Amangiri Resort by Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy

Amangiri Resort by Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy

Amangiri Resort located in 4 Corners Utah by an all-star squad of architects Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy | The Hardt

 

 

Amangiri Resort located in 4 Corners Utah by an all-star squad of architects Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy | The Hardt

 

Amangiri Resort located in 4 Corners Utah by an all-star squad of architects Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy. Amangiri is located on 243 hectares (600 acres) in Canyon Point, Southern Utah, close to the border with Arizona. The resort is tucked into a protected valley with sweeping views over colorful, stratified rock towards the Grand Staircase – Escalante National Monument. The resort is a 25-minute drive amangiri-resort-4-corners-utah-architects-marwan-al-sayed-wendell-burnette-and-rick-joy0204- Amangiri Resort by Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joyfrom the nearest town of Page, Arizona and a 15-minute drive to the shores of LakePowell.  Architecturally, the resort has been designed to blend into the landscape with natural hues, materials, and textures a feature of the design. The structures are commanding and in proportion with the scale of the natural surroundings, yet provide an intimate setting from which to view and appreciate the landscape

amangiri-resort-4-corners-utah-architects-marwan-al-sayed-wendell-burnette-and-rick-joy23 Amangiri Resort by Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy

 


 

Arrival to the resort is via a winding road that descends into the valley and leads to the central Pavilion. Built around the main swimming pool, the Pavilion embraces a dramatic stone escarpment. Within the Pavilion is the Living Room,  Gallery,  Library,  Dining Room,  Private Dining Room, and Cellar.  Two accommodation wings lead from the Pavilion into the desert: 17 suites are located within the North Wing and another 17 suites together with the Aman Spa are located within the South Wing. Outward views from the resort look over the untouched valley surrounded by lofty bluffs. Amangiri offers 34 suites in total: 13 Desert View Suites, 14 Mesa View Suites, one Terrace Suite, two Pool Suites, two Terrace Pool Suites, the Girijaala Suite and the Amangiri Suite.

 

Entry to each suite is via a private the courtyard that features a Douglas Fir timber screen and includes a dining table, two chairs, and a sculptured light form. A glass wall with a central door opens to a combined bedroom and living area which includes a writing desk and a king-sized bed. Beyond the bed is a sitting area which features a low-set sofa, a coffee table, reading chairs and a side table.  A soaring timber cabinet separates the bedroom and living area from the dressing room and houses a television and combined CD/DVD  player. Concertina glass doors open from the sitting area to a spacious desert lounge that frames the view of the natural landscape beyond. The lounge contains a plinth with resting mattresses and a central fireplace.

 

The adjacent sky-lit dressing room extends the full length of the suite and features an extensive wardrobe with a personal safe and spacious dressing area with twin vanities atop a stone plinth. To one end of the dressing room is a separate toilet room and to the other, a spacious bathroom lined with sage green tiles. The bathroom features twin rain showers and a comfortable soaking tub with uninterrupted views of the landscape.

Design finishes include white stone floors and concrete walls that echo the natural stone of the surrounding landscape.  The furniture features rawhide, natural timbers, and fittings in blackened steel, while light-colored cushions and soft throws add warmth.amangiri-resort-4-corners-utah-architects-marwan-al-sayed-wendell-burnette-and-rick-joy88 Amangiri Resort by Marwan al Sayed Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy

Photography: Courtesy of Aman Resorts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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Tehama 1 House (2017) by Studio Schicketanz

Tehama 1 House (2017) by Studio Schicketanz

Located in Carmel-by-the-Sea, United States, Tehama 1 House (2017) by Studio Schicketanz | The Hardt

 

Located in Carmel-by-the-Sea, United States, Tehama 1 House (2017) by Studio Schicketanz. The northern central coast of California is my absolute favorite place in the world. Specifically Big Sur, but we’ll save that for another day. Studio Schicketanz organized the design of this house around a centrally cleared knoll and prioritized outdoor space, producing a deep exploration into the ways in which a structure can merge with and arise from a very specific ecological language. Textured stone walls give rise to controlled cement steps leading to a crisply modernist structure detailed with geometric framing and supporting a cantilevered roof that offers a shaded penumbra around the entirety of the structure. Light is at play everywhere, from the dappled light that hits the stone wall to the reflection of the majestic neighboring tree in the house’s expansive glass facade On the interior, neutral tones from the reclaimed teak flooring and a fir ceiling work with the couple’s art collection and pops of luxurious detail like an antique dresser and a smooth round tub to offer a consistent feeling of an evocatively natural aesthetic. Indoor and outdoor spaces flow seamlessly together through the barest hint of doorways and enclosure; everywhere is permeated by sun and sky.

