Chalet Val D’hérens (2013) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Chalet Val D’hérens (2013) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

Situated in Saint-Martin, Switzerland, Chalet Val D’hérens (2013) by Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes | The Hardt

 

Situated in Saint-Martin, Switzerland, Chalet Val D’hérens (2013) by  Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes. Located in val d’hérens, the new building, facing due south, enjoys an open view of the valley. The sloping plot offers a natural plateau at its top. Consequently, the building sets up on this flat area, avoiding major land modifications. The volume is opening out in facets turning towards the major points of view: the village northwest, the valley and the Alps south and east. Inside the chalet, the wood on the walls and the woodworks lead to a warm atmosphere, contrasting with the concrete of the central core. This facade modeling can be read in the inner spaces, which are facing every direction. On the ground floor, the daily rooms are centering around a circulation concrete core leading to the 4 levels and integrating the bathrooms. The slabs are cut around this core, generating visual relations between the floors.

 

 


 

The concrete structure is covered with wood cladding on the upper levels, in reference to the typical barns of the village. The concrete base on the ground floor is distorting to form a large terrace, covered with the superior level overhang. Inside the chalet, the wood on the walls and the woodworks lead to a warm atmosphere, contrasting with the concrete of the central core.

 

© Thomas Jantscher

 


 

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Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11

Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11

Located in Allens Rivulet, Australia, Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11 | The Hardt

 

Located in Allens Rivulet, Australia, Allens Rivulet House (2009) by Room 11. A defined grid relating to the various uses set the kitchen at its center, becoming slightly deformed as rooms were angled towards particular views. Revolving around this hardt the house eventually lifts to peer over the first level ring and towards Mt Wellington. Voids allow the hardt to be visible from various spaces within the house. The compact plan is extended via the positioning of voids and linked external areas. Internal and external spaces are blurred at one extreme and highly contained in others.


The house has a duality of character and experience defined by the way it responds to context and use. On approach its angular and severe form is a toughened abstract container, bracing itself against the robust Tasmanian landscape and weather conditions. Passing through the “hollowed out” portals, the warm and sheltering underbelly is exposed and acts as a protective envelope. These areas of in-between, outside but surrounded by the building’s form, are a result of a considered approach to outdoor living within typical Tasmanian weather condition, ie “4 seasons in one day”. They allow one to sit in the sunshine but avoid the cold winter wind, or alternatively sit outdoors and avoid the harsh high UV summer sun. The spaces shift from fully enclosed to semi-enclosed, with roof and without, culminating in a roof deck for maximum exposure and view

 

 


The client’s wish for the kitchen to be the heart of the home generated the internal layout. A defined grid relating to the various uses set the kitchen at its center, becoming slightly deformed as rooms were angled towards particular views. Revolving around this heart the house eventually lifts to peer over the first level ring and towards Mt Wellington. Voids allow the heart to be visible from various spaces within the house. The compact plan is extended via the positioning of voids and linked external areas. Internal and external spaces are blurred at one extreme and highly contained in others. Dark metallic cladding was employed for low maintenance and to allow the building to recede into the shadows of the hill-scape when viewed from afar. Entry points and areas for outdoor living were conceptually cleaved out of the metallic box and lined with “warm” timber. The house employs a suspended concrete slab through the living area for thermal mass, absorbing the heat transferred through glass walls to the north. Natural ventilation operates via airflow through the connecting adjacent tree voids.

 

Photos by Ben Hosking


 

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The Timber House from KÜHNLEIN Architektur

The Timber House from KÜHNLEIN Architektur

The Timber House from KÜHNLEIN Architektur is situated on a high plateau in Upper Palatinate, a part of Bavaria, Germany | The Hardt

 

The Timber House from KÜHNLEIN Architektur is situated on a high plateau in Upper Palatinate, a part of Bavaria, Germany.Two gabled structures are unified with wooden lamellas: one containing living spaces and the other a series of bedrooms. The combination creates two yards: One becomes the space you pass by as you enter the house from the street, while the other is a terrace oriented towards the wide landscape. The windows to the street side are screened with the lamellae of the timber facade, while the windows to the landscape side have a free view, the facade is untreated larch wood, so it will grey with time. So from afar, the house appears like identical side-by-side homes, completely devoid of windows.

