobile is covered with deep red leather panels; the walls of the spa are patterned with vertical obeche wood strips.

 

 

 

 

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The Hardt Skywood House by Graham Phillips 1080x675 Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design Architecture Concrete Courtyard Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern Video Wood  UK London Jack Hobhouse Edgley Design   Image of Skywood House by Graham Phillips 1080x675

Skywood House by Graham Phillips

Asher 2:51 am 8:49 pm

Skywood House by Graham Phillips, situated in Denham just outside of London, UK | The Hardt

 

Skywood House by Graham Phillips, situated in Denham just outside of London, UK. The main living space – a double square in plan with a high frame-less glass wall – faces west over the lake. The rectangular form of the glass box is continued by the clerestory windows that run along the tops of the walls that extend towards the lake and the landscape. The bedrooms each have a built-in desk surface and overlook the walled garden. A perimeter of black basalt gravel borders the green lawn. The magnolia tree was preserved in its original position and became central to the garden space. The bedrooms each have a built-in desk surface and overlook the walled garden. A perimeter of black basalt gravel borders the green lawn.The magnolia tree was preserved in its original position and became central to the garden space. The bedrooms have no sliding doors, only frameless glass panels to maximize the view

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Westbourne Grove (2012) by Russell Jones

Asher 2:24 am 8:50 pm

Westbourne Grove (2012) by Russell Jones located in London, United Kingdom | The Hardt

 

Westbourne Grove (2012) by Russell Jones located in London, United Kingdom. The initial brief for a largely unrefurbished Victorian house on the South Side of London’s Westbourne Grove, centered around establishing a new family home for two adults and their young children. During the course of the project, the family expanded from two children to four. Behind the original façade, the buildings circulation, rear form, and fenestration limited the development of a new section able to generate enough space for a growing family. The resulting project involved the complete demolition of all original accommodation behind the front façade, and substantial excavation to facilitate the new proposal. The original half landing and cross wall configuration was superseded by vertically stacked circulation over six levels, and more generously proportioned and planned spaces. The living and dining area, over two levels, are linked by a double height gallery and motorized door, which opens directly onto a rear courtyard. Family accommodation extends beyond the new lower ground level up to the Westbourne Grove pavement.

 

 


 

Level 1 is dedicated to the Master suite, with the upper levels accommodating the 4 children. The carefully considered simple palette of materials has been chosen to absorb and reflect light and provide continuous surfaces for the client’s substantial art collection. Florentine Pietra Serena limestone is used throughout the living spaces and bathrooms, and grey oiled Oak is the primary floor surface in all bedrooms.

© Hélène Binet

 


 

 

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The Hardt Hurst House John Pardey Architects Stro%CC%88m Architects 2 1080x675 Pear Tree House (2012) by Edgley Design Architecture Concrete Courtyard Design Furniture Interior Design Minimal Modern Video Wood  UK London Jack Hobhouse Edgley Design   Image of Hurst House John Pardey Architects Stro%CC%88m Architects 2 1080x675

Hurst House by John Pardey Architects + Ström Architects located in the UK

Asher 1:44 am 8:09 am

Hurst House by John Pardey Architects + Ström Architects located in The UK | The Hardt

 

Hurst House by John Pardey Architects + Ström Architects located in the UK. The Hurst House is a new build one-off contemporary house located on the edge of the village of Bourne End in Buckinghamshire. The site forms part of a garden of a substantial house located on the edge of Bourne End in Buckinghamshire, directly fronting an area of open fields that form part of the Chilterns Area of Outstanding National Beauty (There are currently 33 AONB designations within England). The clients’ brief was to build a very sustainable and contemporary family home that would have the flexibility to successfully cope with changing family conditions as their children grow up and leave the nest.  This lead to a house where they can live in one extended space while family bedrooms can be shut down and left on tick-over.

 


 

A masonry rectangular volume on the ground floor contains bedrooms and is slightly sunken into the ground to reduce the height of the building towards the AONB. A lightweight steel and timber volume on the first floor is set perpendicular to the ground floor volume and contains living, kitchen, and dining spaces, as well as the master bedroom suite. It rests on top of the ground floor volume and spans across to a masonry wall that defines the southern edge of the house. A rectangular service element underneath the first-floor sleeve – separated by a clear-story – defines an entrance lobby with vertical circulation to one side as well as a carport to the other. This arrangement of space allows for a self-contained bedroom wing for children (teenagers) that opens up to a south-facing courtyard, whilst the first-floor volume allows living spaces and master bedroom to make the most of the site with its incredible views of the rolling landscape of the AONB to the west.

 

 


 

A linear balcony along the length of the first floor allows the facade to open up, and the recessed floor to ceiling glazed sliding panels to be shaded in the summer. At the southern end of the first-floor volume, the glazing is pulled back to create an outdoor living area which is open to both the east and the west allowing the sun to reach it at different times of the day. The environmental impact of the house was considered from the outset, and we were aiming to get very close to being a zero carbon home.

 


 

The building utilizes very high levels of insulation. A small highly efficient gas boiler, together with heat recovery ventilation, rainwater recycling, solar water heating, a 10kW wood burner, and a 9.9kWp photovoltaic installation, and low energy fittings throughout, ensure the property has an overall near zero CO2 impact rating. (We are yet to carry out the as-built environmental performance calculations, to establish the exact CO2 impact of the property.) Since the building was connected to services, it has generated 25% more electricity that has been used. We employed high-quality natural materials that enhance and harmonizes with the site; local Weston Underwood coursed stone to ground floor walls, and the upper floor element is clad in British Sweet Chestnut, which weathers to a natural silver color and will last for many centuries without further maintenance. To the garden side, panels of pre-weathered zinc, set within the timber sleeve are employed. These materials will all weather naturally and blend harmoniously with the site and surroundings.

 


 

John Pardey Architects and Strom Architects worked in collaboration to see this building completed. When Magnus Strom left his job as a Director of JPA in 2010 to set up his own practice, John and Magnus decided that it would be beneficial for the project, if Magnus continued working with the detail and construction side of the project as well as overseeing it on site. This collaboration ensured a continuity of the project and has resulted in a strong design that has been detailed with great care and finished to extraordinary quality.

 

© Andy Stagg

 


 

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