 

 


 

Studio Schicketanz designed the interiors to operate in effortless conversation with the exteriors; a relaxed sensibility permeates the house, offering a softness that produces a new experience of the modernism of the rest of the structure. The use of plaster reclaimed wood, and hand-hewn details speak to the history of the valley and signal the level of restorative possibilities embedded within this project. The house is part of Clint Eastwood’s coveted Carmel development called Tehama. It’s also part of Schicketanz’s career-long investigation into the relationship between landscape, building materials, form, and nature. Sleek plaster cubes are settled around a courtyard, offering a different material texture from the slick glass exterior of the main living space; views over the mountain range come into conversation with the carefully-considered details. The look is part rustic, part modern, all deeply-felt architecture.

 

 

© Joe Fletcher

 


 

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The CorTen Steel House by Faulkner Architects

The CorTen Steel House by Faulkner Architects

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The CorTen Steel House by Faulkner Architects, located in Orinda, California, United States | The Hardt

 

The CorTen Steel House by Faulkner Architects, located in Orinda, California, United States. The house which recently won an AIACC Honor Award is located on an ex-urban infill site that covers almost eight acres of a Bay Area suburb at the base of the Oakland Hills, draped in rich green foliage and native oak trees. Dense observation of the landscape, climate, culture, and existing uses and patterns of the site were worked out in conversation with the client’s mission to mitigate environmental challenges; Faulkner Architects brings together a site and home both phenomenologically in the design and technologically through sustainable features and practices. Basalt flooring, white gypsum walls, and Cor-Ten steel panels provide a material counterpoint to the textured wood; the steel skin refreshes every time it rains. Developed in close collaboration with the clients is a series of innovative sustainability features that bring the mechanical and electrical systems to net zero.

 

 

 

 

Photography: Joe Fletcher

 

via Home World Design

 


 

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Meadow House by Office Mian Ye

Meadow House by Office Mian Ye

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Meadow House by Office Mian Ye, located in Potomac, Washington D.C. United States | The Hardt

 

 

Meadow House by Office Mian Ye, located in Potomac, Washinton D.C. United States, Meadow House (2014) by Office Mian Ye. The Meadow House visually and physically blends open exterior spaces with intimate private spaces without compromising the integrity of either. Landscape acts as a bridge, creating a seamless flow between interior and exterior and between living and sleeping areas. Located within the setting of a dense American suburb, the neighborhood is lined with modern two- and three-story mansions, many of which are over 10,000 sqf. The client was adamant about departing from what is typically built in the neighborhood by constructing a smaller, single story home. By taking into consideration the site’s solar exposure and context, the Meadow House reinterprets the traditional divide of American front and back yards to create living spaces that are deeply connected to natural light and the surrounding landscape.

 

 

 


 

The house is broken down into two main areas: a place to entertain and a place of rest. A screened foyer leads around to the living room where a large skylight illuminates a pebble-lined garden below. In this open floor plan, the living room is connected to the chef’s kitchen by traveling around an open servery bar that divides the two spaces. Food is prepared and served at this bar during large gatherings, dampening the kitchen noise and commotion from the rest of the party. The bedrooms receive multiple exposures, encircling a Japanese-landscaped garden. This small outdoor space provides both an intimate gathering area for the family as well as a transitional space between inside and outside. The interior walls facing the courtyard house a portion of the owner’s art collection, creating a gallery space that can be viewed from within the courtyard.


 

A knotty cedar screen expands and contracts around all sides of the house, creating a dynamic play of light and shadow within. As one moves around the house, the screen creates privacy, daylight filters and frame to the spaces within. Subtractions from the screen create apertures for views and entries. From the living area, a large opening in the screen creates a seamless connection to the landscaped deck and pool areas, allowing the owners to connect the living room completely to the outside. Various species of climbing vines planted along the perimeter will transform the skin of the house – as they bloom and change colors throughout the year.

 

 

© Mian Ye
© Ehsan Khah

 

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The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects

The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects

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The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects | The Hardt

The Inverted Warehouse/Townhouse by Dean-Wolf Architects is an addition and renovation of a Tribeca loft building. The existing structure, a traditional New York warehouse covers the entire lot, consuming the exterior space traditional in domestic construction. Inverting the conventional townhouse organization recovers this coveted ground. Dissipating energy into the dark center of this converted warehouse, three double story voids animate the missing “garden” of the townhouse providing light, air, and visual contemplation.

Admitting light and townhouse “garden” uses, these new spaces provide the structure for domestic life. Exterior court, reading court, and playroom are suspended into the void. Conceived as a new construction built upside down into an existing building, they dissipate a radiant energy into the host.

Self-structuring corten steel panels are suspended in the voids, their shingle style layering allowing the frameless burgundy glass to float down through the walls. The suspended corten structure extends into the double height volume of the playroom with two-story shelving. Continuing the flow of dissipating energy, the downward trajectory opens the floors of the lower levels, inserting two glass floors. Framed with rolled corten sections, they connect the spaces vertically while opening them to light. Countering the downward hanging of spaces is a courtyard layer of silicone-glazed glass, which lifts delicately to the skyline.