 

 


 

Inside, the timber continues, with the exposed structural framework, oak floors, as well as wooden tables, cabinets, and effects.The wooden interior is complemented with copper fittings like lighting, switches, handles, and faucets. Custom made sockets and lamps were designed to tie the look together. The effect brings a comfortable living atmosphere inside.The electrical installation consists of copper pipes installed in front of the massive timber walls, so it was not necessary to perforate the walls. All the installations were designed by KÜHNLEIN Architektur, including the lamps, switches, and sockets.” An open-plan living space occupies the northernmost wing. It includes a wood-burning stove that rotates, as well as dining table created using offcuts from the build. A little cloak-cabin for work clothes connects the garage, which sits at the front of this block. Three bedrooms are contained within the south-facing volume, as well as bathrooms. The master suite is positioned at the far end, offering views out over the landscape.

Courtesy of KÜHNLEIN Architektur

 


 

 

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Atrium Townhome & Garden (2016) by Robitaille Curtis

Atrium Townhome & Garden (2016) by Robitaille Curtis

Atrium Townhome & Garden (2016) by Robitaille Curtis located in Montreal, Canada | The Hardt

 

Atrium Townhome & Garden (2016) by Robitaille Curtis located in Montreal, Canada. Built in 1978, this townhouse needed a major update. Guests (young family) wanted to personalize the house with a unique, playful, modern, and friendly design. In addition, their pets, including a Great Dane, required that the kitchen and living room could be closed (despite a narrow open floor), and that the materials were sturdy. On the ground, floor the plan was opened allowing a visual and physical connection to the garden. The atrium has been enlarged. A large 2-story library, as well as Douglas Fir slats, are spreading and animating the vertical volume. The polished concrete floors, sliding doors and metal mesh curtains meet the functional needs. While at the top floor, a trapeze mesh square, such as the sun’s cirque, crosses the atrium, eliminating the need for a railing and providing a unique playing surface for children and adults.


This townhome has a 32 ‘atrium with a skylight running the full width of the house. Our design embraces this feature and heightens the experience of its dynamic interior volume. A fireplace is integrated as a central focal point. Atop the mantle is a great bookcase that provides one eye upward through the atrium.  At the main living level, the kitchen has been relocated to the front of the room and has been designed and built in a contemporary style. A detailed millwork ‘cube’ is a primary organizing element of the ground floor plan. It is a nicely proportioned object that moves through the space as it separates the living room from the atrium and kitchen. The ‘cube’ contains two concealed glass doors that allow the living room to be closed off. It also conceals a coat closet at the entrance of the home and hides a discreet powder room. At the ground floor level and up the vertical wall, vertical grain Douglas fir slats provide screened views through the home and eliminate the need for guardrails. Douglas fir, concrete floors, and white lacquered millwork combine to create crisp, clean, and warm material palette.

 


 

At the third floor level, a net ‘floor’ has been installed at the top of the room to become a dramatic play surface adjacent to the kid’s bedrooms. The use of a net in this location precludes the need for guardrails and opens the floor to unimpeded views to the third floor. Riggers from Cirque du Soleil provided and installed the trapeze net. In the garden has a seating area adjacent to the kitchen. Carefully placed hornbeams create an aerial hedge offering privacy while adjacent buildings while focusing attention towards the rear of the garden. At the garden’s terminus, views are borrowed from a mature grove of hemlocks and spruce trees, enhancing the sense of lushness in this small city garden. Additionally, a small, shallow, fountain built into a concrete bench serves as a focal point.

 

Photography and Graphic Images by Robitaille Curtis

 

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ReSlope House in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata

ReSlope House in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata

Situated in Kobe, Japan ReSlope House in Kobe by Tomohiro Hata | The Hardt

 

Everyday life of 10000 times

The number of times for daily living will amazingly expand when you begin your life in a new house. First, notice that one year contains 365 days. Within 30 years, you will have spent more than 10,000 days. Everyday necessities such as cooking, cleaning, laundry, using the restroom or taking a bath are repeated more than 10,000 times. Thinking about it, to live daily in an affluent place such as a house can lead to enriched things. We try to consciously design houses for long-term daily living.

