The Hardt Little House mwworks architecturedesign v 2 1050x675 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of Little House mwworks architecturedesign v 2 1050x675

Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States

Asher 7:19 am 7:19 am

Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States | The Hardt

 

Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States. The Little House is nestled into a lush second growth forest on a north facing bluff overlooking Hood Canal with distant views to Dabob Bay. Designed to repurpose an existing foundation, the new building is just over 20m2.  The simple form is abstracted against the forest – a stark exterior contrasting a warm bright interior. The owners live full time in Houston, Texas but have shared many summers with family at a nearby property outside Seabeck. They loved the wildness of the southern Canal and imagined a small retreat here of their own. Early design discussions focused on creating a compact, modern structure that was both simple and inexpensive to build. Intentionally restrained on an existing footprint, the concept grew from this premise – a simple box with large carved openings in both the roof and walls that selectively embrace the views and natural light.

 

 

 

Visitors approach the site from the south. A thin canopy marks the entry and frames views of the Canal below. The more transparent north and west elevations pull the landscape and distant view into the space.  With primary views toward the water, the south and east elevations remain mostly solid, shielding views from the driveway and neighboring properties. Skylights carve into the roof, bringing light and views of the stars over the bed and into the shower. Taut oxidized black cedar and blackened cement infill panels clad the exterior while lightly painted MDF panels and soft pine plywood warm and brighten the interior. On a sunny western corner of the house, a large patio reaches out into the landscape and connects the building to the larger site while serving as a jumping off point to the trail system wandering down to the water’s edge. The small footprint ultimately served as an effective tool to govern the design process. The focus was placed on the essentials and extras were edited out by both desire and a very humble budget. The resulting project hopes to capture the essence of the modern cabin – small in size but much larger than its boundaries.

 

© Andrew Pogue  

 

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

The Hardt Pam Pauls House by Craig Steely Architecture located in Cupertino 63 1080x675 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of Pam Pauls House by Craig Steely Architecture located in Cupertino 63 1080x675

Pam & Paul’s House by Craig Steely Architecture located in Cupertino, United States

Asher 7:44 am 7:44 am

Pam & Paul’s House by Craig Steely Architecture located in Cupertino, United States | The Hardt

 

just west of Silicon Valley. The conceptual idea came clearly and quickly—float a glass box in the leaves of the trees on two trunk-like columns, disrupting as few oaks as possible. The dense tree canopy offers the opportunity to build a complete glass-walled house, protected from the direct rays of the sun, yet filled with dappled sunlight. A bridge of steel grating connects grade to the rooftop of native grasses. An observation deck sits in the grass field along with a garage/foyer of zinc panels and mirror glass. Sunlight funnels down through the foyer into the living level. The main living area is cantilevered into the tree canopy while bedrooms, bathrooms, service, and storage are located behind a long wall of cabinetry along the hillside. Distinct spaces (the living room, the office, and the kitchen) are delineated spatially in the open plan by sinking them into the concrete floor.

 

 

These spaces are further delineated by a material. In the sunken office, all surfaces— flooring, desk, cabinetry— are milled from a single slab of Chinese pistachio. The sunken living room is filled with 144 sq. ft. of B&B Italia’s “Tufty time” sofa components. In the kitchen/dining room, a 22 ft long counter of white composite quartz continues the kitchen work surface into the dining table. In the ceiling, flush mounted LED strips to imply these zones. Strong geometric lines of light, reminiscent of a Dan Flavin sculpture, are clearly visible from the outside looking up through the leaves. 

 

© Darren Bradley

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

 

The Hardt Concrete Box House Robertson Design 3 894x675 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of Concrete Box House Robertson Design 3 894x675

Concrete Box by Robertson Design located in Texas, USA

Asher 10:29 pm 10:29 pm

Concrete Box by Robertson Design located in Texas, USA | The Hardt

 

Concrete Box by Robertson Design located in Texas, USA. Christopher Robertson, principal at Robertson Design created the 2,900 ft² (270 m²) ‘concrete box residence’ located in Texas, USA. The design of The Concrete Box house was begun with three fairly simple concepts as goals: a carefully choreographed entry sequence, material clarity, and a sculptural presence.  The building is composed of three elements- a concrete box, a wooden box, and the low concrete wall that encloses the entry courtyard.  Fenestration on the front is limited, which adds to the sculptural nature of the building.  To enter the building one slips between the two overlapping concrete walls in the front and then passes through the sanctuary-like entry courtyard before arriving at the front door.  

 

 

The door opens into an entry hall that has a low ceiling and is a touch dark.  From here one passes through an opening in the concrete box to enter the brightly lit, the tall volume of the main space.  While passing through the opening, one experiences the thickness and solidity of the concrete walls.  The abundant natural light and expansive views into the front courtyard and rear garden surprise as they are initially difficult to reconcile with the blank façade.  The first floor is basically a single space where slight level changes delineate function between dining, kitchen, and living. There is an office hidden behind sliding walls that allow the owners to work in this space during the day and then literally close the office at times when work is to be forgotten.  The simple and bright white rooms of the second floor stand in marked contrast to the downstairs with its wood and concrete walls.  