 


Consistent with the logic of inversion, the main entry is onto the fifth floor. Opening onto the tense juxtaposition of exterior and interior voids, the garden lifts to the rooftop while the stair court descends into the private spaces. Two sequences separate public and private routes through these spaces. The upward route joins the public spaces, ending in a continuous roof deck inhabiting the larger space of the city. The downward route traces the inversion into the bedrooms, playrooms, and study through the stair, culminating in the glass floors and extending a view back up through all the gardens to the sky.
© Paul Warchol

 

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Austin Street House by Michael Morrow of Kinneymorrow Architecture

Austin Street House by Michael Morrow of Kinneymorrow Architecture

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Austin Street House by Michael Morrow of Kinneymorrow Architecture located in Marfa, Texas | The Hardt

 

Austin Street House by Michael Morrow of Kinneymorrow Architecture located in Marfa, Texas. Lovely mixture of extreme minimalism and Texas heritage with the hide rugs and barn exterior. Marfa has really come into its own and it’s nice to see Michael Morrow being a part of the expansion of modern minimalism into Texas. “Marfa is one of those places where the light has a special quality about it,” says Morrow. “It seems to imbue the place with a unique nature, and it’s one of the things that draws people here.”“It’s very calming to the mind to visit the desert,” says Morrow. “After you’ve been here a bit, you feel like you’ve reset.”Couldn’t agree with that more. I’ve always held a special place for the arid landscape and the mystic vibes of the desert close to my Hardt.

 

 

 

Photography by Casey Dunn

 

 

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Clyfford Still Museum (2011) by Allied Works Architecture

Clyfford Still Museum (2011) by Allied Works Architecture

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Situated in Denver, Colorado, United States, Clyfford Still Museum (2011) by Allied Works Architecture | The Hardt

 

Situated in Denver, Colorado, United States, Clyfford Still Museum (2011) by Allied Works Architecture. One first encounters the museum through a grove of trees and landscaped forecourt, which provides a place of contemplation, decompression, and transition from the museum’s surrounding urban context. Through the trees, the structure of the building is visible, consisting of cast-in-place architectural concrete walls with a variety of surface relief and texture. The façade features thin, vertical lines of concrete that project from the building’s surface in a fractured, organic, and random pattern, creating a rich surface that changes in the intense Denver sunlight and forms varied shadows across the building.


 

The entry is revealed beneath a canopy of trees, and visitors are welcomed into the museum by a low, long reception lobby. Visitors rise from the lobby and reception area toward the natural light falling from the galleries on the second floor. The museum’s second level features nine light-filled galleries, totaling approximately 10,000 square feet. Each gallery is distinctly defined and proportioned to respond to specific aspects and needs of the collection and helps trace the different phases of Still’s career in chronological sequence.


 

Gallery heights vary to accommodate changes in scale and media; those with 17-foot, 6-inch-high ceilings showcase Still’s monumental Abstract Expressionist canvases, some of which extend to over 12 feet tall and 16 feet long, while smaller galleries with 12-foot ceilings create a more intimate viewing environment for the presentation of smaller-scale paintings and works on paper. Two outdoor terraces and an education gallery offer visitors a moment of reflection and investigation during the gallery sequence and allow them to re-orient themselves with the surrounding and distant landscape. Moving between galleries, visitors are provided glimpses down into the collection storage and interpretive galleries on the first level. The visitor’s experience of the collection is enlivened by natural light that enters the galleries through a series of skylights over a cast-in-place, perforated concrete ceiling. The geometry of openings in the ceiling creates an even field of soft and changing daylight in the galleries. Diffusing glass, motorized shades, and electric light give curatorial flexibility to the gallery spaces, helping to support different gallery configurations and the museum’s rotating exhibition program.

 

 


Upon completing the primary gallery sequence, visitors may descend back to the museum’s first level to explore the painting storage, archive, and exhibition spaces viewable from above. An open double-high corridor connects these facilities and serves as an exhibition hall allowing visitors to further their learning of the history and life of Clyfford Still. A “timeline” section of the corridor places the artist’s work in context with historical events and other artistic movements, and an “archive” hallway presents the everyday artifacts of the artist’s life and information about his painting technique and media. From this corridor, visitors are also able to view the collection storage rooms and assess the number of paintings produced during the artist’s prolific career. A visible conservation lab and a research center offer visitors additional resources for furthering their knowledge of Still’s career. This open corridor speaks to the institution’s founding principle of unveiling this once-private and very personal collection to the public, as it invites a gradual immersion in the works of Still.

© Jeremy Bittermann

 

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