Joy, Anger, Grief, and Pleasure

In daily life, people live, experiencing a variety of emotions. One day you may feel fine as you can forgive anything. The next day you may feel withdrawn or overwhelmed by deep grief as you don’t feel like talking to anyone. There may be days positive feelings are encouraged by listening to the voice of your children jumping around at a reading room. We think that creating a house is to create a personal space which can embrace the complexity of human psychology.

Resident and Residence

People change as time goes by. Naturally, families can change as well. We have never ever thought of creating a house in order to adjust it to our clients or their families. We do keep in mind that we uniquely design a house for the existence of the person so that the space and the resident can connect with each other. We embrace a natural flow every time we create a totally different house.

Client and Architect

As an architect, listening to a client’s demand is essential. However, we do not think of creating architecture solely by accepting anything the client wishes. Space should be created by considering the essence of what a client does and does not wish. Every single day we design with such considerations in mind

 


 

© Toshiyuki Yano

If you’re as obsessed with Japanese architecture as much as I am, you’ll want to check these projects out as well – House In Kakinokizaka by Satoshi Okada – House in Hiro by Suppose Design Office – The House in Sri Lanka by Tadao Ando (Not located in Japan but designed by a Japanese LEGEND) –  House in Hanekita by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

 


 

Casa Sant Feliu (2004-2007) by dataAE

Casa Sant Feliu (2004-2007) by dataAE

Casa Sant Feliu (2004-2007) by dataAE located in Sant Feliu de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain | The Hardt

 

Casa Sant Feliu (2004-2007) by dataAE located in Sant Feliu de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. The project is a single-family home and a two-story house in the old quarter of Sant Feliu de Llobregat. Paying attention to the northern orientation of the existing garden and the need to distribute the program on three floors, the organization of the program that is proposed offers a patio-terrace in the center of the plan that makes it possible to illuminate and ventilate the interior of the home correctly. All of the spaces are organized in lateral bands of services that concentrate the “servant spaces” with a distribution fixed in time in order to make it possible to free up the “served” spaces with an open and flexible distribution.

 

 


 

Make sure you also check out these courtyard gems – Apartment Building on Forsterstrasse (2003) by Christian Kerez  – House M2 (2014) by Hernández Silva Arquitectos  –  Venice House (2013) by Sebastian Mariscal Studio

Photos by Adrià Goula

 


 

Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau

Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau

Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau located in Beirut, Lebanon | The Hardt

 

Wadi Penthouse (2016) by Platau located in Beirut, Lebanon. The project is an interior refurbishment of a two floors penthouse for a family of four, located in Wadi Abu Jamil in Beirut Central District. The original arrangement of the penthouse presented a fragmented circulation between its two floors with poor spatial interaction and a narrow main foyer. The most significant spatial intervention was the introduction of a double-height space at the center of the house, reorganizing around it the once fragmented realms of living areas, work areas, storage, and bedrooms.


Defined by a clad wooden skin, such element features a widened entrance that transitions smoothly to the reception and brings back to its center the staircase as a feature element.The stairs become a floating structure within such space, suspended from the ceiling through vertical steel profiles that emphasize its lightness and its detachment from skin and slab as if it’s floating in the middle of the double height space.

 

 

 


The wooden skin’s form reconciles the different misalignments and provides a curvilinear horizontal and vertical continuity between the widened lobby and adjacent spaces on both floors. This skin integrates doors to adjoining rooms, storage closets, see-through cutouts and incorporated lighting.It turns the corner to maintain the same treatment for the inner living room wall. Steel profiles stick out of the skin to create door handles and shelves. Complementing the minimal materiality, a playful custom-made steel and copper lighting fixture hangs from the double height reception.


In contrast with its wooden skin core, the remaining surfaces of the penthouse are white paint for walls, white marble for floors and white steel for the staircase. The different rooms are designed with a recurrent system of having the exterior walls painted white and the internal walls with different playful wood cladding to incorporate doors, library, and closets. During its development and execution phases, the project became an exploration of the wide array of means for both designing and fabricating architecture on the light on local craftsmanship constraints.

 

© Wissam Chaaya

 

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