© Jack Thompsen

 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related projects:

The Hardt Pulitzer Arts Foundation by Tadao Ando located in St. Louis Missouri USA  1080x675 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of Pulitzer Arts Foundation by Tadao Ando located in St. Louis Missouri USA  1080x675

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation by Tadao Ando located in St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Asher 10:21 am 11:18 am

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation by Tadao Ando located in St Louis, Missouri, USA | The Hardt

 

The Pulitzer Arts Foundation by Tadao Ando located in St. Louis, Missouri, USA is Japanese master Tadao Ando’s very first freestanding public commission in the United States, completed in 2001. Since August 2014, the original building has been undergoing a makeover, in consultation with Ando, to accommodate the foundation’s growing needs. Responding to an increasing demand for space, the new project includes a significant expansion of the foundation’s gallery area. Arranged within the building’s lower level, two major new display spaces, which previously hosted offices and storage, will now be part of the institution’s exhibitions and activities program, aimed to engage the wider public and local community. These new spaces increase the foundation’s program capacity by a striking near-fifty percent. At the same time, the organization (previously known as The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts) relaunches under a new name ‘to emphasize [its] institutional vision’. This is the building’s first major alteration since its completion in the early noughties. And Ando’s skillful redesign is focusing on more than just increasing floor space; a new, additional staircase will support movement through the building and help with visitor flow, perfecting both circulation and visitor experience within the new and old parts.

 

The Hardt Arkansas House 2004 by Marlon Blackwell Architect located in Northwest Arkansas 1080x675 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of Arkansas House 2004 by Marlon Blackwell Architect located in Northwest Arkansas 1080x675

Arkansas House (2004) by Marlon Blackwell Architect located in Northwest Arkansas

Asher 1:29 pm 1:32 pm

Arkansas House (2004) by Marlon Blackwell Architect located in Northwest Arkansas | The Hardt

 

Arkansas House (2004) by Marlon Blackwell Architect located in Northwest Arkansas. The challenge for the Arkansas House was to reassemble a fire-damaged home and introduce possibilities for re-thinking the house’s spatial character by adding new elements. The design had to be completed in three weeks and the details were resolved after construction began – one fragment at a time. The architects were allowed to work only in the fire-damaged zones of the existing house (exterior and interior), leaving the remainder untouched beyond new windows and a new HVAC system. The low-slung existing tartan grid structure, with traces of both Kahn and Wright, was instilled with a new sense of hierarchy through the addition of light monitors and suspended lofts to the children’s spaces, a new kitchen, and a great room with a saddle-back roof for living, entertaining, and the display of fine art. Vertically oriented monitors bring much-needed light through steel windows into the once gloomy interiors most damaged by fire. 

 

 

 

The great room is naturally lit from all sides and fills the center of the house with light and views to the sky and adjacent monitors above. With two children at one end of the house and their father at the other end, the great room is positioned to unite the family in one grand social space. The room cuts across the non-directional grid of the existing structure providing an enriched and contrasting spatial complexity. At the end of the mezzanine a flying wall – a vertical tableau – appears to float in space, the composition of its rusted metal shingles choreographed to the music of Neil Young and the Band. Concrete block piers articulate the corners of each existing space and over time have settled differently, leaving few plumb surfaces to work from. Our tactic was to float cherry and walnut veneer panels over the pier walls and along the ceiling forming a detached interior skin. The flooring of rift-sawn cherry and walnut also act to form an interior liner. Taut and highly crafted, this refined surface acts as an interior liner to the exterior monitors clad in weathering steel shingles. There is a quiet resonance between old and new spaces, enveloped in the warmth of various American hardwoods – they combine for a new material presence that softens their differences. Comfortably astride the old house, the angled shell forms exude empathy with a rusted barn nearby; the effects of weather and dripping tree sap provide their rusted surfaces with character – raw and visceral – a foil to the painted shades of beige on the walls below. Out of the ashes, a new structure emerges, a history continues; the old is transformed in the shadow of the new.

 

Photos by  © Tim Hursley

 

 


 

Aesthetically and Geographically Related Projects:

The Hardt Ron Rojas House Rene Gonzalez Architect %C2%A9 Michael Stavaridis  1080x675 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of Ron Rojas House Rene Gonzalez Architect %C2%A9 Michael Stavaridis  1080x675

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect

Asher 9:53 pm 9:53 pm

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States | The Hardt

 

Ron Rojas House (2017) by Rene Gonzalez Architect located in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States. The Key Biscayne Residence developed in response to its sub-tropical island environment. Pools are the principle, and ever-present, organizing elements of the series of living spaces, providing a feeling of coolness in the bright Miami light. Moving through the house, the experiences shift from being outdoors in a vertical space that is enveloped with walls of clay louvers, to entering a horizontally organized living area surrounded by glass doors that can entirely open to breezeways and pools.

 

 


 

The Key Biscayne Residence is depictive of the Latin cultural environment that surrounds it, including the client for whom it was designed. The South Florida community has many Latin American residents and the intent was to design a contemporary, comfortable house within a condition inclusive of many Mediterranean-style homes that are embedded in these cultural conditions. As a result, many architectural elements are utilized that are inherent to the Latin tradition including patios, Portales (porches), and persianas (louvered screens). The use of materials and overall layout present a series of spatial experiences defined by light and shadow and permeable connections between interior and exterior. Implicitly interpreting the persianas, which filter light as well as mitigate heat, terracotta brick louver systems were selected in three types: a more traditional and regular horizontal pattern, pivoting vertical panels, and textural, more solid bricks.

 

The house itself is a series of interlocking and overlapping volumes with voids, allowing for spatial complexity and spaces that snake through the house. Because the floor level is elevated to be free from flooding, one must ascend to enter. The reflecting pools at the entry and visible pool at the rear of the house contribute to the sensory, floating quality of this private home.

 

© Michael Stavaridis

 


 

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The Hardt The Cresta by Jonathan Segal 1080x675 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of The Cresta by Jonathan Segal 1080x675

The Cresta by Jonathan Segal

Asher 8:27 pm 8:27 pm

The Cresta by Jonathan Segal located in the wealthy beach city of La Jolla, San Diego, CA | The Hardt

 

CRESTA from BREADTRUCK FILMS on Vimeo.

 

The Cresta by Jonathan Segal FAIA located in the wealthy beach city of La Jolla, San Diego, CA. The 5,300ft² (492 m²) home has 3-stories; 1 below and 2 above grade which are accented by floor to ceiling and large open expanses to the outdoors. The home constructed entirely out of “cast in place” concrete on a 5,000 ft²  (464 m²) lot. Adjacent to the front of the structure a reflecting and swimming pool has been integrated into the overall design of the project for thermal cooling and create the perception of floating.

 

 

Photos by © Matthew Segal

 


 

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The Hardt Dialogue House Wendell Burnette Architects 332 1080x540 Little House by mw|works architecture+design located in Seabeck, United States Architecture Decor Design Furniture Glass Interior Design Landscape Nature View Wood  washington USA Seabeck mw|works architecture+design Andrew Pogue   Image of Dialogue House Wendell Burnette Architects 332 1080x540

Situated in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, The Dialogue House by Wendell Burnette

Asher 3:08 pm 7:06 am

Situated in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, The Dialogue House by Wendell Burnette | The Hardt

 

Situated in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, The Dialogue House by Wendell Burnette. The design of the house was mostly inspired by John Charles van Dyke’s book, The Desert. Two volumes of light – one warm and one cool – one projected to the expansive horizon and one toward the canopy of the desert sky. Inspired by John Van Dyke’s ruminations on the phenomena of desert light specifically “colored air” and “reflected light” in his 1907 book titled The Desert – Further Studies in Natural Appearances. The 2200sf Dialogue House is a gestalt instrument for touching the full range and specificity of this light, this “place” – day and night, season to season and year to year. At the base of Echo Mountain (amidst an eclectic jumble of 1950′s-60′s ranch bungalows) the main living volume is elevated above work, guest, and the car, furthest from the street on a lateral pinwheel brace of charcoal masonry walls that extend cardinally capturing the site. This well-shaded volume is projected south toward the South Mountain and Sierra Estrella Mountain ranges far across the Phoenix basin and the downtown skyline.

 

 


At the base of Echo Mountain (amidst an eclectic jumble of 1950’s-60’s ranch bungalows), the main living volume is elevated above work, guest, and the car, furthest from the street on a lateral pinwheel brace of charcoal masonry walls that extend cardinally capturing the site. This well-shaded volume is projected south toward the South Mountain and Sierra Estrella mountain ranges far across the Phoenix basin and downtown skyline. The exterior surfaces of the pinwheel walls, as well as the main volume, absorb and reflect light akin to the “desert varnish” that coats the volcanic geology of the Phoenix Mountains turning silver, red, purple-brown-black during the day only to collapse into silhouettes at night. Thus, “life after work” is simultaneously supported by the apparent thickness and thinness of light. The interior of the street volume is plastered cool white, half terrace – half cool water as a retreat from the city within the city where one can only see the sky. Wind and water activated light is refracted onto the interior surfaces by day and most dramatically at night, which provides an animated foreground to the skyline and distant horizon beyond. Begun many years ago, the Dialogue House has an interesting history and was finally completed in April of 2012.

 

© Bill Timmerman.

 


 

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